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Carl's Jr. Is Pitching Satirical 'Million Dollar Ideas' to Amazon Over Twitter


Can we at least make the lunch registry a thing?

Ken Wolter / Dreamstime

Carl’s Jr. is going on a tweeting bender in an attempt to get Amazon to buy out the brand. Every hour for 24 hours starting on October 9 at midnight, the fast-food chain is tweeting out “million dollar ideas” for the supposed partnership.

So far, some pitches include a “Tender Button,” which would give on-demand chicken tenders each time it’s pressed; a “Self-driving Restaurant,” a traveling Carl’s Jr. restaurant on wheels; “Spaceshakes,” hand-scooped shake pouches for outer space transit; and a “Lunch Registry,” which is sort of like a baby or wedding registry — but people pay for your lunch instead.

Each tweet is followed by a heavy amount of exclamation points and the hashtag “#AmazonBuyUs.” They’ve also tagged Amazon’s national Twitter page in every post.

“This is about generating a conversation around a partnership,” Carl’s Jr. and Hardee’s chief marketing officer Jeff Jenkins told USA TODAY. “The tweets are obviously a start to try and see where the dialogue goes… have a lot of fun with it, and see if they find the spirit of it as fun as we do.”

The Daily Meal has reached out to Amazon for comment.

For more fast-food fun, check out the discontinued menu items we miss the most.


Carl's Jr. Is Pitching Satirical 'Million Dollar Ideas' to Amazon Over Twitter - Recipes

- Preheat the oven as I'm driving home

- Alert me when my laundry˽ishes are done

- Alert me if my air filter needs replaced.

- Manage my AC/Heating for maximum energy efficiency.

- Real time energy usage monitoring.

- Turn on/off lights when I arrive/leave.

Oven preheating: takes 15 minutes when I get home barely enough time to prepare whatever I'm putting in there.

Loud dry˽ishes alerts: I don't see how it's useful. If I'm not home it doesn't matter to me if the laundry or dishes are done or not as I can't do anything about it.

Any filter changes: almost all either work on specific timing intervals, so just set 5 years worth of reminders in your phone, or they detect pressure differentials and a service light can just turn on when the machine needs a new filter.

Manage AC for max efficiency: nothing a programmable thermostat can't handle unless you have really crazy schedules but even then the savings are minuscule.

Turning on/off lights: okey, could be useful.

For me, turning on lights etc are such a small part of my day, not to mention my 'needs' as to be completely insignificant.

If the machines would do something like sort, wash and fold the laundry that would be something, but as it is I people just buy them for novelty value.

And I am surprised how often I actually use little things like adjusting the lighting, finding my phone or keys, or even raising and lowering blinds.

Just yelling, "Alexa, turn off all the lights" as I walk out the door, or "Alexa, set the house temperature to 72" as I lay down for bed has really cut out a lot of fastidious things that by themselves doesn't matter much, but added up use a surprising amount of time.

Saying, "why would I want something to do x or y?" Sounds just like people I remember back in the 90s that said, why would I want email when I can just call? And then, why would I use text messaging when I can just email.

I wouldn't want to have my oven on when I am not home- it might just be me but it seems dangerous to leave a hot oven unattended. I always check the oven before starting it to make sure it's empty. I guess I am somewhat paranoid that something somehow ended up in there.

The rest of the stuff I, personally, don't see any value in other than energy efficiency and that doesn't really require networking. My fridge is constantly telling me that I need a new water and air filters but I just ignore it and assume it's a ploy to sell more filters (like printers that report you need more ink despite printing fine).

Water filters can build up bacteria (listeria is not a fun thing - there are others, too - some pretty bad) this can cause everything from a "funky smell" to "go to emergency room or die". That said, tap water in most municipalities is pretty damn clean, and you can run without a filter but if you don't want to change the filter, then do just that - remove the filter, so that you don't give the bacteria a nice growth area. If you do change the filter, don't go more than a year between changes at most. Most filters are cheap enough, usually less than $50 USD.

As far as the air filter - well, I've never heard of one on a fridge - but if you have one, it's probably to filter the air before it gets to the fan that cools the compressor. If you let it get super dirty, it won't move the air, and your compressor will be overheated/overworked, and it's life will be shortened, or it will fail - or the breaker on the fridge (know where your's is?) will trip. And don't take the filter off and just run filterless - because now the cooling coils will act as the filter, and they are anything but easy to clean (because if you don't, again failures will eventually occur - nbtw, that they sell a special fridge coil cleaning brush that looks like a very narrow bottle brush).

If you're talking about other filters in your house (HVAC) - then you want to change those too, fairly regularly. If you don't, again, you'll be overworking your A˼ unit, plus the air won't be moved around effectively (making the unit run longer to cool/heat - increasing your bill). Plus, those filters get pretty nasty too - and that stuff doesn't stay on the filter.

They make reusable filters - you cut them with scissors to match the filter opening, then when you are ready to clean them, you take them outside and run a water from a sprayer hose "backwards" thru the filter, then let ɾm air dry. That can be a cheaper and easier alternative to holding on to a box or two of filters (though such filters are pretty cheap).

Finally - note that on many cars (not all!) there is a "cabin air filter". Check your manual on how to replace it most people don't know about that filter, but it isn't difficult to change out. Costs of course are variable, depending on the car. Again, though, if you don't replace it regularly, your cabin heating˼ooling will suffer, air flow will be reduced, the fan motor will have to work harder, etc.

Basically - for air filter, check them now and then. When they look like they are getting overly fuzzy, or you can't see thru ɾm - change them out.

I don't doubt that filters should be changed regularly but I don't trust LG to tell me when.


Carl's Jr. Is Pitching Satirical 'Million Dollar Ideas' to Amazon Over Twitter - Recipes

- Preheat the oven as I'm driving home

- Alert me when my laundry˽ishes are done

- Alert me if my air filter needs replaced.

- Manage my AC/Heating for maximum energy efficiency.

- Real time energy usage monitoring.

- Turn on/off lights when I arrive/leave.

Oven preheating: takes 15 minutes when I get home barely enough time to prepare whatever I'm putting in there.

Loud dry˽ishes alerts: I don't see how it's useful. If I'm not home it doesn't matter to me if the laundry or dishes are done or not as I can't do anything about it.

Any filter changes: almost all either work on specific timing intervals, so just set 5 years worth of reminders in your phone, or they detect pressure differentials and a service light can just turn on when the machine needs a new filter.

Manage AC for max efficiency: nothing a programmable thermostat can't handle unless you have really crazy schedules but even then the savings are minuscule.

Turning on/off lights: okey, could be useful.

For me, turning on lights etc are such a small part of my day, not to mention my 'needs' as to be completely insignificant.

If the machines would do something like sort, wash and fold the laundry that would be something, but as it is I people just buy them for novelty value.

And I am surprised how often I actually use little things like adjusting the lighting, finding my phone or keys, or even raising and lowering blinds.

Just yelling, "Alexa, turn off all the lights" as I walk out the door, or "Alexa, set the house temperature to 72" as I lay down for bed has really cut out a lot of fastidious things that by themselves doesn't matter much, but added up use a surprising amount of time.

Saying, "why would I want something to do x or y?" Sounds just like people I remember back in the 90s that said, why would I want email when I can just call? And then, why would I use text messaging when I can just email.

I wouldn't want to have my oven on when I am not home- it might just be me but it seems dangerous to leave a hot oven unattended. I always check the oven before starting it to make sure it's empty. I guess I am somewhat paranoid that something somehow ended up in there.

The rest of the stuff I, personally, don't see any value in other than energy efficiency and that doesn't really require networking. My fridge is constantly telling me that I need a new water and air filters but I just ignore it and assume it's a ploy to sell more filters (like printers that report you need more ink despite printing fine).

Water filters can build up bacteria (listeria is not a fun thing - there are others, too - some pretty bad) this can cause everything from a "funky smell" to "go to emergency room or die". That said, tap water in most municipalities is pretty damn clean, and you can run without a filter but if you don't want to change the filter, then do just that - remove the filter, so that you don't give the bacteria a nice growth area. If you do change the filter, don't go more than a year between changes at most. Most filters are cheap enough, usually less than $50 USD.

As far as the air filter - well, I've never heard of one on a fridge - but if you have one, it's probably to filter the air before it gets to the fan that cools the compressor. If you let it get super dirty, it won't move the air, and your compressor will be overheated/overworked, and it's life will be shortened, or it will fail - or the breaker on the fridge (know where your's is?) will trip. And don't take the filter off and just run filterless - because now the cooling coils will act as the filter, and they are anything but easy to clean (because if you don't, again failures will eventually occur - nbtw, that they sell a special fridge coil cleaning brush that looks like a very narrow bottle brush).

If you're talking about other filters in your house (HVAC) - then you want to change those too, fairly regularly. If you don't, again, you'll be overworking your A˼ unit, plus the air won't be moved around effectively (making the unit run longer to cool/heat - increasing your bill). Plus, those filters get pretty nasty too - and that stuff doesn't stay on the filter.

They make reusable filters - you cut them with scissors to match the filter opening, then when you are ready to clean them, you take them outside and run a water from a sprayer hose "backwards" thru the filter, then let ɾm air dry. That can be a cheaper and easier alternative to holding on to a box or two of filters (though such filters are pretty cheap).

Finally - note that on many cars (not all!) there is a "cabin air filter". Check your manual on how to replace it most people don't know about that filter, but it isn't difficult to change out. Costs of course are variable, depending on the car. Again, though, if you don't replace it regularly, your cabin heating˼ooling will suffer, air flow will be reduced, the fan motor will have to work harder, etc.

Basically - for air filter, check them now and then. When they look like they are getting overly fuzzy, or you can't see thru ɾm - change them out.

I don't doubt that filters should be changed regularly but I don't trust LG to tell me when.


Carl's Jr. Is Pitching Satirical 'Million Dollar Ideas' to Amazon Over Twitter - Recipes

- Preheat the oven as I'm driving home

- Alert me when my laundry˽ishes are done

- Alert me if my air filter needs replaced.

- Manage my AC/Heating for maximum energy efficiency.

- Real time energy usage monitoring.

- Turn on/off lights when I arrive/leave.

Oven preheating: takes 15 minutes when I get home barely enough time to prepare whatever I'm putting in there.

Loud dry˽ishes alerts: I don't see how it's useful. If I'm not home it doesn't matter to me if the laundry or dishes are done or not as I can't do anything about it.

Any filter changes: almost all either work on specific timing intervals, so just set 5 years worth of reminders in your phone, or they detect pressure differentials and a service light can just turn on when the machine needs a new filter.

Manage AC for max efficiency: nothing a programmable thermostat can't handle unless you have really crazy schedules but even then the savings are minuscule.

Turning on/off lights: okey, could be useful.

For me, turning on lights etc are such a small part of my day, not to mention my 'needs' as to be completely insignificant.

If the machines would do something like sort, wash and fold the laundry that would be something, but as it is I people just buy them for novelty value.

And I am surprised how often I actually use little things like adjusting the lighting, finding my phone or keys, or even raising and lowering blinds.

Just yelling, "Alexa, turn off all the lights" as I walk out the door, or "Alexa, set the house temperature to 72" as I lay down for bed has really cut out a lot of fastidious things that by themselves doesn't matter much, but added up use a surprising amount of time.

Saying, "why would I want something to do x or y?" Sounds just like people I remember back in the 90s that said, why would I want email when I can just call? And then, why would I use text messaging when I can just email.

I wouldn't want to have my oven on when I am not home- it might just be me but it seems dangerous to leave a hot oven unattended. I always check the oven before starting it to make sure it's empty. I guess I am somewhat paranoid that something somehow ended up in there.

The rest of the stuff I, personally, don't see any value in other than energy efficiency and that doesn't really require networking. My fridge is constantly telling me that I need a new water and air filters but I just ignore it and assume it's a ploy to sell more filters (like printers that report you need more ink despite printing fine).

Water filters can build up bacteria (listeria is not a fun thing - there are others, too - some pretty bad) this can cause everything from a "funky smell" to "go to emergency room or die". That said, tap water in most municipalities is pretty damn clean, and you can run without a filter but if you don't want to change the filter, then do just that - remove the filter, so that you don't give the bacteria a nice growth area. If you do change the filter, don't go more than a year between changes at most. Most filters are cheap enough, usually less than $50 USD.

As far as the air filter - well, I've never heard of one on a fridge - but if you have one, it's probably to filter the air before it gets to the fan that cools the compressor. If you let it get super dirty, it won't move the air, and your compressor will be overheated/overworked, and it's life will be shortened, or it will fail - or the breaker on the fridge (know where your's is?) will trip. And don't take the filter off and just run filterless - because now the cooling coils will act as the filter, and they are anything but easy to clean (because if you don't, again failures will eventually occur - nbtw, that they sell a special fridge coil cleaning brush that looks like a very narrow bottle brush).

If you're talking about other filters in your house (HVAC) - then you want to change those too, fairly regularly. If you don't, again, you'll be overworking your A˼ unit, plus the air won't be moved around effectively (making the unit run longer to cool/heat - increasing your bill). Plus, those filters get pretty nasty too - and that stuff doesn't stay on the filter.

They make reusable filters - you cut them with scissors to match the filter opening, then when you are ready to clean them, you take them outside and run a water from a sprayer hose "backwards" thru the filter, then let ɾm air dry. That can be a cheaper and easier alternative to holding on to a box or two of filters (though such filters are pretty cheap).

Finally - note that on many cars (not all!) there is a "cabin air filter". Check your manual on how to replace it most people don't know about that filter, but it isn't difficult to change out. Costs of course are variable, depending on the car. Again, though, if you don't replace it regularly, your cabin heating˼ooling will suffer, air flow will be reduced, the fan motor will have to work harder, etc.

Basically - for air filter, check them now and then. When they look like they are getting overly fuzzy, or you can't see thru ɾm - change them out.

I don't doubt that filters should be changed regularly but I don't trust LG to tell me when.


Carl's Jr. Is Pitching Satirical 'Million Dollar Ideas' to Amazon Over Twitter - Recipes

- Preheat the oven as I'm driving home

- Alert me when my laundry˽ishes are done

- Alert me if my air filter needs replaced.

- Manage my AC/Heating for maximum energy efficiency.

- Real time energy usage monitoring.

- Turn on/off lights when I arrive/leave.

Oven preheating: takes 15 minutes when I get home barely enough time to prepare whatever I'm putting in there.

Loud dry˽ishes alerts: I don't see how it's useful. If I'm not home it doesn't matter to me if the laundry or dishes are done or not as I can't do anything about it.

Any filter changes: almost all either work on specific timing intervals, so just set 5 years worth of reminders in your phone, or they detect pressure differentials and a service light can just turn on when the machine needs a new filter.

Manage AC for max efficiency: nothing a programmable thermostat can't handle unless you have really crazy schedules but even then the savings are minuscule.

Turning on/off lights: okey, could be useful.

For me, turning on lights etc are such a small part of my day, not to mention my 'needs' as to be completely insignificant.

If the machines would do something like sort, wash and fold the laundry that would be something, but as it is I people just buy them for novelty value.

And I am surprised how often I actually use little things like adjusting the lighting, finding my phone or keys, or even raising and lowering blinds.

Just yelling, "Alexa, turn off all the lights" as I walk out the door, or "Alexa, set the house temperature to 72" as I lay down for bed has really cut out a lot of fastidious things that by themselves doesn't matter much, but added up use a surprising amount of time.

Saying, "why would I want something to do x or y?" Sounds just like people I remember back in the 90s that said, why would I want email when I can just call? And then, why would I use text messaging when I can just email.

I wouldn't want to have my oven on when I am not home- it might just be me but it seems dangerous to leave a hot oven unattended. I always check the oven before starting it to make sure it's empty. I guess I am somewhat paranoid that something somehow ended up in there.

The rest of the stuff I, personally, don't see any value in other than energy efficiency and that doesn't really require networking. My fridge is constantly telling me that I need a new water and air filters but I just ignore it and assume it's a ploy to sell more filters (like printers that report you need more ink despite printing fine).

Water filters can build up bacteria (listeria is not a fun thing - there are others, too - some pretty bad) this can cause everything from a "funky smell" to "go to emergency room or die". That said, tap water in most municipalities is pretty damn clean, and you can run without a filter but if you don't want to change the filter, then do just that - remove the filter, so that you don't give the bacteria a nice growth area. If you do change the filter, don't go more than a year between changes at most. Most filters are cheap enough, usually less than $50 USD.

As far as the air filter - well, I've never heard of one on a fridge - but if you have one, it's probably to filter the air before it gets to the fan that cools the compressor. If you let it get super dirty, it won't move the air, and your compressor will be overheated/overworked, and it's life will be shortened, or it will fail - or the breaker on the fridge (know where your's is?) will trip. And don't take the filter off and just run filterless - because now the cooling coils will act as the filter, and they are anything but easy to clean (because if you don't, again failures will eventually occur - nbtw, that they sell a special fridge coil cleaning brush that looks like a very narrow bottle brush).

If you're talking about other filters in your house (HVAC) - then you want to change those too, fairly regularly. If you don't, again, you'll be overworking your A˼ unit, plus the air won't be moved around effectively (making the unit run longer to cool/heat - increasing your bill). Plus, those filters get pretty nasty too - and that stuff doesn't stay on the filter.

They make reusable filters - you cut them with scissors to match the filter opening, then when you are ready to clean them, you take them outside and run a water from a sprayer hose "backwards" thru the filter, then let ɾm air dry. That can be a cheaper and easier alternative to holding on to a box or two of filters (though such filters are pretty cheap).

Finally - note that on many cars (not all!) there is a "cabin air filter". Check your manual on how to replace it most people don't know about that filter, but it isn't difficult to change out. Costs of course are variable, depending on the car. Again, though, if you don't replace it regularly, your cabin heating˼ooling will suffer, air flow will be reduced, the fan motor will have to work harder, etc.

Basically - for air filter, check them now and then. When they look like they are getting overly fuzzy, or you can't see thru ɾm - change them out.

I don't doubt that filters should be changed regularly but I don't trust LG to tell me when.


Carl's Jr. Is Pitching Satirical 'Million Dollar Ideas' to Amazon Over Twitter - Recipes

- Preheat the oven as I'm driving home

- Alert me when my laundry˽ishes are done

- Alert me if my air filter needs replaced.

- Manage my AC/Heating for maximum energy efficiency.

- Real time energy usage monitoring.

- Turn on/off lights when I arrive/leave.

Oven preheating: takes 15 minutes when I get home barely enough time to prepare whatever I'm putting in there.

Loud dry˽ishes alerts: I don't see how it's useful. If I'm not home it doesn't matter to me if the laundry or dishes are done or not as I can't do anything about it.

Any filter changes: almost all either work on specific timing intervals, so just set 5 years worth of reminders in your phone, or they detect pressure differentials and a service light can just turn on when the machine needs a new filter.

Manage AC for max efficiency: nothing a programmable thermostat can't handle unless you have really crazy schedules but even then the savings are minuscule.

Turning on/off lights: okey, could be useful.

For me, turning on lights etc are such a small part of my day, not to mention my 'needs' as to be completely insignificant.

If the machines would do something like sort, wash and fold the laundry that would be something, but as it is I people just buy them for novelty value.

And I am surprised how often I actually use little things like adjusting the lighting, finding my phone or keys, or even raising and lowering blinds.

Just yelling, "Alexa, turn off all the lights" as I walk out the door, or "Alexa, set the house temperature to 72" as I lay down for bed has really cut out a lot of fastidious things that by themselves doesn't matter much, but added up use a surprising amount of time.

Saying, "why would I want something to do x or y?" Sounds just like people I remember back in the 90s that said, why would I want email when I can just call? And then, why would I use text messaging when I can just email.

I wouldn't want to have my oven on when I am not home- it might just be me but it seems dangerous to leave a hot oven unattended. I always check the oven before starting it to make sure it's empty. I guess I am somewhat paranoid that something somehow ended up in there.

The rest of the stuff I, personally, don't see any value in other than energy efficiency and that doesn't really require networking. My fridge is constantly telling me that I need a new water and air filters but I just ignore it and assume it's a ploy to sell more filters (like printers that report you need more ink despite printing fine).

Water filters can build up bacteria (listeria is not a fun thing - there are others, too - some pretty bad) this can cause everything from a "funky smell" to "go to emergency room or die". That said, tap water in most municipalities is pretty damn clean, and you can run without a filter but if you don't want to change the filter, then do just that - remove the filter, so that you don't give the bacteria a nice growth area. If you do change the filter, don't go more than a year between changes at most. Most filters are cheap enough, usually less than $50 USD.

As far as the air filter - well, I've never heard of one on a fridge - but if you have one, it's probably to filter the air before it gets to the fan that cools the compressor. If you let it get super dirty, it won't move the air, and your compressor will be overheated/overworked, and it's life will be shortened, or it will fail - or the breaker on the fridge (know where your's is?) will trip. And don't take the filter off and just run filterless - because now the cooling coils will act as the filter, and they are anything but easy to clean (because if you don't, again failures will eventually occur - nbtw, that they sell a special fridge coil cleaning brush that looks like a very narrow bottle brush).

If you're talking about other filters in your house (HVAC) - then you want to change those too, fairly regularly. If you don't, again, you'll be overworking your A˼ unit, plus the air won't be moved around effectively (making the unit run longer to cool/heat - increasing your bill). Plus, those filters get pretty nasty too - and that stuff doesn't stay on the filter.

They make reusable filters - you cut them with scissors to match the filter opening, then when you are ready to clean them, you take them outside and run a water from a sprayer hose "backwards" thru the filter, then let ɾm air dry. That can be a cheaper and easier alternative to holding on to a box or two of filters (though such filters are pretty cheap).

Finally - note that on many cars (not all!) there is a "cabin air filter". Check your manual on how to replace it most people don't know about that filter, but it isn't difficult to change out. Costs of course are variable, depending on the car. Again, though, if you don't replace it regularly, your cabin heating˼ooling will suffer, air flow will be reduced, the fan motor will have to work harder, etc.

Basically - for air filter, check them now and then. When they look like they are getting overly fuzzy, or you can't see thru ɾm - change them out.

I don't doubt that filters should be changed regularly but I don't trust LG to tell me when.


Carl's Jr. Is Pitching Satirical 'Million Dollar Ideas' to Amazon Over Twitter - Recipes

- Preheat the oven as I'm driving home

- Alert me when my laundry˽ishes are done

- Alert me if my air filter needs replaced.

- Manage my AC/Heating for maximum energy efficiency.

- Real time energy usage monitoring.

- Turn on/off lights when I arrive/leave.

Oven preheating: takes 15 minutes when I get home barely enough time to prepare whatever I'm putting in there.

Loud dry˽ishes alerts: I don't see how it's useful. If I'm not home it doesn't matter to me if the laundry or dishes are done or not as I can't do anything about it.

Any filter changes: almost all either work on specific timing intervals, so just set 5 years worth of reminders in your phone, or they detect pressure differentials and a service light can just turn on when the machine needs a new filter.

Manage AC for max efficiency: nothing a programmable thermostat can't handle unless you have really crazy schedules but even then the savings are minuscule.

Turning on/off lights: okey, could be useful.

For me, turning on lights etc are such a small part of my day, not to mention my 'needs' as to be completely insignificant.

If the machines would do something like sort, wash and fold the laundry that would be something, but as it is I people just buy them for novelty value.

And I am surprised how often I actually use little things like adjusting the lighting, finding my phone or keys, or even raising and lowering blinds.

Just yelling, "Alexa, turn off all the lights" as I walk out the door, or "Alexa, set the house temperature to 72" as I lay down for bed has really cut out a lot of fastidious things that by themselves doesn't matter much, but added up use a surprising amount of time.

Saying, "why would I want something to do x or y?" Sounds just like people I remember back in the 90s that said, why would I want email when I can just call? And then, why would I use text messaging when I can just email.

I wouldn't want to have my oven on when I am not home- it might just be me but it seems dangerous to leave a hot oven unattended. I always check the oven before starting it to make sure it's empty. I guess I am somewhat paranoid that something somehow ended up in there.

The rest of the stuff I, personally, don't see any value in other than energy efficiency and that doesn't really require networking. My fridge is constantly telling me that I need a new water and air filters but I just ignore it and assume it's a ploy to sell more filters (like printers that report you need more ink despite printing fine).

Water filters can build up bacteria (listeria is not a fun thing - there are others, too - some pretty bad) this can cause everything from a "funky smell" to "go to emergency room or die". That said, tap water in most municipalities is pretty damn clean, and you can run without a filter but if you don't want to change the filter, then do just that - remove the filter, so that you don't give the bacteria a nice growth area. If you do change the filter, don't go more than a year between changes at most. Most filters are cheap enough, usually less than $50 USD.

As far as the air filter - well, I've never heard of one on a fridge - but if you have one, it's probably to filter the air before it gets to the fan that cools the compressor. If you let it get super dirty, it won't move the air, and your compressor will be overheated/overworked, and it's life will be shortened, or it will fail - or the breaker on the fridge (know where your's is?) will trip. And don't take the filter off and just run filterless - because now the cooling coils will act as the filter, and they are anything but easy to clean (because if you don't, again failures will eventually occur - nbtw, that they sell a special fridge coil cleaning brush that looks like a very narrow bottle brush).

If you're talking about other filters in your house (HVAC) - then you want to change those too, fairly regularly. If you don't, again, you'll be overworking your A˼ unit, plus the air won't be moved around effectively (making the unit run longer to cool/heat - increasing your bill). Plus, those filters get pretty nasty too - and that stuff doesn't stay on the filter.

They make reusable filters - you cut them with scissors to match the filter opening, then when you are ready to clean them, you take them outside and run a water from a sprayer hose "backwards" thru the filter, then let ɾm air dry. That can be a cheaper and easier alternative to holding on to a box or two of filters (though such filters are pretty cheap).

Finally - note that on many cars (not all!) there is a "cabin air filter". Check your manual on how to replace it most people don't know about that filter, but it isn't difficult to change out. Costs of course are variable, depending on the car. Again, though, if you don't replace it regularly, your cabin heating˼ooling will suffer, air flow will be reduced, the fan motor will have to work harder, etc.

Basically - for air filter, check them now and then. When they look like they are getting overly fuzzy, or you can't see thru ɾm - change them out.

I don't doubt that filters should be changed regularly but I don't trust LG to tell me when.


Carl's Jr. Is Pitching Satirical 'Million Dollar Ideas' to Amazon Over Twitter - Recipes

- Preheat the oven as I'm driving home

- Alert me when my laundry˽ishes are done

- Alert me if my air filter needs replaced.

- Manage my AC/Heating for maximum energy efficiency.

- Real time energy usage monitoring.

- Turn on/off lights when I arrive/leave.

Oven preheating: takes 15 minutes when I get home barely enough time to prepare whatever I'm putting in there.

Loud dry˽ishes alerts: I don't see how it's useful. If I'm not home it doesn't matter to me if the laundry or dishes are done or not as I can't do anything about it.

Any filter changes: almost all either work on specific timing intervals, so just set 5 years worth of reminders in your phone, or they detect pressure differentials and a service light can just turn on when the machine needs a new filter.

Manage AC for max efficiency: nothing a programmable thermostat can't handle unless you have really crazy schedules but even then the savings are minuscule.

Turning on/off lights: okey, could be useful.

For me, turning on lights etc are such a small part of my day, not to mention my 'needs' as to be completely insignificant.

If the machines would do something like sort, wash and fold the laundry that would be something, but as it is I people just buy them for novelty value.

And I am surprised how often I actually use little things like adjusting the lighting, finding my phone or keys, or even raising and lowering blinds.

Just yelling, "Alexa, turn off all the lights" as I walk out the door, or "Alexa, set the house temperature to 72" as I lay down for bed has really cut out a lot of fastidious things that by themselves doesn't matter much, but added up use a surprising amount of time.

Saying, "why would I want something to do x or y?" Sounds just like people I remember back in the 90s that said, why would I want email when I can just call? And then, why would I use text messaging when I can just email.

I wouldn't want to have my oven on when I am not home- it might just be me but it seems dangerous to leave a hot oven unattended. I always check the oven before starting it to make sure it's empty. I guess I am somewhat paranoid that something somehow ended up in there.

The rest of the stuff I, personally, don't see any value in other than energy efficiency and that doesn't really require networking. My fridge is constantly telling me that I need a new water and air filters but I just ignore it and assume it's a ploy to sell more filters (like printers that report you need more ink despite printing fine).

Water filters can build up bacteria (listeria is not a fun thing - there are others, too - some pretty bad) this can cause everything from a "funky smell" to "go to emergency room or die". That said, tap water in most municipalities is pretty damn clean, and you can run without a filter but if you don't want to change the filter, then do just that - remove the filter, so that you don't give the bacteria a nice growth area. If you do change the filter, don't go more than a year between changes at most. Most filters are cheap enough, usually less than $50 USD.

As far as the air filter - well, I've never heard of one on a fridge - but if you have one, it's probably to filter the air before it gets to the fan that cools the compressor. If you let it get super dirty, it won't move the air, and your compressor will be overheated/overworked, and it's life will be shortened, or it will fail - or the breaker on the fridge (know where your's is?) will trip. And don't take the filter off and just run filterless - because now the cooling coils will act as the filter, and they are anything but easy to clean (because if you don't, again failures will eventually occur - nbtw, that they sell a special fridge coil cleaning brush that looks like a very narrow bottle brush).

If you're talking about other filters in your house (HVAC) - then you want to change those too, fairly regularly. If you don't, again, you'll be overworking your A˼ unit, plus the air won't be moved around effectively (making the unit run longer to cool/heat - increasing your bill). Plus, those filters get pretty nasty too - and that stuff doesn't stay on the filter.

They make reusable filters - you cut them with scissors to match the filter opening, then when you are ready to clean them, you take them outside and run a water from a sprayer hose "backwards" thru the filter, then let ɾm air dry. That can be a cheaper and easier alternative to holding on to a box or two of filters (though such filters are pretty cheap).

Finally - note that on many cars (not all!) there is a "cabin air filter". Check your manual on how to replace it most people don't know about that filter, but it isn't difficult to change out. Costs of course are variable, depending on the car. Again, though, if you don't replace it regularly, your cabin heating˼ooling will suffer, air flow will be reduced, the fan motor will have to work harder, etc.

Basically - for air filter, check them now and then. When they look like they are getting overly fuzzy, or you can't see thru ɾm - change them out.

I don't doubt that filters should be changed regularly but I don't trust LG to tell me when.


Carl's Jr. Is Pitching Satirical 'Million Dollar Ideas' to Amazon Over Twitter - Recipes

- Preheat the oven as I'm driving home

- Alert me when my laundry˽ishes are done

- Alert me if my air filter needs replaced.

- Manage my AC/Heating for maximum energy efficiency.

- Real time energy usage monitoring.

- Turn on/off lights when I arrive/leave.

Oven preheating: takes 15 minutes when I get home barely enough time to prepare whatever I'm putting in there.

Loud dry˽ishes alerts: I don't see how it's useful. If I'm not home it doesn't matter to me if the laundry or dishes are done or not as I can't do anything about it.

Any filter changes: almost all either work on specific timing intervals, so just set 5 years worth of reminders in your phone, or they detect pressure differentials and a service light can just turn on when the machine needs a new filter.

Manage AC for max efficiency: nothing a programmable thermostat can't handle unless you have really crazy schedules but even then the savings are minuscule.

Turning on/off lights: okey, could be useful.

For me, turning on lights etc are such a small part of my day, not to mention my 'needs' as to be completely insignificant.

If the machines would do something like sort, wash and fold the laundry that would be something, but as it is I people just buy them for novelty value.

And I am surprised how often I actually use little things like adjusting the lighting, finding my phone or keys, or even raising and lowering blinds.

Just yelling, "Alexa, turn off all the lights" as I walk out the door, or "Alexa, set the house temperature to 72" as I lay down for bed has really cut out a lot of fastidious things that by themselves doesn't matter much, but added up use a surprising amount of time.

Saying, "why would I want something to do x or y?" Sounds just like people I remember back in the 90s that said, why would I want email when I can just call? And then, why would I use text messaging when I can just email.

I wouldn't want to have my oven on when I am not home- it might just be me but it seems dangerous to leave a hot oven unattended. I always check the oven before starting it to make sure it's empty. I guess I am somewhat paranoid that something somehow ended up in there.

The rest of the stuff I, personally, don't see any value in other than energy efficiency and that doesn't really require networking. My fridge is constantly telling me that I need a new water and air filters but I just ignore it and assume it's a ploy to sell more filters (like printers that report you need more ink despite printing fine).

Water filters can build up bacteria (listeria is not a fun thing - there are others, too - some pretty bad) this can cause everything from a "funky smell" to "go to emergency room or die". That said, tap water in most municipalities is pretty damn clean, and you can run without a filter but if you don't want to change the filter, then do just that - remove the filter, so that you don't give the bacteria a nice growth area. If you do change the filter, don't go more than a year between changes at most. Most filters are cheap enough, usually less than $50 USD.

As far as the air filter - well, I've never heard of one on a fridge - but if you have one, it's probably to filter the air before it gets to the fan that cools the compressor. If you let it get super dirty, it won't move the air, and your compressor will be overheated/overworked, and it's life will be shortened, or it will fail - or the breaker on the fridge (know where your's is?) will trip. And don't take the filter off and just run filterless - because now the cooling coils will act as the filter, and they are anything but easy to clean (because if you don't, again failures will eventually occur - nbtw, that they sell a special fridge coil cleaning brush that looks like a very narrow bottle brush).

If you're talking about other filters in your house (HVAC) - then you want to change those too, fairly regularly. If you don't, again, you'll be overworking your A˼ unit, plus the air won't be moved around effectively (making the unit run longer to cool/heat - increasing your bill). Plus, those filters get pretty nasty too - and that stuff doesn't stay on the filter.

They make reusable filters - you cut them with scissors to match the filter opening, then when you are ready to clean them, you take them outside and run a water from a sprayer hose "backwards" thru the filter, then let ɾm air dry. That can be a cheaper and easier alternative to holding on to a box or two of filters (though such filters are pretty cheap).

Finally - note that on many cars (not all!) there is a "cabin air filter". Check your manual on how to replace it most people don't know about that filter, but it isn't difficult to change out. Costs of course are variable, depending on the car. Again, though, if you don't replace it regularly, your cabin heating˼ooling will suffer, air flow will be reduced, the fan motor will have to work harder, etc.

Basically - for air filter, check them now and then. When they look like they are getting overly fuzzy, or you can't see thru ɾm - change them out.

I don't doubt that filters should be changed regularly but I don't trust LG to tell me when.


Carl's Jr. Is Pitching Satirical 'Million Dollar Ideas' to Amazon Over Twitter - Recipes

- Preheat the oven as I'm driving home

- Alert me when my laundry˽ishes are done

- Alert me if my air filter needs replaced.

- Manage my AC/Heating for maximum energy efficiency.

- Real time energy usage monitoring.

- Turn on/off lights when I arrive/leave.

Oven preheating: takes 15 minutes when I get home barely enough time to prepare whatever I'm putting in there.

Loud dry˽ishes alerts: I don't see how it's useful. If I'm not home it doesn't matter to me if the laundry or dishes are done or not as I can't do anything about it.

Any filter changes: almost all either work on specific timing intervals, so just set 5 years worth of reminders in your phone, or they detect pressure differentials and a service light can just turn on when the machine needs a new filter.

Manage AC for max efficiency: nothing a programmable thermostat can't handle unless you have really crazy schedules but even then the savings are minuscule.

Turning on/off lights: okey, could be useful.

For me, turning on lights etc are such a small part of my day, not to mention my 'needs' as to be completely insignificant.

If the machines would do something like sort, wash and fold the laundry that would be something, but as it is I people just buy them for novelty value.

And I am surprised how often I actually use little things like adjusting the lighting, finding my phone or keys, or even raising and lowering blinds.

Just yelling, "Alexa, turn off all the lights" as I walk out the door, or "Alexa, set the house temperature to 72" as I lay down for bed has really cut out a lot of fastidious things that by themselves doesn't matter much, but added up use a surprising amount of time.

Saying, "why would I want something to do x or y?" Sounds just like people I remember back in the 90s that said, why would I want email when I can just call? And then, why would I use text messaging when I can just email.

I wouldn't want to have my oven on when I am not home- it might just be me but it seems dangerous to leave a hot oven unattended. I always check the oven before starting it to make sure it's empty. I guess I am somewhat paranoid that something somehow ended up in there.

The rest of the stuff I, personally, don't see any value in other than energy efficiency and that doesn't really require networking. My fridge is constantly telling me that I need a new water and air filters but I just ignore it and assume it's a ploy to sell more filters (like printers that report you need more ink despite printing fine).

Water filters can build up bacteria (listeria is not a fun thing - there are others, too - some pretty bad) this can cause everything from a "funky smell" to "go to emergency room or die". That said, tap water in most municipalities is pretty damn clean, and you can run without a filter but if you don't want to change the filter, then do just that - remove the filter, so that you don't give the bacteria a nice growth area. If you do change the filter, don't go more than a year between changes at most. Most filters are cheap enough, usually less than $50 USD.

As far as the air filter - well, I've never heard of one on a fridge - but if you have one, it's probably to filter the air before it gets to the fan that cools the compressor. If you let it get super dirty, it won't move the air, and your compressor will be overheated/overworked, and it's life will be shortened, or it will fail - or the breaker on the fridge (know where your's is?) will trip. And don't take the filter off and just run filterless - because now the cooling coils will act as the filter, and they are anything but easy to clean (because if you don't, again failures will eventually occur - nbtw, that they sell a special fridge coil cleaning brush that looks like a very narrow bottle brush).

If you're talking about other filters in your house (HVAC) - then you want to change those too, fairly regularly. If you don't, again, you'll be overworking your A˼ unit, plus the air won't be moved around effectively (making the unit run longer to cool/heat - increasing your bill). Plus, those filters get pretty nasty too - and that stuff doesn't stay on the filter.

They make reusable filters - you cut them with scissors to match the filter opening, then when you are ready to clean them, you take them outside and run a water from a sprayer hose "backwards" thru the filter, then let ɾm air dry. That can be a cheaper and easier alternative to holding on to a box or two of filters (though such filters are pretty cheap).

Finally - note that on many cars (not all!) there is a "cabin air filter". Check your manual on how to replace it most people don't know about that filter, but it isn't difficult to change out. Costs of course are variable, depending on the car. Again, though, if you don't replace it regularly, your cabin heating˼ooling will suffer, air flow will be reduced, the fan motor will have to work harder, etc.

Basically - for air filter, check them now and then. When they look like they are getting overly fuzzy, or you can't see thru ɾm - change them out.

I don't doubt that filters should be changed regularly but I don't trust LG to tell me when.


Carl's Jr. Is Pitching Satirical 'Million Dollar Ideas' to Amazon Over Twitter - Recipes

- Preheat the oven as I'm driving home

- Alert me when my laundry˽ishes are done

- Alert me if my air filter needs replaced.

- Manage my AC/Heating for maximum energy efficiency.

- Real time energy usage monitoring.

- Turn on/off lights when I arrive/leave.

Oven preheating: takes 15 minutes when I get home barely enough time to prepare whatever I'm putting in there.

Loud dry˽ishes alerts: I don't see how it's useful. If I'm not home it doesn't matter to me if the laundry or dishes are done or not as I can't do anything about it.

Any filter changes: almost all either work on specific timing intervals, so just set 5 years worth of reminders in your phone, or they detect pressure differentials and a service light can just turn on when the machine needs a new filter.

Manage AC for max efficiency: nothing a programmable thermostat can't handle unless you have really crazy schedules but even then the savings are minuscule.

Turning on/off lights: okey, could be useful.

For me, turning on lights etc are such a small part of my day, not to mention my 'needs' as to be completely insignificant.

If the machines would do something like sort, wash and fold the laundry that would be something, but as it is I people just buy them for novelty value.

And I am surprised how often I actually use little things like adjusting the lighting, finding my phone or keys, or even raising and lowering blinds.

Just yelling, "Alexa, turn off all the lights" as I walk out the door, or "Alexa, set the house temperature to 72" as I lay down for bed has really cut out a lot of fastidious things that by themselves doesn't matter much, but added up use a surprising amount of time.

Saying, "why would I want something to do x or y?" Sounds just like people I remember back in the 90s that said, why would I want email when I can just call? And then, why would I use text messaging when I can just email.

I wouldn't want to have my oven on when I am not home- it might just be me but it seems dangerous to leave a hot oven unattended. I always check the oven before starting it to make sure it's empty. I guess I am somewhat paranoid that something somehow ended up in there.

The rest of the stuff I, personally, don't see any value in other than energy efficiency and that doesn't really require networking. My fridge is constantly telling me that I need a new water and air filters but I just ignore it and assume it's a ploy to sell more filters (like printers that report you need more ink despite printing fine).

Water filters can build up bacteria (listeria is not a fun thing - there are others, too - some pretty bad) this can cause everything from a "funky smell" to "go to emergency room or die". That said, tap water in most municipalities is pretty damn clean, and you can run without a filter but if you don't want to change the filter, then do just that - remove the filter, so that you don't give the bacteria a nice growth area. If you do change the filter, don't go more than a year between changes at most. Most filters are cheap enough, usually less than $50 USD.

As far as the air filter - well, I've never heard of one on a fridge - but if you have one, it's probably to filter the air before it gets to the fan that cools the compressor. If you let it get super dirty, it won't move the air, and your compressor will be overheated/overworked, and it's life will be shortened, or it will fail - or the breaker on the fridge (know where your's is?) will trip. And don't take the filter off and just run filterless - because now the cooling coils will act as the filter, and they are anything but easy to clean (because if you don't, again failures will eventually occur - nbtw, that they sell a special fridge coil cleaning brush that looks like a very narrow bottle brush).

If you're talking about other filters in your house (HVAC) - then you want to change those too, fairly regularly. If you don't, again, you'll be overworking your A˼ unit, plus the air won't be moved around effectively (making the unit run longer to cool/heat - increasing your bill). Plus, those filters get pretty nasty too - and that stuff doesn't stay on the filter.

They make reusable filters - you cut them with scissors to match the filter opening, then when you are ready to clean them, you take them outside and run a water from a sprayer hose "backwards" thru the filter, then let ɾm air dry. That can be a cheaper and easier alternative to holding on to a box or two of filters (though such filters are pretty cheap).

Finally - note that on many cars (not all!) there is a "cabin air filter". Check your manual on how to replace it most people don't know about that filter, but it isn't difficult to change out. Costs of course are variable, depending on the car. Again, though, if you don't replace it regularly, your cabin heating˼ooling will suffer, air flow will be reduced, the fan motor will have to work harder, etc.

Basically - for air filter, check them now and then. When they look like they are getting overly fuzzy, or you can't see thru ɾm - change them out.

I don't doubt that filters should be changed regularly but I don't trust LG to tell me when.


Watch the video: Carls Jr The Most American Thickburger (November 2021).