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Eat a Lot of Seafood? You Also May Be Eating As Much As 11,000 Pieces of Plastic a Year


A study from researchers at the University of Ghent in Belgium proves that ocean pollution is getting out of hand

We thought that shrimp cocktail tasted a little crunchy.

Ocean pollution has gotten so out of hand, scientists are counting the amount of plastic that ends up in your seafood. That’s a lot of petroleum product.

But if you think to yourself, “hey, I don’t remember eating any plastic with my fish filet….” These plastic pieces are usually microscopic, but they can be harmful. However, the human body does pass around 99 percent of these plastic pieces without problem. It’s the one percent unknown that is a big question mark.

“Now we’ve established that they do enter our body and can stay there for quite a while, we do need to know the fate of the plastics,” Dr. Colin Janssen, who led the study, told Sky News. “Are chemicals leaching out of these plastics and then causing toxicity? We don’t know and actually we do need to know.”

By the end of the century regular seafood eaters will be consuming 780,000 pieces of plastic every year, according to the study, which means that 4,000 will be absorbed into the bloodstreams of future lifeforms.


Salmon Nutrition 101: Benefits, Calories, Risks and Recipes

A go-to protein source for many, it's clear to see why salmon is a nutritional star: It's uniquely rich in heart-healthy fats called omega-3 fatty acids.

It's also a fantastic source of protein, and can displace less healthy forms of the nutrient on your plate, like fatty beef or sausage. You'll also find a rich supply of nutrients in salmon that support brain, heart and bone health.

Salmon is one of the most-eaten types of seafood in the United States, surpassed only by shrimp and canned tuna. There are several types of salmon available, including Atlantic salmon and Pacific salmon such as chinook, coho, chum, sockeye and pink salmon, per the United States Geological Survey.

True Atlantic salmon is endangered, and commercial and recreational fishing for it is prohibited in the U.S., according to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries. For that reason, the Atlantic salmon you find in the supermarket is farm-raised.

It's currently recommended that Americans eat two fish-based meals per week, and salmon is a great way to anchor those meals.


Salmon Nutrition 101: Benefits, Calories, Risks and Recipes

A go-to protein source for many, it's clear to see why salmon is a nutritional star: It's uniquely rich in heart-healthy fats called omega-3 fatty acids.

It's also a fantastic source of protein, and can displace less healthy forms of the nutrient on your plate, like fatty beef or sausage. You'll also find a rich supply of nutrients in salmon that support brain, heart and bone health.

Salmon is one of the most-eaten types of seafood in the United States, surpassed only by shrimp and canned tuna. There are several types of salmon available, including Atlantic salmon and Pacific salmon such as chinook, coho, chum, sockeye and pink salmon, per the United States Geological Survey.

True Atlantic salmon is endangered, and commercial and recreational fishing for it is prohibited in the U.S., according to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries. For that reason, the Atlantic salmon you find in the supermarket is farm-raised.

It's currently recommended that Americans eat two fish-based meals per week, and salmon is a great way to anchor those meals.


Salmon Nutrition 101: Benefits, Calories, Risks and Recipes

A go-to protein source for many, it's clear to see why salmon is a nutritional star: It's uniquely rich in heart-healthy fats called omega-3 fatty acids.

It's also a fantastic source of protein, and can displace less healthy forms of the nutrient on your plate, like fatty beef or sausage. You'll also find a rich supply of nutrients in salmon that support brain, heart and bone health.

Salmon is one of the most-eaten types of seafood in the United States, surpassed only by shrimp and canned tuna. There are several types of salmon available, including Atlantic salmon and Pacific salmon such as chinook, coho, chum, sockeye and pink salmon, per the United States Geological Survey.

True Atlantic salmon is endangered, and commercial and recreational fishing for it is prohibited in the U.S., according to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries. For that reason, the Atlantic salmon you find in the supermarket is farm-raised.

It's currently recommended that Americans eat two fish-based meals per week, and salmon is a great way to anchor those meals.


Salmon Nutrition 101: Benefits, Calories, Risks and Recipes

A go-to protein source for many, it's clear to see why salmon is a nutritional star: It's uniquely rich in heart-healthy fats called omega-3 fatty acids.

It's also a fantastic source of protein, and can displace less healthy forms of the nutrient on your plate, like fatty beef or sausage. You'll also find a rich supply of nutrients in salmon that support brain, heart and bone health.

Salmon is one of the most-eaten types of seafood in the United States, surpassed only by shrimp and canned tuna. There are several types of salmon available, including Atlantic salmon and Pacific salmon such as chinook, coho, chum, sockeye and pink salmon, per the United States Geological Survey.

True Atlantic salmon is endangered, and commercial and recreational fishing for it is prohibited in the U.S., according to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries. For that reason, the Atlantic salmon you find in the supermarket is farm-raised.

It's currently recommended that Americans eat two fish-based meals per week, and salmon is a great way to anchor those meals.


Salmon Nutrition 101: Benefits, Calories, Risks and Recipes

A go-to protein source for many, it's clear to see why salmon is a nutritional star: It's uniquely rich in heart-healthy fats called omega-3 fatty acids.

It's also a fantastic source of protein, and can displace less healthy forms of the nutrient on your plate, like fatty beef or sausage. You'll also find a rich supply of nutrients in salmon that support brain, heart and bone health.

Salmon is one of the most-eaten types of seafood in the United States, surpassed only by shrimp and canned tuna. There are several types of salmon available, including Atlantic salmon and Pacific salmon such as chinook, coho, chum, sockeye and pink salmon, per the United States Geological Survey.

True Atlantic salmon is endangered, and commercial and recreational fishing for it is prohibited in the U.S., according to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries. For that reason, the Atlantic salmon you find in the supermarket is farm-raised.

It's currently recommended that Americans eat two fish-based meals per week, and salmon is a great way to anchor those meals.


Salmon Nutrition 101: Benefits, Calories, Risks and Recipes

A go-to protein source for many, it's clear to see why salmon is a nutritional star: It's uniquely rich in heart-healthy fats called omega-3 fatty acids.

It's also a fantastic source of protein, and can displace less healthy forms of the nutrient on your plate, like fatty beef or sausage. You'll also find a rich supply of nutrients in salmon that support brain, heart and bone health.

Salmon is one of the most-eaten types of seafood in the United States, surpassed only by shrimp and canned tuna. There are several types of salmon available, including Atlantic salmon and Pacific salmon such as chinook, coho, chum, sockeye and pink salmon, per the United States Geological Survey.

True Atlantic salmon is endangered, and commercial and recreational fishing for it is prohibited in the U.S., according to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries. For that reason, the Atlantic salmon you find in the supermarket is farm-raised.

It's currently recommended that Americans eat two fish-based meals per week, and salmon is a great way to anchor those meals.


Salmon Nutrition 101: Benefits, Calories, Risks and Recipes

A go-to protein source for many, it's clear to see why salmon is a nutritional star: It's uniquely rich in heart-healthy fats called omega-3 fatty acids.

It's also a fantastic source of protein, and can displace less healthy forms of the nutrient on your plate, like fatty beef or sausage. You'll also find a rich supply of nutrients in salmon that support brain, heart and bone health.

Salmon is one of the most-eaten types of seafood in the United States, surpassed only by shrimp and canned tuna. There are several types of salmon available, including Atlantic salmon and Pacific salmon such as chinook, coho, chum, sockeye and pink salmon, per the United States Geological Survey.

True Atlantic salmon is endangered, and commercial and recreational fishing for it is prohibited in the U.S., according to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries. For that reason, the Atlantic salmon you find in the supermarket is farm-raised.

It's currently recommended that Americans eat two fish-based meals per week, and salmon is a great way to anchor those meals.


Salmon Nutrition 101: Benefits, Calories, Risks and Recipes

A go-to protein source for many, it's clear to see why salmon is a nutritional star: It's uniquely rich in heart-healthy fats called omega-3 fatty acids.

It's also a fantastic source of protein, and can displace less healthy forms of the nutrient on your plate, like fatty beef or sausage. You'll also find a rich supply of nutrients in salmon that support brain, heart and bone health.

Salmon is one of the most-eaten types of seafood in the United States, surpassed only by shrimp and canned tuna. There are several types of salmon available, including Atlantic salmon and Pacific salmon such as chinook, coho, chum, sockeye and pink salmon, per the United States Geological Survey.

True Atlantic salmon is endangered, and commercial and recreational fishing for it is prohibited in the U.S., according to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries. For that reason, the Atlantic salmon you find in the supermarket is farm-raised.

It's currently recommended that Americans eat two fish-based meals per week, and salmon is a great way to anchor those meals.


Salmon Nutrition 101: Benefits, Calories, Risks and Recipes

A go-to protein source for many, it's clear to see why salmon is a nutritional star: It's uniquely rich in heart-healthy fats called omega-3 fatty acids.

It's also a fantastic source of protein, and can displace less healthy forms of the nutrient on your plate, like fatty beef or sausage. You'll also find a rich supply of nutrients in salmon that support brain, heart and bone health.

Salmon is one of the most-eaten types of seafood in the United States, surpassed only by shrimp and canned tuna. There are several types of salmon available, including Atlantic salmon and Pacific salmon such as chinook, coho, chum, sockeye and pink salmon, per the United States Geological Survey.

True Atlantic salmon is endangered, and commercial and recreational fishing for it is prohibited in the U.S., according to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries. For that reason, the Atlantic salmon you find in the supermarket is farm-raised.

It's currently recommended that Americans eat two fish-based meals per week, and salmon is a great way to anchor those meals.


Salmon Nutrition 101: Benefits, Calories, Risks and Recipes

A go-to protein source for many, it's clear to see why salmon is a nutritional star: It's uniquely rich in heart-healthy fats called omega-3 fatty acids.

It's also a fantastic source of protein, and can displace less healthy forms of the nutrient on your plate, like fatty beef or sausage. You'll also find a rich supply of nutrients in salmon that support brain, heart and bone health.

Salmon is one of the most-eaten types of seafood in the United States, surpassed only by shrimp and canned tuna. There are several types of salmon available, including Atlantic salmon and Pacific salmon such as chinook, coho, chum, sockeye and pink salmon, per the United States Geological Survey.

True Atlantic salmon is endangered, and commercial and recreational fishing for it is prohibited in the U.S., according to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries. For that reason, the Atlantic salmon you find in the supermarket is farm-raised.

It's currently recommended that Americans eat two fish-based meals per week, and salmon is a great way to anchor those meals.


Watch the video: MUKBANGERS DIPPING THEIR FOOD IN WAY TOO MUCH SAUCE MESSY EATING (November 2021).