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Which Sodas Have The Most Caffeine?


These five popular sodas contain a ton of caffeine

These sodas will surely give you that caffeine boost you need.

When you’re looking for a kick of caffeine, it helps to know which drinks contain the most. It may surprise you that some big name brand sodas like Coca-Cola aren’t packed with the most caffeine per can, and that other lesser-known sodas like Diet RC contain high levels of caffeine.

The following list of caffeine levels in each soda are given in milligrams per 12-ounce can:

#5 Diet RC — 47.3mg Caffeine

Diet RC will give you that boost you need.

Photo Credit: Flickr/Phillip

#4 Cheerwine — 47.5mg Caffeine

Cheers to Cheerwine because it’s loaded with caffeine.

Photo Credit: Flickr/Michael Bentley

#3 Tab — 48.1mg Caffeine

Pop open a Tab and take a big gulp for a boost of energy.

Photo Credit: Flickr/Mike Mozart

#2 Diet Cheerwine — 48.1mg Caffeine

With fewer calories, Diet Cheerwine actually contains more caffeine than classic Cheerwine.

Photo Credit: Flickr/Amanda

#1 Pepsi One — 57.1mg Caffeine

The winner for the soda with the highest level of caffeine, Pepsi One, is sure to wake you up every time you crack one open.

Photo Credit: Flickr/Joel Olives


Coffee Soda: The Most Refreshing Way to Get Your Caffeine Fix

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To revist this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories.

There are an almost overwhelming number of ways to get your coffee fix these days—from good old drip to nitro—but there's one more permutation to add to your caffeine rotation: coffee soda. This refreshing alternative is, essentially, coffee mixed with soda water a bubbly, iced Americano if you will. And it's the most summer-appropriate way to get your morning buzz.

Baristas are treating these concoctions like mixed drinks and adding everything from bitters to a splash of citrus to create really inventive cups. Sound a bit strange? Don’t knock it until you try it. The citrus and coffee combination has become common in some spots overseas: “In Italy, you can find someone squeezing a lemon into their espresso [and] Australian cafes have been known to create a Sparky [lime with double shot espresso],” says Thi Lam, co-owner of Keepers Coffee Soda—a canned mix of coffee, soda, and citrus that's just about to hit the market Stateside. The combination of citrus and coffee works because "coffee is actually a fruit that can contain hundreds of different flavor notes depending on the region and elevation where they are grown,” says Lam. And adding a splash of lemon, for example, can really magnify more subtle, natural citrus notes in the beans.

“These kinds of drinks seem like a natural evolution for coffee,” says Methodical Coffee’s Co-Owner, Marco Suarez. “Cold sugary drinks like Frappuccinos were a natural evolution from Starbucks’ lattes and coffee sodas seem like a natural evolution for third wave coffee shops who focus on more complex flavors. As for coffee sodas specifically, it’s becoming more common to roast coffees in a way to highlight the bean’s brighter tones and when that’s mixed with the crisp effervescence of a soda, it makes for a super refreshing summer drink.”


Fizzy drinks: The best and worst revealed

Jessica Dady December 26, 2019 12:57 am

Do you know which fizzy drinks are the best for your diet, and which are the worst? Find out which fizzy drink scored the highest and is the most healthy drink in our best and worst round-up.

Coke, Fanta, Red Bull, Dr Pepper – whichever your choice of fizzy drink, it’s safe to say they go down a treat with the kids and are a great energy-booster for when the 4 o’clock slump hits. But have you ever considered just how much damage that can of pop could be doing to your diet? And do you know which fizzy drinks contain the most calories?

Whether you like to sip on a Diet Coke, love Irn Bru or are a big fan of Lilt, not all fizzy drinks are the same when it comes to calories and sugar – in fact, it’s easy to fall into the trap of forgetting they count towards your daily calories at all!

Did you know one glass of a particular fizzy drink contains more than seven teaspoons of sugar? Seven! Or that it would take a 10-minute bike ride to burn off the worst culprit’s calories? Some fizzy drinks also contain nasty hidden extras like E-numbers, caffeine and sweeteners, which aren’t great for your health or your diet.

A new survey from Robinsons fruit squash, has found that 62% of UK adults say their children copy their drinking habits – for both healthy and unhealthy drinks – and 8% of children drink fizzy drinks every single day.

Tom Jenane, nutrition and fitness expert said, “Soft drinks are one of the leading factors in the rise in obesity in the UK, with the incredibly high levels of sugar being the main culprit. Even when you’re eating something a bit naughty, it will normally contain some vitamins or minerals which are good for you, but there is nothing healthy in a fizzy drink.”

Tom continued, “You can also reach your maximum recommended daily intake of sugar within a single can of some fizzy drinks.

“The higher the item is on the glycaemic index, more it will create a rapid increase in blood glucose and will be broken down very quickly, while sugary drinks are one of the worst offenders. This is without even considering the effects on your teeth, as they are highly acidic, which will cause erosions to your enamel.

A high sugar intake, leading to weight gain, is connected to various health issues such as diabetes type 2 and heart disease.”


Search Results

Most Popular Foods This list of foods is ranked by popularity, with 1 being most popular. The foods most frequently viewed are listed first.

Nutrient Search If you search by a single criterion, the food with the most (or least) of that nutrient will be at the top of the list. If you search for foods highest or lowest in multiple nutrients, we determine a composite score by multiplying the rankings for each individual criterion. For example, if you search for foods high in calcium and magnesium, a food ranked #1 for calcium and #10 for magnesium would have a composite score of 10. A food ranked #5 for calcium and #5 for magnesium would have a composite score of 25. The results are ranked according to their composite scores.

Search by Caloric Ratio Caloric Ratio search results are ranked and sorted by proximity to the ratio you selected. Foods with a ratio of Carbohydrates:Fats:Protein closest to the one selected are shown first, with a rank of 1 being the closest match.

Search by Fullness Factor TM and ND Rating (Nutritional Target Map TM ) These search results are ranked and sorted by proximity to the map point that you selected, reflecting foods with a certain ND Rating (nutrient density) and Fullness Factor TM (energy density). Foods closest to the point you selected will appear first, with a rank of 1 being the closest match.

Better Choices for Healthy Weight Loss The Better Choices approach predicts that foods closer to the top of this list are more filling and more nutritious per calorie than foods farther down the list, and therefore are better for healthy-weight-loss diets. This prediction is based on the nutrient content of these foods, but does not take into account your individual needs.

Better Choices for Optimum Health Foods closer to the top of this list have more nutrients per calorie than foods farther down the list and are therefore a better choice for optimum health.

Better Choices for Healthy Weight Gain The Better Choices approach predicts that foods closer to the top of this list will be less filling and/or more nutritious per calorie than foods farther down the list and therefore better for weight-gain diets. This prediction is based on the nutrient content of these foods, but does not take into account your individual needs.

Lowest eGL eGL (Estimated Glycemic Load TM ) estimates how much a food is likely to increase your blood sugar level. Foods closer to the top of this list are likely to cause less of an increase in blood sugar than foods farther down the list.

Highest eGL eGL (Estimated Glycemic Load TM ) estimates how much a food is likely to increase your blood sugar level. Foods closer to the top of this list are likely to cause more of an increase in blood sugar than foods farther down the list.

Lowest IF (Inflammation Factor) Rating TM The IF Rating TM predicts a food's effect on the body's inflammatory response. Foods closer to the top of this list are more likely to provoke inflammation (or less likely to reduce inflammation).

Highest IF (Inflammation Factor) Rating TM The IF Rating TM predicts a food's effect on the body's inflammatory response. Foods closer to the top of this list are more likely to help reduce inflammation (or less likely to provoke inflammation).

Protein Complement Rankings are determined by multiplying the rankings for each individual criterion.

For example, a food ranked #1 for being highest in the first amino acid and #10 for being lowest in the second would have a composite score of 10.

A food ranked #5 for being highest in the first amino acid and #5 for being lowest in the second would have a composite score of 25.


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With its memorable cartoon commercials, Red Bull made the top 10 list of America's most famous beverages.

Not just the elementary school game where you'd put your thumbs up, 7UP is also the country's ninth-most-famous beverage. Like Sprite, 7UP promises a lemon-lime flavor and no caffeine.


Colas and Pepper Flavors

The sodium level in regular colas is generally the same in both caffeinated and noncaffeinated varieties. Drinking a 12-ounce can of cola gives you around 12 milligrams of sodium. Low-calorie caffeinated diet colas can have up to 24 milligrams of sodium in 12 ounces. But usually noncaffeinated diet colas have about the same 12 milligrams of sodium as regular colas. Regular caffeinated pepper-type soft drinks have 36 milligrams of sodium in 12 ounces. If you prefer caffeinated low-calorie pepper-flavored soft drinks, you'll get up to 60 milligrams of sodium, while noncaffeinated diet varieties have around 12 milligrams per 12-ounce serving.


1977 – 1978: Dr. Pepper

Remember when I mentioned Mr. Pibb? It was trying to complete with Dr. Pepper, but that’s a hard battle to win. The late 1970s was especially good for Dr. Pepper due to their memorable commercials.

The “I’m a Pepper” commercials started airing — this one aired in 1977 — which had an infectious jingle.

They also reportedly started airing ads before theatrical releases, which was much more of a rarity back then. Never deny the power of a well-placed ad.


Kombucha

Willow Jarosh, a registered dietician-nutritionist and health expert for Health-Ade Kombucha drink brand, told Bustle: "Kombucha uses tea as its fermentation medium, so drinkers get the benefits of L-theanine working along with the caffeine to create a more even energy without jitters.

"But, kombucha contains less caffeine per cup than a plain old cup of tea, so for people who want a mild and gentle caffeine boost, kombucha is great. In addition, it delivers probiotic bacteria as well as a wake-you-up fizziness," she adds.


Caffeine Free Dr Pepper

Established in 1885 by Charles Alderton in Waco, Texas, this brand has an iconic history of delivering satisfying refreshment.

This caffeine-free version of the soda delivers the same original recipe of 23 flavors blended into one unique drink with no caffeine. As a side note, there is a popular belief which is remarkably long-lived, since about 1930, that Dr Pepper contains prune juice, but it doesn’t.

Ingredients – high fructose corn syrup, carbonated water, phosphoric acid, caramel color, sodium benzoate (preservative), and artificial and natural flavors.


Soft drinks that contain between 40 and 60 mg of caffeine per 12-oz. serving include Diet Mountain Dew Code Red and Diet Mountain Dew, both of which contain 54 mg of caffeine per serving, according to Good Housekeeping, and Mello Yello, which contains 53 mg. Many caffeinated beverages contain between 40 and 50 mg of caffeine, including Diet Coke, TaB, Diet Dr. Pepper and Dr. Pepper.

Soft drinks containing less than 40 mg of caffeine per 12-oz. serving include Coca-Cola and Coca-Cola Zero, which both contain 35 mg of caffeine, according to the Mayo Clinic. Diet Pepsi and Pepsi contain between 36 and 38 mg of caffeine per serving. Pepsi Wild Cherry contains 38 mg. Barq's Root Beer contains about 22 mg of caffeine per 12-oz. serving.