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These Groups Want to Settle on Mars by Experimenting With Food and Steel


“Project Food & Steel” has a mission to help two planets: Earth and Mars

Life on Mars is even closer than we think.

Two organizations, Food for Mars and Two Planet Steel, are addressing the issues of sustainability and climate change on Earth, while also looking into establishing human settlements on Mars by experimenting with steel and food.

When studying steel, the organizations are observing iron ore separation with no carbon dioxide emissions, which could be used to replace traditional blast furnaces, according to a press release.

"Transitioning from blast furnaces to clean iron ore reduction will really help climate change," Dr. R.M Olsen, founder of Two Planet Steel, said in a statement. "Fortunately, there is a way to implement this transition that will put money and jobs into the U.S. iron and steel industry around the Great Lakes and this U.S. phase can set off a worldwide transition from blast furnaces to clean ore reduction."

Food growth is also being studied with special sand and dust samples that are similar to those that have been found on Mars by NASA rovers Spirit, Opportunity, and Curiosity.

The results of the experiments will give a better understanding of life on Mars and more insight into sustainable food and clean iron production on Earth.

The organizations will be sourcing funds for their research on Kickstarter through December.


How to Make Marshmallows: Tips for Beginners

You might never settle for store-bought 'mallows again.

Over the past year and a half, I&aposve become a little obsessed with marshmallows. I firmly believe that they are the cutest dessert ever. Am I right, or am I right?

I had no idea how to make marshmallows, and was very intimidated by the process the first time I read a recipe. Anything that calls for a candy thermometer just makes me want to throw up my hands in defeat before I&aposve even started--too much trouble, too much room for error, too much science. But as it turns out, marshmallows are very easy to make, and very forgiving.

How to Make Marshmallows

There are a few tips for how to make marshmallows that I wish I&aposd known my first time out. Lucky you, I&aposve done a lot of experimenting, so armed with this list, you&aposll be a pro before you even begin.

First, here are the basic steps for making marshmallows:

  1. Mix gelatin with water, set aside.
  2. Over the stovetop, melt sugar/corn syrup with water, then heat to 240 degrees Fahrenheit.
  3. Pour sugar mixture into the bowl with gelatin and beat until the batter is thick. Pour into a pan and let sit for 6 hours.
  4. Dust with powdered sugar and slice &aposem up!

Recipes vary a little, but that&aposs more or less all there is to it.

Tips For Making Marshmallows

You don&apost have to use corn syrup

Many recipes call for sugar and corn syrup, but if you don&apost want to use corn syrup, you can just use 2 cups of sugar and call it good. I&aposve tried both ways, and notice absolutely no difference in the taste. The one difference I have noticed is that the all-sugar ones tend to dry out a bit faster, so just be sure to get them in a resealable plastic bag after you slice them.

It&aposs not an exact science

Can I tell you a secret? I still have yet to buy a legit candy thermometer. I&aposve been using the thermometer from my home espresso machine&aposs steaming pitcher, which਍oesn&apost even go to 240 degrees Fahrenheit. It only goes to 220 degrees, so I just kinda guess. I tell you this to reassure you that you will not ruin a batch of marshmallow batter if you take your sugar mixture off the stove at 238 degrees. There is definitely some wiggle room, so do not let this part of the recipe intimidate you like it did me for so long.

Melt the sugar, then਌rank the heat

When you&aposre heating the sugar with the water on the stove top, you could technically get the temperature up to 240 degrees pretty quickly, but it&aposs important to keep it at medium heat until sugar melts completely before you increase the heat and pour everything with the gelatin. I&aposve noticed that the better job I do of getting sugar all good and melted, the fluffier my mallows turn out.

Beating the batter--getting the right consistency

First off, just know that even if you don&apost achieve the ideal consistency, your marshmallows will still turn out great. But here&aposs what you should be looking for to get the best results: When you stop the beaters and lift them up, batter dripping from the beaters should melt back into the batter somewhat slowly (it should take a least a few seconds). If it sinks back in immediately, keep beating.

Here&aposs another secret: the only time I&aposve ever screwed up making marshmallows was when I over-beat the batter. We&aposre not after meringue-like "stiff peaks," here. That&aposs a wee bit too much, and you might have a giant bowl-shaped marshmallow on your hands like I did. The best way I&aposve come up to describe the perfect consistency is to imagine pourable taffy. That&aposs the sweet spot! ( Also, be aware that standing mixers take much less time to beat the batter than hand beaters.)


How to Make Marshmallows: Tips for Beginners

You might never settle for store-bought 'mallows again.

Over the past year and a half, I&aposve become a little obsessed with marshmallows. I firmly believe that they are the cutest dessert ever. Am I right, or am I right?

I had no idea how to make marshmallows, and was very intimidated by the process the first time I read a recipe. Anything that calls for a candy thermometer just makes me want to throw up my hands in defeat before I&aposve even started--too much trouble, too much room for error, too much science. But as it turns out, marshmallows are very easy to make, and very forgiving.

How to Make Marshmallows

There are a few tips for how to make marshmallows that I wish I&aposd known my first time out. Lucky you, I&aposve done a lot of experimenting, so armed with this list, you&aposll be a pro before you even begin.

First, here are the basic steps for making marshmallows:

  1. Mix gelatin with water, set aside.
  2. Over the stovetop, melt sugar/corn syrup with water, then heat to 240 degrees Fahrenheit.
  3. Pour sugar mixture into the bowl with gelatin and beat until the batter is thick. Pour into a pan and let sit for 6 hours.
  4. Dust with powdered sugar and slice &aposem up!

Recipes vary a little, but that&aposs more or less all there is to it.

Tips For Making Marshmallows

You don&apost have to use corn syrup

Many recipes call for sugar and corn syrup, but if you don&apost want to use corn syrup, you can just use 2 cups of sugar and call it good. I&aposve tried both ways, and notice absolutely no difference in the taste. The one difference I have noticed is that the all-sugar ones tend to dry out a bit faster, so just be sure to get them in a resealable plastic bag after you slice them.

It&aposs not an exact science

Can I tell you a secret? I still have yet to buy a legit candy thermometer. I&aposve been using the thermometer from my home espresso machine&aposs steaming pitcher, which਍oesn&apost even go to 240 degrees Fahrenheit. It only goes to 220 degrees, so I just kinda guess. I tell you this to reassure you that you will not ruin a batch of marshmallow batter if you take your sugar mixture off the stove at 238 degrees. There is definitely some wiggle room, so do not let this part of the recipe intimidate you like it did me for so long.

Melt the sugar, then਌rank the heat

When you&aposre heating the sugar with the water on the stove top, you could technically get the temperature up to 240 degrees pretty quickly, but it&aposs important to keep it at medium heat until sugar melts completely before you increase the heat and pour everything with the gelatin. I&aposve noticed that the better job I do of getting sugar all good and melted, the fluffier my mallows turn out.

Beating the batter--getting the right consistency

First off, just know that even if you don&apost achieve the ideal consistency, your marshmallows will still turn out great. But here&aposs what you should be looking for to get the best results: When you stop the beaters and lift them up, batter dripping from the beaters should melt back into the batter somewhat slowly (it should take a least a few seconds). If it sinks back in immediately, keep beating.

Here&aposs another secret: the only time I&aposve ever screwed up making marshmallows was when I over-beat the batter. We&aposre not after meringue-like "stiff peaks," here. That&aposs a wee bit too much, and you might have a giant bowl-shaped marshmallow on your hands like I did. The best way I&aposve come up to describe the perfect consistency is to imagine pourable taffy. That&aposs the sweet spot! ( Also, be aware that standing mixers take much less time to beat the batter than hand beaters.)


How to Make Marshmallows: Tips for Beginners

You might never settle for store-bought 'mallows again.

Over the past year and a half, I&aposve become a little obsessed with marshmallows. I firmly believe that they are the cutest dessert ever. Am I right, or am I right?

I had no idea how to make marshmallows, and was very intimidated by the process the first time I read a recipe. Anything that calls for a candy thermometer just makes me want to throw up my hands in defeat before I&aposve even started--too much trouble, too much room for error, too much science. But as it turns out, marshmallows are very easy to make, and very forgiving.

How to Make Marshmallows

There are a few tips for how to make marshmallows that I wish I&aposd known my first time out. Lucky you, I&aposve done a lot of experimenting, so armed with this list, you&aposll be a pro before you even begin.

First, here are the basic steps for making marshmallows:

  1. Mix gelatin with water, set aside.
  2. Over the stovetop, melt sugar/corn syrup with water, then heat to 240 degrees Fahrenheit.
  3. Pour sugar mixture into the bowl with gelatin and beat until the batter is thick. Pour into a pan and let sit for 6 hours.
  4. Dust with powdered sugar and slice &aposem up!

Recipes vary a little, but that&aposs more or less all there is to it.

Tips For Making Marshmallows

You don&apost have to use corn syrup

Many recipes call for sugar and corn syrup, but if you don&apost want to use corn syrup, you can just use 2 cups of sugar and call it good. I&aposve tried both ways, and notice absolutely no difference in the taste. The one difference I have noticed is that the all-sugar ones tend to dry out a bit faster, so just be sure to get them in a resealable plastic bag after you slice them.

It&aposs not an exact science

Can I tell you a secret? I still have yet to buy a legit candy thermometer. I&aposve been using the thermometer from my home espresso machine&aposs steaming pitcher, which਍oesn&apost even go to 240 degrees Fahrenheit. It only goes to 220 degrees, so I just kinda guess. I tell you this to reassure you that you will not ruin a batch of marshmallow batter if you take your sugar mixture off the stove at 238 degrees. There is definitely some wiggle room, so do not let this part of the recipe intimidate you like it did me for so long.

Melt the sugar, then਌rank the heat

When you&aposre heating the sugar with the water on the stove top, you could technically get the temperature up to 240 degrees pretty quickly, but it&aposs important to keep it at medium heat until sugar melts completely before you increase the heat and pour everything with the gelatin. I&aposve noticed that the better job I do of getting sugar all good and melted, the fluffier my mallows turn out.

Beating the batter--getting the right consistency

First off, just know that even if you don&apost achieve the ideal consistency, your marshmallows will still turn out great. But here&aposs what you should be looking for to get the best results: When you stop the beaters and lift them up, batter dripping from the beaters should melt back into the batter somewhat slowly (it should take a least a few seconds). If it sinks back in immediately, keep beating.

Here&aposs another secret: the only time I&aposve ever screwed up making marshmallows was when I over-beat the batter. We&aposre not after meringue-like "stiff peaks," here. That&aposs a wee bit too much, and you might have a giant bowl-shaped marshmallow on your hands like I did. The best way I&aposve come up to describe the perfect consistency is to imagine pourable taffy. That&aposs the sweet spot! ( Also, be aware that standing mixers take much less time to beat the batter than hand beaters.)


How to Make Marshmallows: Tips for Beginners

You might never settle for store-bought 'mallows again.

Over the past year and a half, I&aposve become a little obsessed with marshmallows. I firmly believe that they are the cutest dessert ever. Am I right, or am I right?

I had no idea how to make marshmallows, and was very intimidated by the process the first time I read a recipe. Anything that calls for a candy thermometer just makes me want to throw up my hands in defeat before I&aposve even started--too much trouble, too much room for error, too much science. But as it turns out, marshmallows are very easy to make, and very forgiving.

How to Make Marshmallows

There are a few tips for how to make marshmallows that I wish I&aposd known my first time out. Lucky you, I&aposve done a lot of experimenting, so armed with this list, you&aposll be a pro before you even begin.

First, here are the basic steps for making marshmallows:

  1. Mix gelatin with water, set aside.
  2. Over the stovetop, melt sugar/corn syrup with water, then heat to 240 degrees Fahrenheit.
  3. Pour sugar mixture into the bowl with gelatin and beat until the batter is thick. Pour into a pan and let sit for 6 hours.
  4. Dust with powdered sugar and slice &aposem up!

Recipes vary a little, but that&aposs more or less all there is to it.

Tips For Making Marshmallows

You don&apost have to use corn syrup

Many recipes call for sugar and corn syrup, but if you don&apost want to use corn syrup, you can just use 2 cups of sugar and call it good. I&aposve tried both ways, and notice absolutely no difference in the taste. The one difference I have noticed is that the all-sugar ones tend to dry out a bit faster, so just be sure to get them in a resealable plastic bag after you slice them.

It&aposs not an exact science

Can I tell you a secret? I still have yet to buy a legit candy thermometer. I&aposve been using the thermometer from my home espresso machine&aposs steaming pitcher, which਍oesn&apost even go to 240 degrees Fahrenheit. It only goes to 220 degrees, so I just kinda guess. I tell you this to reassure you that you will not ruin a batch of marshmallow batter if you take your sugar mixture off the stove at 238 degrees. There is definitely some wiggle room, so do not let this part of the recipe intimidate you like it did me for so long.

Melt the sugar, then਌rank the heat

When you&aposre heating the sugar with the water on the stove top, you could technically get the temperature up to 240 degrees pretty quickly, but it&aposs important to keep it at medium heat until sugar melts completely before you increase the heat and pour everything with the gelatin. I&aposve noticed that the better job I do of getting sugar all good and melted, the fluffier my mallows turn out.

Beating the batter--getting the right consistency

First off, just know that even if you don&apost achieve the ideal consistency, your marshmallows will still turn out great. But here&aposs what you should be looking for to get the best results: When you stop the beaters and lift them up, batter dripping from the beaters should melt back into the batter somewhat slowly (it should take a least a few seconds). If it sinks back in immediately, keep beating.

Here&aposs another secret: the only time I&aposve ever screwed up making marshmallows was when I over-beat the batter. We&aposre not after meringue-like "stiff peaks," here. That&aposs a wee bit too much, and you might have a giant bowl-shaped marshmallow on your hands like I did. The best way I&aposve come up to describe the perfect consistency is to imagine pourable taffy. That&aposs the sweet spot! ( Also, be aware that standing mixers take much less time to beat the batter than hand beaters.)


How to Make Marshmallows: Tips for Beginners

You might never settle for store-bought 'mallows again.

Over the past year and a half, I&aposve become a little obsessed with marshmallows. I firmly believe that they are the cutest dessert ever. Am I right, or am I right?

I had no idea how to make marshmallows, and was very intimidated by the process the first time I read a recipe. Anything that calls for a candy thermometer just makes me want to throw up my hands in defeat before I&aposve even started--too much trouble, too much room for error, too much science. But as it turns out, marshmallows are very easy to make, and very forgiving.

How to Make Marshmallows

There are a few tips for how to make marshmallows that I wish I&aposd known my first time out. Lucky you, I&aposve done a lot of experimenting, so armed with this list, you&aposll be a pro before you even begin.

First, here are the basic steps for making marshmallows:

  1. Mix gelatin with water, set aside.
  2. Over the stovetop, melt sugar/corn syrup with water, then heat to 240 degrees Fahrenheit.
  3. Pour sugar mixture into the bowl with gelatin and beat until the batter is thick. Pour into a pan and let sit for 6 hours.
  4. Dust with powdered sugar and slice &aposem up!

Recipes vary a little, but that&aposs more or less all there is to it.

Tips For Making Marshmallows

You don&apost have to use corn syrup

Many recipes call for sugar and corn syrup, but if you don&apost want to use corn syrup, you can just use 2 cups of sugar and call it good. I&aposve tried both ways, and notice absolutely no difference in the taste. The one difference I have noticed is that the all-sugar ones tend to dry out a bit faster, so just be sure to get them in a resealable plastic bag after you slice them.

It&aposs not an exact science

Can I tell you a secret? I still have yet to buy a legit candy thermometer. I&aposve been using the thermometer from my home espresso machine&aposs steaming pitcher, which਍oesn&apost even go to 240 degrees Fahrenheit. It only goes to 220 degrees, so I just kinda guess. I tell you this to reassure you that you will not ruin a batch of marshmallow batter if you take your sugar mixture off the stove at 238 degrees. There is definitely some wiggle room, so do not let this part of the recipe intimidate you like it did me for so long.

Melt the sugar, then਌rank the heat

When you&aposre heating the sugar with the water on the stove top, you could technically get the temperature up to 240 degrees pretty quickly, but it&aposs important to keep it at medium heat until sugar melts completely before you increase the heat and pour everything with the gelatin. I&aposve noticed that the better job I do of getting sugar all good and melted, the fluffier my mallows turn out.

Beating the batter--getting the right consistency

First off, just know that even if you don&apost achieve the ideal consistency, your marshmallows will still turn out great. But here&aposs what you should be looking for to get the best results: When you stop the beaters and lift them up, batter dripping from the beaters should melt back into the batter somewhat slowly (it should take a least a few seconds). If it sinks back in immediately, keep beating.

Here&aposs another secret: the only time I&aposve ever screwed up making marshmallows was when I over-beat the batter. We&aposre not after meringue-like "stiff peaks," here. That&aposs a wee bit too much, and you might have a giant bowl-shaped marshmallow on your hands like I did. The best way I&aposve come up to describe the perfect consistency is to imagine pourable taffy. That&aposs the sweet spot! ( Also, be aware that standing mixers take much less time to beat the batter than hand beaters.)


How to Make Marshmallows: Tips for Beginners

You might never settle for store-bought 'mallows again.

Over the past year and a half, I&aposve become a little obsessed with marshmallows. I firmly believe that they are the cutest dessert ever. Am I right, or am I right?

I had no idea how to make marshmallows, and was very intimidated by the process the first time I read a recipe. Anything that calls for a candy thermometer just makes me want to throw up my hands in defeat before I&aposve even started--too much trouble, too much room for error, too much science. But as it turns out, marshmallows are very easy to make, and very forgiving.

How to Make Marshmallows

There are a few tips for how to make marshmallows that I wish I&aposd known my first time out. Lucky you, I&aposve done a lot of experimenting, so armed with this list, you&aposll be a pro before you even begin.

First, here are the basic steps for making marshmallows:

  1. Mix gelatin with water, set aside.
  2. Over the stovetop, melt sugar/corn syrup with water, then heat to 240 degrees Fahrenheit.
  3. Pour sugar mixture into the bowl with gelatin and beat until the batter is thick. Pour into a pan and let sit for 6 hours.
  4. Dust with powdered sugar and slice &aposem up!

Recipes vary a little, but that&aposs more or less all there is to it.

Tips For Making Marshmallows

You don&apost have to use corn syrup

Many recipes call for sugar and corn syrup, but if you don&apost want to use corn syrup, you can just use 2 cups of sugar and call it good. I&aposve tried both ways, and notice absolutely no difference in the taste. The one difference I have noticed is that the all-sugar ones tend to dry out a bit faster, so just be sure to get them in a resealable plastic bag after you slice them.

It&aposs not an exact science

Can I tell you a secret? I still have yet to buy a legit candy thermometer. I&aposve been using the thermometer from my home espresso machine&aposs steaming pitcher, which਍oesn&apost even go to 240 degrees Fahrenheit. It only goes to 220 degrees, so I just kinda guess. I tell you this to reassure you that you will not ruin a batch of marshmallow batter if you take your sugar mixture off the stove at 238 degrees. There is definitely some wiggle room, so do not let this part of the recipe intimidate you like it did me for so long.

Melt the sugar, then਌rank the heat

When you&aposre heating the sugar with the water on the stove top, you could technically get the temperature up to 240 degrees pretty quickly, but it&aposs important to keep it at medium heat until sugar melts completely before you increase the heat and pour everything with the gelatin. I&aposve noticed that the better job I do of getting sugar all good and melted, the fluffier my mallows turn out.

Beating the batter--getting the right consistency

First off, just know that even if you don&apost achieve the ideal consistency, your marshmallows will still turn out great. But here&aposs what you should be looking for to get the best results: When you stop the beaters and lift them up, batter dripping from the beaters should melt back into the batter somewhat slowly (it should take a least a few seconds). If it sinks back in immediately, keep beating.

Here&aposs another secret: the only time I&aposve ever screwed up making marshmallows was when I over-beat the batter. We&aposre not after meringue-like "stiff peaks," here. That&aposs a wee bit too much, and you might have a giant bowl-shaped marshmallow on your hands like I did. The best way I&aposve come up to describe the perfect consistency is to imagine pourable taffy. That&aposs the sweet spot! ( Also, be aware that standing mixers take much less time to beat the batter than hand beaters.)


How to Make Marshmallows: Tips for Beginners

You might never settle for store-bought 'mallows again.

Over the past year and a half, I&aposve become a little obsessed with marshmallows. I firmly believe that they are the cutest dessert ever. Am I right, or am I right?

I had no idea how to make marshmallows, and was very intimidated by the process the first time I read a recipe. Anything that calls for a candy thermometer just makes me want to throw up my hands in defeat before I&aposve even started--too much trouble, too much room for error, too much science. But as it turns out, marshmallows are very easy to make, and very forgiving.

How to Make Marshmallows

There are a few tips for how to make marshmallows that I wish I&aposd known my first time out. Lucky you, I&aposve done a lot of experimenting, so armed with this list, you&aposll be a pro before you even begin.

First, here are the basic steps for making marshmallows:

  1. Mix gelatin with water, set aside.
  2. Over the stovetop, melt sugar/corn syrup with water, then heat to 240 degrees Fahrenheit.
  3. Pour sugar mixture into the bowl with gelatin and beat until the batter is thick. Pour into a pan and let sit for 6 hours.
  4. Dust with powdered sugar and slice &aposem up!

Recipes vary a little, but that&aposs more or less all there is to it.

Tips For Making Marshmallows

You don&apost have to use corn syrup

Many recipes call for sugar and corn syrup, but if you don&apost want to use corn syrup, you can just use 2 cups of sugar and call it good. I&aposve tried both ways, and notice absolutely no difference in the taste. The one difference I have noticed is that the all-sugar ones tend to dry out a bit faster, so just be sure to get them in a resealable plastic bag after you slice them.

It&aposs not an exact science

Can I tell you a secret? I still have yet to buy a legit candy thermometer. I&aposve been using the thermometer from my home espresso machine&aposs steaming pitcher, which਍oesn&apost even go to 240 degrees Fahrenheit. It only goes to 220 degrees, so I just kinda guess. I tell you this to reassure you that you will not ruin a batch of marshmallow batter if you take your sugar mixture off the stove at 238 degrees. There is definitely some wiggle room, so do not let this part of the recipe intimidate you like it did me for so long.

Melt the sugar, then਌rank the heat

When you&aposre heating the sugar with the water on the stove top, you could technically get the temperature up to 240 degrees pretty quickly, but it&aposs important to keep it at medium heat until sugar melts completely before you increase the heat and pour everything with the gelatin. I&aposve noticed that the better job I do of getting sugar all good and melted, the fluffier my mallows turn out.

Beating the batter--getting the right consistency

First off, just know that even if you don&apost achieve the ideal consistency, your marshmallows will still turn out great. But here&aposs what you should be looking for to get the best results: When you stop the beaters and lift them up, batter dripping from the beaters should melt back into the batter somewhat slowly (it should take a least a few seconds). If it sinks back in immediately, keep beating.

Here&aposs another secret: the only time I&aposve ever screwed up making marshmallows was when I over-beat the batter. We&aposre not after meringue-like "stiff peaks," here. That&aposs a wee bit too much, and you might have a giant bowl-shaped marshmallow on your hands like I did. The best way I&aposve come up to describe the perfect consistency is to imagine pourable taffy. That&aposs the sweet spot! ( Also, be aware that standing mixers take much less time to beat the batter than hand beaters.)


How to Make Marshmallows: Tips for Beginners

You might never settle for store-bought 'mallows again.

Over the past year and a half, I&aposve become a little obsessed with marshmallows. I firmly believe that they are the cutest dessert ever. Am I right, or am I right?

I had no idea how to make marshmallows, and was very intimidated by the process the first time I read a recipe. Anything that calls for a candy thermometer just makes me want to throw up my hands in defeat before I&aposve even started--too much trouble, too much room for error, too much science. But as it turns out, marshmallows are very easy to make, and very forgiving.

How to Make Marshmallows

There are a few tips for how to make marshmallows that I wish I&aposd known my first time out. Lucky you, I&aposve done a lot of experimenting, so armed with this list, you&aposll be a pro before you even begin.

First, here are the basic steps for making marshmallows:

  1. Mix gelatin with water, set aside.
  2. Over the stovetop, melt sugar/corn syrup with water, then heat to 240 degrees Fahrenheit.
  3. Pour sugar mixture into the bowl with gelatin and beat until the batter is thick. Pour into a pan and let sit for 6 hours.
  4. Dust with powdered sugar and slice &aposem up!

Recipes vary a little, but that&aposs more or less all there is to it.

Tips For Making Marshmallows

You don&apost have to use corn syrup

Many recipes call for sugar and corn syrup, but if you don&apost want to use corn syrup, you can just use 2 cups of sugar and call it good. I&aposve tried both ways, and notice absolutely no difference in the taste. The one difference I have noticed is that the all-sugar ones tend to dry out a bit faster, so just be sure to get them in a resealable plastic bag after you slice them.

It&aposs not an exact science

Can I tell you a secret? I still have yet to buy a legit candy thermometer. I&aposve been using the thermometer from my home espresso machine&aposs steaming pitcher, which਍oesn&apost even go to 240 degrees Fahrenheit. It only goes to 220 degrees, so I just kinda guess. I tell you this to reassure you that you will not ruin a batch of marshmallow batter if you take your sugar mixture off the stove at 238 degrees. There is definitely some wiggle room, so do not let this part of the recipe intimidate you like it did me for so long.

Melt the sugar, then਌rank the heat

When you&aposre heating the sugar with the water on the stove top, you could technically get the temperature up to 240 degrees pretty quickly, but it&aposs important to keep it at medium heat until sugar melts completely before you increase the heat and pour everything with the gelatin. I&aposve noticed that the better job I do of getting sugar all good and melted, the fluffier my mallows turn out.

Beating the batter--getting the right consistency

First off, just know that even if you don&apost achieve the ideal consistency, your marshmallows will still turn out great. But here&aposs what you should be looking for to get the best results: When you stop the beaters and lift them up, batter dripping from the beaters should melt back into the batter somewhat slowly (it should take a least a few seconds). If it sinks back in immediately, keep beating.

Here&aposs another secret: the only time I&aposve ever screwed up making marshmallows was when I over-beat the batter. We&aposre not after meringue-like "stiff peaks," here. That&aposs a wee bit too much, and you might have a giant bowl-shaped marshmallow on your hands like I did. The best way I&aposve come up to describe the perfect consistency is to imagine pourable taffy. That&aposs the sweet spot! ( Also, be aware that standing mixers take much less time to beat the batter than hand beaters.)


How to Make Marshmallows: Tips for Beginners

You might never settle for store-bought 'mallows again.

Over the past year and a half, I&aposve become a little obsessed with marshmallows. I firmly believe that they are the cutest dessert ever. Am I right, or am I right?

I had no idea how to make marshmallows, and was very intimidated by the process the first time I read a recipe. Anything that calls for a candy thermometer just makes me want to throw up my hands in defeat before I&aposve even started--too much trouble, too much room for error, too much science. But as it turns out, marshmallows are very easy to make, and very forgiving.

How to Make Marshmallows

There are a few tips for how to make marshmallows that I wish I&aposd known my first time out. Lucky you, I&aposve done a lot of experimenting, so armed with this list, you&aposll be a pro before you even begin.

First, here are the basic steps for making marshmallows:

  1. Mix gelatin with water, set aside.
  2. Over the stovetop, melt sugar/corn syrup with water, then heat to 240 degrees Fahrenheit.
  3. Pour sugar mixture into the bowl with gelatin and beat until the batter is thick. Pour into a pan and let sit for 6 hours.
  4. Dust with powdered sugar and slice &aposem up!

Recipes vary a little, but that&aposs more or less all there is to it.

Tips For Making Marshmallows

You don&apost have to use corn syrup

Many recipes call for sugar and corn syrup, but if you don&apost want to use corn syrup, you can just use 2 cups of sugar and call it good. I&aposve tried both ways, and notice absolutely no difference in the taste. The one difference I have noticed is that the all-sugar ones tend to dry out a bit faster, so just be sure to get them in a resealable plastic bag after you slice them.

It&aposs not an exact science

Can I tell you a secret? I still have yet to buy a legit candy thermometer. I&aposve been using the thermometer from my home espresso machine&aposs steaming pitcher, which਍oesn&apost even go to 240 degrees Fahrenheit. It only goes to 220 degrees, so I just kinda guess. I tell you this to reassure you that you will not ruin a batch of marshmallow batter if you take your sugar mixture off the stove at 238 degrees. There is definitely some wiggle room, so do not let this part of the recipe intimidate you like it did me for so long.

Melt the sugar, then਌rank the heat

When you&aposre heating the sugar with the water on the stove top, you could technically get the temperature up to 240 degrees pretty quickly, but it&aposs important to keep it at medium heat until sugar melts completely before you increase the heat and pour everything with the gelatin. I&aposve noticed that the better job I do of getting sugar all good and melted, the fluffier my mallows turn out.

Beating the batter--getting the right consistency

First off, just know that even if you don&apost achieve the ideal consistency, your marshmallows will still turn out great. But here&aposs what you should be looking for to get the best results: When you stop the beaters and lift them up, batter dripping from the beaters should melt back into the batter somewhat slowly (it should take a least a few seconds). If it sinks back in immediately, keep beating.

Here&aposs another secret: the only time I&aposve ever screwed up making marshmallows was when I over-beat the batter. We&aposre not after meringue-like "stiff peaks," here. That&aposs a wee bit too much, and you might have a giant bowl-shaped marshmallow on your hands like I did. The best way I&aposve come up to describe the perfect consistency is to imagine pourable taffy. That&aposs the sweet spot! ( Also, be aware that standing mixers take much less time to beat the batter than hand beaters.)


How to Make Marshmallows: Tips for Beginners

You might never settle for store-bought 'mallows again.

Over the past year and a half, I&aposve become a little obsessed with marshmallows. I firmly believe that they are the cutest dessert ever. Am I right, or am I right?

I had no idea how to make marshmallows, and was very intimidated by the process the first time I read a recipe. Anything that calls for a candy thermometer just makes me want to throw up my hands in defeat before I&aposve even started--too much trouble, too much room for error, too much science. But as it turns out, marshmallows are very easy to make, and very forgiving.

How to Make Marshmallows

There are a few tips for how to make marshmallows that I wish I&aposd known my first time out. Lucky you, I&aposve done a lot of experimenting, so armed with this list, you&aposll be a pro before you even begin.

First, here are the basic steps for making marshmallows:

  1. Mix gelatin with water, set aside.
  2. Over the stovetop, melt sugar/corn syrup with water, then heat to 240 degrees Fahrenheit.
  3. Pour sugar mixture into the bowl with gelatin and beat until the batter is thick. Pour into a pan and let sit for 6 hours.
  4. Dust with powdered sugar and slice &aposem up!

Recipes vary a little, but that&aposs more or less all there is to it.

Tips For Making Marshmallows

You don&apost have to use corn syrup

Many recipes call for sugar and corn syrup, but if you don&apost want to use corn syrup, you can just use 2 cups of sugar and call it good. I&aposve tried both ways, and notice absolutely no difference in the taste. The one difference I have noticed is that the all-sugar ones tend to dry out a bit faster, so just be sure to get them in a resealable plastic bag after you slice them.

It&aposs not an exact science

Can I tell you a secret? I still have yet to buy a legit candy thermometer. I&aposve been using the thermometer from my home espresso machine&aposs steaming pitcher, which਍oesn&apost even go to 240 degrees Fahrenheit. It only goes to 220 degrees, so I just kinda guess. I tell you this to reassure you that you will not ruin a batch of marshmallow batter if you take your sugar mixture off the stove at 238 degrees. There is definitely some wiggle room, so do not let this part of the recipe intimidate you like it did me for so long.

Melt the sugar, then਌rank the heat

When you&aposre heating the sugar with the water on the stove top, you could technically get the temperature up to 240 degrees pretty quickly, but it&aposs important to keep it at medium heat until sugar melts completely before you increase the heat and pour everything with the gelatin. I&aposve noticed that the better job I do of getting sugar all good and melted, the fluffier my mallows turn out.

Beating the batter--getting the right consistency

First off, just know that even if you don&apost achieve the ideal consistency, your marshmallows will still turn out great. But here&aposs what you should be looking for to get the best results: When you stop the beaters and lift them up, batter dripping from the beaters should melt back into the batter somewhat slowly (it should take a least a few seconds). If it sinks back in immediately, keep beating.

Here&aposs another secret: the only time I&aposve ever screwed up making marshmallows was when I over-beat the batter. We&aposre not after meringue-like "stiff peaks," here. That&aposs a wee bit too much, and you might have a giant bowl-shaped marshmallow on your hands like I did. The best way I&aposve come up to describe the perfect consistency is to imagine pourable taffy. That&aposs the sweet spot! ( Also, be aware that standing mixers take much less time to beat the batter than hand beaters.)