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Roast chestnuts recipe


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Roast chestnuts are a great snack to enjoy on a cold winter's day. They are quick and easy to make and taste fantastic.

9 people made this

IngredientsServes: 4

  • 1kg whole chestnuts

MethodPrep:5min ›Cook:15min ›Ready in:20min

  1. Preheat oven to 200 C / Gas 6.
  2. Cut an X at the top of each chestnut and place on a baking tray.
  3. Roast for 15-20 minutes in preheated oven until the cuts opens up and slightly bend outwards. Peel and enjoy whilst still hot.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(11)


Chestnut Roast

A delicious veggie nut roast, packed with Christmassy chestnuts and filling mushrooms, ideal for slimming plans like Weight Watchers!

Also in these categories:

Easy Peasy

Nutrition Per Serving

  • Calories 189
  • Carbs 32g
  • Protein 6.7g
  • Fat 2.4g
  • Saturates 0.6g
  • Sugars 11g

For the full list of ingredients and comprehensive instructions, please see the recipe card below. Before you scroll, there’s important stuff in the blurb!

Chestnuts are a staple part of Christmas, with the rustic aroma filling the kitchen when they’re roasting away. Did you know they’re lower in fat than many other nuts too?

For a veggie friendly main, this Chestnut Roast is the ideal choice. Packed with filling mushrooms and nutritious veggies, it’s a Christmas Day treat that won’t stray too far from slimming plans!

We’ve used ready cooked chestnuts as we’re all about minimising fuss and hassle, especially on an occasion like Christmas where it feels like there’s so much to do and so little time! You can make it even quicker by using a mini food processor to chop your nuts and mushrooms.

If you have any leftover chestnuts, transform them into Chestnut Stuffing for another day:

We love that you can prepare this roast in advance and reheat it from defrosted in only 20 minutes, so you’ve got a vegetarian alternative to the traditional Turkey in next to no time. You can even add a couple of Halloumi in Blankets for a finishing touch!

Take a look at our Christmas category for even more delicious festive recipes!


Pan-Roasted Chestnuts

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One of the first signs of winter, aside from holiday lights, is roasted chestnuts sold on city streets. Slowly roasted, the chestnut, which is more like a starch than a nut, makes the perfect sweet and savory snack. Plus it’s healthy: low in fat and calories full of fiber, calcium, and vitamin C.

Since chestnuts are highly perishable, they need to be eaten soon after purchasing them, and they should be stored in a breathable bag in the refrigerator.

Chestnuts can be tough to peel, and while freshness plays a part in this, so does the cooking method. This pan-roasted technique steams the chestnuts first to open the shells and separate the skin from the flesh. Then the steamed chestnuts are slowly roasted in the same pan. The process is easy, and the results delicious. For an alternative chestnut roasting method, check out our oven-roasted chestnut recipe.

This recipe was featured as part of our Winter Ingredients photo gallery.


Preparation

Step 1

Preheat oven to 425°. Place a large sheet of foil on a rimmed baking sheet. Place chestnuts, flat side down, on a work surface. Using a utility knife or a sharp paring knife, carefully cut through the shell on the rounded side of each chestnut to score an X. Soak in a bowl of hot water for 1 minute (this helps them steam while roasting).

Step 2

Drain chestnuts and pat dry place in a medium bowl. Add rosemary, butter, 2 teaspoons salt, and nutmeg. Season with pepper and toss to thoroughly coat. Arrange chestnuts in a single layer in center of foil (a few might overlap) and gather up edges of foil around chestnuts, leaving a large opening on top.

Step 3

Roast until the peel begins to curl up and chestnuts are cooked through, 30-45 minutes, depending on size and age of nuts.

Step 4

Transfer chestnuts to a platter, using a spatula to scrape in any butter and spices with them, and toss to coat. Season with more salt, if desired. Serve hot or warm.

How would you rate Dan Roman's Buttery Roasted Chestnuts in Foil?

First time ever I’ve made roasted chestnuts and this recipe is an absolute winner and was easy to follow and quick to make. They cooked to perfection, peeled easily and were delicious with a buttery rosemary basting. Thank you!


    1. Preheat oven to 425°F. Place a large sheet of foil on a rimmed baking sheet. Place chestnuts, flat side down, on a work surface. Using a utility knife or a sharp paring knife, carefully cut through the shell on the rounded side of each chestnut to score an X. Soak in a bowl of hot water for 1 minute (this helps them steam while roasting).
    2. Drain chestnuts and pat dry place in a medium bowl. Add rosemary, butter, 2 teaspoons salt, and nutmeg. Season with pepper and toss to thoroughly coat. Arrange chestnuts in a single layer in center of foil (a few might overlap) and gather up edges of foil around chestnuts, leaving a large opening on top.
    3. Roast until the peel begins to curl up and chestnuts are cooked through, 30-45 minutes, depending on size and age of nuts.
    4. Transfer chestnuts to a platter, using a spatula to scrape in any butter and spices with them, and toss to coat. Season with more salt, if desired. Serve hot or warm.

    This Recipe is Featured In:


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    I was really happy with this recipe, though, I used around 1/3 - 1/2 cup water at the end as the 1/4 cup evaporated quite quickly, even with the lid on. Also, I used a pair of sharp-tipped kitchen shears to make the X and found it much easier than using a knife (and I consider my self fairly skilled with a knife). I did find that the inner shell/skin still stuck a bit and tried the tip about microwaving them for 20 seconds once they've cooled and found that it worked pretty well. Very happy over all!

    After reading several techniques for roasting AND ease of shelling, I choose this one with modifications. I soaked the whole nuts in boiling water for 30 minutes after cutting thru shells drained thoroughly. Then I proceeded as written. Things of beauty and will add that extra taste to my stuffing.

    Nice and simple recipe. I followed one of the reviewer's method of baking them in the oven at 400 degrees for 30 mins (I did use some oil). I also found cutting the chestnuts (with a regular knife) laborious. The chestnuts where my "X" cut through to the flesh were drier than the ones where only the shell was cut. Cutting the chestnuts were time consuming but they turned out quite nicely.

    Delicious, but I now understand why most people buy jarred chestnuts. I found these very high maintenance. My finger was numb from cutting the "X" before I was even halfway through. And there has to be a trick to removing that pesky inner shell - can someone share it with me? I wish these were easier - Iɽ make them much more often.

    Simple/perfect. TIP: After allowing the chestnuts to cool, reheat or microwave for 20 seconds and the inner skin slips off with the warm shell. (I had no problems with the roasting, when using a nonstick pan without oil.)

    I will always add fresh roasted chestnuts to my stuffing thanks to this easy recipe

    After puncturing the shell, I just place a dozen or so chestnuts on a shallow baking pan and put in the toaster oven for about 30 minutes at 400 degrees. After cooling about five minutes, they are easy to peel and it's easier to get inner husk off.

    There's no recipe that I can think of that is as basic as this one and that produces so much pleasure for those who get to enjoy the results. I go without oil at the beginning and water at the end -- the chestnuts are all you need! This is how, as a kid, I remember street vendors prepared them on cold winter days in northern Italy.

    Good and quick way to roast chestnuts. I roast chestnuts once a year for stuffing at Thanksgiving and I'll use this method next time. Like another reviewer, though, I had a lot of trouble getting the chestnuts out of the inner shell.

    I love chestnuts. But every time (including this recipe) the fuzzy part of the shell sticks to the chestnuts. Is there anything I can do to make it stop doing it?

    Quick and easy, just what roasting chestnuts should be about. Great with some Prosecco or Beaujolais Villages Nouveau. I would have given this the full 4 forks however, it needed a "bit" mote water at the end to ensure tender chestnuts. As for the review "A Cook from S.C. on 11/27/03" I have two things to say: - recipe did recommend cast-iron in the Equipment section - charred nuts are a sign that the shaking of the pan was insufficient. Nuts should not be left to sit for too long on the skillet when on direct heat. Cheers!

    Amazingly easy. I used a very sharp chef's knife to make the X and had no problems. Warning: there is a lot of smoke involved in the roasting process, so use a fan or open window.

    I did not doas good a job as I could have. I am trying them again this year and over the open fire. I will make deeper cuts in the nuts and take my time with them.

    Great easy recipe! Everyone loved this as a "nosh" during the afternoon of Thanksgiving. before the big meal. I think everyone had fond memories of roasting chestnuts with their families over the fireplace as children. I would recommend atleast doubling the cooking time in the water and making them early as they really have to cool well before anyone could shell them.

    It was good to see how easy they were to prepare--but your recipe should have recommended a cast iron skillet. I am still scrubbing my brand new all clad skillet and will be for another few days.

    My dad has been roasting chestnuts since I was a kid, but this recipe was so much quicker and easier! The chestnuts came out perfectly! Just make sure you score them well so that they're easier to peel.

    GROWING UP, OUR THANKSGIVING AND CHRISTMAS S' WERE SPENT WITH OUR GRANDMOTHER, AUNTS AND UNCLES. THE ONE THING THAT WAS CONSTANT WAS THAT OUR GRANDMA ALWAYS HAD ROASTED CHESTNUTS FOR THE FOUR KIDS AMONG ALL OF THE ADULTS. THE ONLY DIFFERENCE IN YOUR RECIPE IS NO OIL OR WATER WAS USED. A HOLE WAS PUNCHED OR THE TOP CUT OFF OF EACH CHESTNUT AND HEATED IN CAST IRON SKILLET FOR ABOUT 30 MINS. AND SHOOK A COUPLE OF TIMES DURING THEIR ROASTING TO KEEP THEM FROM BURNING.

    Simple recipe for an oldtime favorite. The second time I made it I added a 1/2 teaspoon of liquid smoke to the water. It added a whole new dynamic.


    • 8 cups water
    • 1 pound fresh chestnuts, rinsed and dried
    • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter (1/2 stick)
    • 1 cinnamon stick
    • 1/8 teaspoon salt
    • 1/8 teaspoon sugar
    • Pinch of freshly grated nutmeg

    Place a large cast iron pan in the oven and pre-heat the oven to 425°F.

    Bring the water to a boil in a large saucepan over high heat. While the water is heating, carve an "X" into the rounded side of each chestnut with a serrated knife. Cut through the shell only, being careful not to cut too deep into the nut itself.

    When the water reaches a boil, quickly blanch the slit chestnuts for 30 seconds. Drain and dry the chestnuts, then transfer them, "X" side up, to the heated skillet in the oven. Roast the chestnuts for 25-30 minutes, just until the shell starts to curl away from the nut.

    Transfer the nuts to a large cutting board and cover loosely with a kitchen towel. Set aside just until the nuts are cool enough to handle—the nuts will be easier to peel while they are still warm.

    Place the skillet on the stovetop and add the butter, cinnamon stick, salt, sugar, and nutmeg. The skillet should still be hot enough to melt the butter. Stir everything until the butter is completely melted, then transfer the butter mixture to a small bowl.

    Using your fingers, peel away the shells and brown skins of the chestnuts. If any brown skin clings to the nuts, a paring knife can be used to peel them away. You can choose to toss the peeled chestnuts in the melted butter, or serve the butter on the side. Serve the chestnuts while still warm.


    Chestnut and chickpea roast

    I don&rsquot think I will ever tire of seeing my name in print when I have recipes featured in magazines. It&rsquos pretty damn exciting.

    This month, I have six vegetarian Christmas recipes published in Superfood magazine (which I was also featured in earlier this year), and they&rsquove very kindly allowed me to republish one of them here &ndash chestnut and chickpea roast! If you want to see the other five recipes (including rosemary roasted potato stacks and red lentil gravy), you&rsquoll have to grab a copy of the magazine &ndash but for now, hopefully this chestnut and chickpea roast will do.

    Luckily, it&rsquos a pretty awesome recipe. It would make a great Christmas main course (yes, I am well and truly talking about Christmas now, sorry but I&rsquom totally not sorry), or even a Thanksgiving main for anyone who&rsquos super disorganised and hasn&rsquot yet decided what they&rsquore making (get yourself together!).

    The mixture is easy to prepare &ndash it&rsquos just some cooked veggies, chestnuts and chickpeas all mixed together, with some oats and a couple of eggs to bind. I also added a small handful of grated cheese, which helps to keep everything nice and moist and adds a really nice flavour. It&rsquos quite a versatile recipe &ndash you could add some chopped nuts or dried cranberries to make it taste even more festive, and you can swap the veggies depending on what you like / have in the fridge.

    I cooked my chickpea roast in a spring-form cake tin, which makes it really easy to pop out and cut into slices. A normal loaf tin would work just fine too, or a rectangular tin if you&rsquod prefer to cut it into squares. It&rsquos brilliant served with roast potatoes and all the usual Christmas veggies &ndash and don&rsquot forget the gravy!

    If you can&rsquot find Superfood magazine in the shops, you can always buy a copy online to see my other five recipes (plus lots of other awesome stuff!).


    Start Cooking

    Prepare the Roast

    Spray an eight-quart pot with cooking spray.

    Add onions and garlic. Add roast and brown, over high heat, on all sides. Add salt and pepper.

    Lower heat and cook covered four hours. Do not add water the meat and onions will give off liquid.

    Cool and slice the meat. (This can be done the day before.)

    Return the meat, onions, and garlic to the pot. Add bay leaves, white wine, more seasoning if necessary, and chestnuts. Bring to a boil. Lower heat and cook for one hour.

    Cool and refrigerate or freeze (freeze gravy separately) until using.

    You can sub almost any roast of your choice. I&rsquove made this with brisket, French roast, etc.


    Pork loin roast with chestnuts

    December is a month for feasting -- which is not necessarily to say gorging, though it sometimes seems like it. Eating well is not the same thing as stuffing yourself and eating sensibly is not the same as being dull.

    Take this holiday menu, for example.

    This porcini soup looks and tastes richer than it is. One secret is that it’s not a smooth puree -- leaving the texture a bit chunky makes it feel more substantial.

    Here are a few more. You won’t have to saute the mushrooms in butter or oil, because they’re dried. All you have to do is rehydrate them. Cook a little rice in the broth, and when you puree it, the rice will thicken the soup and you won’t need a butter-and-flour roux.

    When you do use fattening ingredients, use only the best and use them in a way that makes them count. Two tablespoons (not a cup) of whipping cream will give the soup a lovely feeling of richness. Serve the soup in a large, shallow bowl to make the portion feel larger than it is.

    A bone-in pork loin makes a handsome display, and it’s a good choice for the main course because today’s pork has been bred to be lean. (In fact, it’s so lean you have to be careful not to overcook it, or it will dry out.)

    Ask the butcher to cut through the chine bone between each chop to make carving easier. Make little pockets between the bones and stuff them with dried apricots, sage and garlic for an intriguingly sweet, herbaceous note. I like to spoon lightly buttered bread crumbs on the roast for extra flavor and texture.

    When it comes time to make the gravy, again, forget about the roux. Just a tablespoon of a light, stock-based sauce made with a little Port wine will give another dimension of flavor and a suggestion of richness.

    Take a little time to roast some fresh chestnuts for a garnish. Not only will they look great, they’ll taste better then canned chestnuts. Give each diner two chestnuts to peel and savor.

    Braised red cabbage is wonderful with pork, but it doesn’t need the traditional duck fat or loads of slab bacon. Two slices of bacon, rounded out with fennel seed, are enough. The cabbage can be prepared a day ahead and will taste even better reheated.

    In place of a heavy dessert, I like a few sweet bites that are rich with interesting flavors. This time, I start with a Seckel pear, poached in a cinnamon stock with orange zest and a little Port, mainly for color. It stands overnight in the poaching liquid to absorb more flavor. The Seckel is the smallest of pear varieties, so the sauce penetrates it better. For those who think poached pears are a deprivation dessert, the deep, complex flavors of this one will be a revelation.

    Set each pear half on a little pedestal of spongecake. You can buy the cake, or make your own up to a week in advance. (Just cover it well and seal it in a plastic bag before freezing. Take the cake out of the freezer an hour before serving. Cut out the rounds of cake and let them stand, covered, until you’re ready to serve.) Then just top it with the pear half, a touch of vanilla yogurt and some honey.

    This is a dessert that should please everybody what makes it really memorable is chestnut blossom honey. This rugged, robust honey brings out a whole new side of the pear, and a touch of vanilla yogurt tempers its bitter edge.