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Outrageous Restaurant Marketing Stunts Throughout History Slideshow


A look at extravagant hype campaigns built to bring buzz to restaurants through the years

Nathan's Famous Hot Dogs

Everyone knows Nathan's is a New York original, but what you might not know is the company’s success is greatly due to a publicity stunt dating to 1916. Nathan, a Polish immigrant, was trying to undercut the prices of Feltman’s Restaurant, a large beer garden he shared a spot with on Coney Island. He cut prices to a nickel per dog, but results were unexpected, with rumors starting that questioned the quality of the meat to explain the low price.

To combat these rumors, Nathan hired actors to stand outside his place wearing lab coats and stethoscopes while eating the hot dogs. He later unveiled signs reading, “If doctors eat our hot dogs, you know they’re good!” It must’ve worked, because Nathans continues to thrive today, and you're probably saying, "Feltman who?"

Harry Reichenbach’s “Invisible Fish”

Though it remains sort of an urban legend as to who actually gets credited with its invention, Harry Reichenbach's “Invisible Fish” is one of the most original restaurant stunts on record. As the story goes, Reichenbach was hired by an ex-circus woman to bring traffic to her luncheon.

Harry supposedly noticed a giant empty fish tank sitting in her back room, and decided to fill it with water and put it in the restaurant window with a sign reading: “The only living Brazilian invisible fish.” The stunt garnered so much attention from people claiming to be able to see the fish that crowds couldn’t be controlled. It's been riffed on many times since.

Burger King's Left-Handed Whopper

Wikimedia Commons/Jarvin

In 1998, Burger King bought a full-page ad in USA Today announcing they had created a burger that would improve the lives 1.4 million Americans. What could that possibly be? The Left-Handed Whopper! The new burger would have all the same condiments, just rotated a mere 180 degrees to better suit hungry left-handers who may have been struggling with conventional burgers.

Whopper Freakout: A Burger King campaign in 2007 discontinued the Whopper for one day — with camera crews filming customer reaction to prove just how loved the Whopper really is. What ensued after the stunt was exactly the name of the campaign: a freakout. Watch what happened below.

Taco Bell Buys the Liberty Bell

After creating a stir in 2001 for a stunt promising a free taco to every U.S. citizen if the Mir space station core hit a target they assembled, Taco Bell was at it again in 2006. They put an ad in The New York Times headlined, “Taco Bell Buys the Liberty Bell.” The ruse continued with the company explaining that the purchase was mean to help allay the national debt.

Though it sounds like an obvious joke, enraged Philadelphians complained in numbers about the transaction. Taco Bell admitted the whole story was a scam, but their sales did increase by about half-a-million dollars during the week of April 1st, compared to the week before.

Nando’s Hijacks the Bruno Premiere

In a creative and elaborate hoax in Sydney circa 2009, a Portuguese chain called Nando’s arranged for an impersonator to crash the premier of Sacha Baron Cohen’s latest flick, Bruno, while dressed up to look like the film's central character.

When the impersonator arrived, six models followed him out of the limo. While the fake Bruno was escorted off the red carpet some models dunked buckets of Nando’s Peri Peri sauce over their chests and others unveiled signs proclaiming: “This year’s hottest chicks are covered in Peri Peri.” See what went down in the video below.

Ivar’s Underwater Billboards

In a stunt that created much controversy on the Puget Sound in 2009, the longstanding Seattle seafood restaurant, Ivar’s, surfaced a series of underwater billboards that were supposedly submerged in 1954. “Ivar’s Chowder. Worth surfacing for. 75¢ a cup," a sign proclaimed. And “Diver’s special. Kids 12 & Under Eat Free with regular entrée. Includes Jell-O.”

Allegedly, the signs were part of the restaurant's original owner’s plan to advertise to divers and submarine pilots passing through the Puget Sound. Even though it was revealed to be a hoax, the stunt worked miracles for Ivar's. The following months saw overall sales increase by ten percent, with clam chowder sales increasing by more than 400%.

Melbourne’s Hidden Pizza

Not too long ago, folks in Melbourne were abuzz with excitement about a “hidden pizza” restaurant that was offering free pizza to any customer who came in. The catch? You had to find it first.

People were instructed, “Look it up the way you would any other business.” You’re thinking Google? Wrong. Turns out the whole thing was a scam put on by Yellow Pages and an advertising company called Sensis, as a way to say something like, "Yes, we’re still relevant." What a tease!

Berlin’s FLIMÉ Encourages Cannibalism

One stunt in 2010 caused such an uproar that it brought international attention to Berlin’s FLIMÉ restaurant before it even opened. The restaurant released an ad campaign calling for donors to give “any part of their body” to be served at the eatery. That’s right, a cannibal restaurant. And this was just four years after Berlin's Armin Meiwes (pictured) had been sentenced to life in prison for cannibalism.

When the stunt was found to be a hoax, the restaurant changed their website to how it remains today, a declaration by Vebu (Germany’s PETA equivalent) to condemn meat eating as similar to eating human flesh.

Icelandic Chefs Cook with Lava

Pink Taco’s Painted Donkey

This Los Angeles taqueria made headlines last month when they decided to celebrate Cinco de Mayo by painting a donkey bright pink and parking it right outside their restaurant. As expected, animal rights activists were up in arms over the spectacle, and there was actually a boycott launched for the restaurant on Facebook. They have since posted a response on the restaurant’s homepage, assuring everyone that the animal was treated safely, and they have spoken with PETA, vowing to never again use live animals in any of their events or promotions.


16 Cancelled Food Network Shows You Forgot You Loved

Food Network has brought all kinds of chefs into our living rooms over the past few decades, and with it, some unforgettable shows. Whether they inspired you to get cooking&mdashor just made you really, really hungry&mdashhere are the ones we wish would make a comeback.

Emeril Lagasse came to Food Network in 1995 with his cooking show Essence of Emeril. The chef offered recipes in experimental Creole, AKA the "New New Orleans" style he had become known for in the early '90s. Around this time, he'd made a name for himself at the legendary New Orleans restaurant Commander's Palace, his own restaurant Emeril's, and through his cookbook, Emeril's New New Orleans Cooking.

He made even more of a splash, however, in 1997 with his energetic live show&mdashwhich also featured a studio audience and house band, as well as musical and celebrity guests&mdashEmeril Live.

This is the show that spawned the inimitable catchphrases Lagasse would use when seasoning his food: "Bam," "oh yeah, baby!" and "kick it up a notch!"

If you need more Emeril in your life, he's now partnered with a cruise ship, taking food-filled journeys through the seas.

In an age of speedy time-lapse cooking videos, it's almost difficult to imagine the premise of Cooking Live with Sara Moulton&mdashin which the former executive chef of Gourmet Magazine did, in fact, cook live on the air, taking calls from viewers as she went&mdashbut the show was incredibly successful when it ran from 1996 to 2002.

In fact, it was so successful it then ran again briefly in 2003 and 2004, producing more than 1,200 episodes total. People loved her simplification of usually difficult recipes, and she became one of Food Network's first mega-stars.

Moulton went on to hosts "Sara's Weeknight Meals" on public television and is the author the "Kitchen Wise" Associated Press column. She released her most recent cookbook, Sara Moulton's Home Cooking 101: How to Make Everything Taste Better, a few years back.

Host Ming Tsai actually began his television cooking career while filling in for Sara Moulton during a week she was absent. His own show, East Meets West, premiered not too long after in 1998&mdashthe same year, incidentally, that his Wellesley, MA, restaurant Blue Ginger earned a nomination for Best New Restaurant from the James Beard Foundation.

On the show, Tsai shared recipes in his signature style, combining both Asian and European influences. His success continued from the restaurant to the show, which earned a Daytime Emmy win.

East Meets West went off the air in 2003, but Tsai went on to host Simply Ming on American Public Television since then, and you can check out some of the most recent episodes here.

Boyish, charming, British Jamie Oliver entered the kitchens and hearts of Americans when his BBC-produced show The Naked Chef first aired in America on the Food Network in 1999. The "naked" in the title, to the chagrin of some, referred not to Oliver but to the way he prepared food: simple, yet rich, meals involving minimal effort.

Oliver quickly became a food world sex symbol. Though The Naked Chef ended in 2001, it spawned several other series throughout the years, including Food Network's own Jamie at Home later on.

In the last few years, Oliver has dedicated a great deal of effort on ending childhood obesity&mdashand was made an Honorary Fellow by England's Royal College of General Practitioners for doing so&mdashmost recently by focusing on the problem in a 2015 documentary called Jamie's Sugar Rush.

The legendary chef had been on television before, of course, but it was beginning on the Food Network in 2000 that he had his very own self-titled show. For five seasons, Puck gave insights into his daily life and traveled around the country exploring different regional cuisines, while also cooking and sharing secrets behind the dishes that made him famous.

Once, he even fulfilled a lifelong dream by welcoming the legendary Julia Child onto his show to help him cook Guinea Fowl. Wolfgang Puck added a little bit of luxury to viewer's lives, not to mention killer cooking techniques.

Puck won an Emmy for the series in 2002, and eventually hosted or appeared on several more cooking shows. Puck's restaurants continue to thrive the world over. and no, you probably still can't get a table at Spago.

Reality show Ace of Cakes followed baker Duff Goldman's Baltimore cakery Charm City Cakes as he and his team went above and beyond to create utterly amazing cakes for a variety of events each week, sometimes in a matter of days. The storylines focused not just on cake creation and construction, but small business ownership, interpersonal interactions with the team and clients.

Combining Goldman's backgrounds in metal-smithing and classic pastry-making, these cakes had (and continue to have) everything: sound, movement, smoke. Legend has it the bakery even dreamed up a life-size baby elephant cake once upon a time.

While Ace of Cakes itself ended in 2011 after 10 seasons, Charm City Cakes is alive and kicking in Baltimore and its newest location in Los Angeles. Goldman still appears on a variety of Food Network baking shows, like Worst Bakers in America and the Holiday Baking Championship.

Now this is a show for people who love to eat, featuring where Food Network stars and celebrity chefs love to go on their days off, from breakfast foods to hamburgers to pizza, and more. The restaurants weren't just luxury establishments in big cities, but also mom and pop shops in tiny corners of America, well-loved independent bakeries, and really any place that just had good food.

It humanized favorite Food Network faces, but also gave the viewer the opportunity to go test out some flavors for themselves. The show ran for two years, from 2009-2011, but regularly reruns on the Cooking Channel if you still want to check it out.

While British journalist and food personality Nigella Lawson first made a splash in the U.S. with her show Nigella Bites on E! and Style, her Food Network debut came along with Nigella Feasts in 2006.

Known for sharing recipes that seem complex but are elegant and simple to prepare, Lawson was known as a host who was approachable.

Though Nigella Feasts was only ever meant for one season, it was favorably reviewed everywhere from Time to the New York Daily News. Lawson now regularly makes appearances on shows around the world, publishing cookbooks and even a podcast for the holiday season.

There was nothing about Unwrapped that wasn't a magical combination. The genial and forever lovely Marc Summers? Behind-the-scenes in places that make all of your favorite foods in the world? So. Much. Candy.

The show ran for nine seasons starting in 2001 (a lifetime in those days!), and viewers who missed it after t came off the air needn't have been sad&mdashAlfonso Ribeiro brought back a reboot entitled Unwrapped 2.0 back in 2015.

Rachael Ray taught us all how to dine on a budget with this show that took her on the road looking for the best food deals in the world. It lasted for four seasons, from 2002 to 2005. Her final stop was a trip to New York City.

What's incredible about the show is that it aired during Rachael's tenure as the host of 30-Minute Meals. To this day, people use Rachael's local recommendations as a guide for how to eat their way through certain cities.

Speaking of which, this was the show that empowered many home cooks to feel like they cook balance it all&mdashwork, life, and an easy, nutritious, and quick meal plan they could work through at the end of a long day.

That said, it's hard to speak about the show in the past tense, as Rachael brought it back to life on the Food Network earlier this very year.

Who doesn't look back fondly on the show that kickstarted Giada's career? The show ran for hundreds of episodes starting in 2003, most of which featured light and easy recipes as well as appearances from Giada's loved ones.

Though Giada ended the show shortly before the birth of her firstborn, a lot of her later Food Network projects featured the same gorgeous backdrops, easy-to-follow meals, and, of course, the lovely Giada.

Jeff Mauro found his niche riffing off the crew of misfit chefs on The Kitchen, but before his talk show days, he was the Sandwich King. He made us realize that you can make a case for stuffing anything between two slices of bread, and it would sorta-kinda always work.

And while the Food Network Star's first solo show wasn't long-lived, Jeff continues to do well for himself, often appearing in celeb chef showcases and specials. Oh, and maybe even a Disney production? Only time will tell.

David Rosengarten, host of Taste, was like the original Alton Brown, in that he took a deep dive into a different food every episode. If you ever wanted a 30-minute look into the perfect BLT or oysters, this was it.

At times, Rosengarten's soothing-yet-kinda-sorta-authoritative voice seemed like it belonged to a member of Anchorman's news desk, but as part of the original Food Network line-up, viewers loved him.

The tablescapes&mdashoh, the tablescapes. That's how Sandra Lee referred to her table settings, themed to match the meal she just made. They looked like the result of a long, dark Pinterest binge&mdashbut before Pinterest was even a thing.

The food was adored by people with no time at all, too: All of the recipes always include some pre-made ingredients that you could find at any grocery store.

We all knew Bobby Flay could work a grill, but this was the show that solidified his status as "Best All-Around Chef." He challenged so-called experts across the country, trying to make a dish better than them. The best part of each episode was when Flay would surprise his competitor&mdashcue the happy tears.

It's hard to believe now this competition show was on from just 2006-2011, but again, it's not like we never got to see Bobby again. He is&mdashand will forever be&mdasha Food Network mainstay.


16 Cancelled Food Network Shows You Forgot You Loved

Food Network has brought all kinds of chefs into our living rooms over the past few decades, and with it, some unforgettable shows. Whether they inspired you to get cooking&mdashor just made you really, really hungry&mdashhere are the ones we wish would make a comeback.

Emeril Lagasse came to Food Network in 1995 with his cooking show Essence of Emeril. The chef offered recipes in experimental Creole, AKA the "New New Orleans" style he had become known for in the early '90s. Around this time, he'd made a name for himself at the legendary New Orleans restaurant Commander's Palace, his own restaurant Emeril's, and through his cookbook, Emeril's New New Orleans Cooking.

He made even more of a splash, however, in 1997 with his energetic live show&mdashwhich also featured a studio audience and house band, as well as musical and celebrity guests&mdashEmeril Live.

This is the show that spawned the inimitable catchphrases Lagasse would use when seasoning his food: "Bam," "oh yeah, baby!" and "kick it up a notch!"

If you need more Emeril in your life, he's now partnered with a cruise ship, taking food-filled journeys through the seas.

In an age of speedy time-lapse cooking videos, it's almost difficult to imagine the premise of Cooking Live with Sara Moulton&mdashin which the former executive chef of Gourmet Magazine did, in fact, cook live on the air, taking calls from viewers as she went&mdashbut the show was incredibly successful when it ran from 1996 to 2002.

In fact, it was so successful it then ran again briefly in 2003 and 2004, producing more than 1,200 episodes total. People loved her simplification of usually difficult recipes, and she became one of Food Network's first mega-stars.

Moulton went on to hosts "Sara's Weeknight Meals" on public television and is the author the "Kitchen Wise" Associated Press column. She released her most recent cookbook, Sara Moulton's Home Cooking 101: How to Make Everything Taste Better, a few years back.

Host Ming Tsai actually began his television cooking career while filling in for Sara Moulton during a week she was absent. His own show, East Meets West, premiered not too long after in 1998&mdashthe same year, incidentally, that his Wellesley, MA, restaurant Blue Ginger earned a nomination for Best New Restaurant from the James Beard Foundation.

On the show, Tsai shared recipes in his signature style, combining both Asian and European influences. His success continued from the restaurant to the show, which earned a Daytime Emmy win.

East Meets West went off the air in 2003, but Tsai went on to host Simply Ming on American Public Television since then, and you can check out some of the most recent episodes here.

Boyish, charming, British Jamie Oliver entered the kitchens and hearts of Americans when his BBC-produced show The Naked Chef first aired in America on the Food Network in 1999. The "naked" in the title, to the chagrin of some, referred not to Oliver but to the way he prepared food: simple, yet rich, meals involving minimal effort.

Oliver quickly became a food world sex symbol. Though The Naked Chef ended in 2001, it spawned several other series throughout the years, including Food Network's own Jamie at Home later on.

In the last few years, Oliver has dedicated a great deal of effort on ending childhood obesity&mdashand was made an Honorary Fellow by England's Royal College of General Practitioners for doing so&mdashmost recently by focusing on the problem in a 2015 documentary called Jamie's Sugar Rush.

The legendary chef had been on television before, of course, but it was beginning on the Food Network in 2000 that he had his very own self-titled show. For five seasons, Puck gave insights into his daily life and traveled around the country exploring different regional cuisines, while also cooking and sharing secrets behind the dishes that made him famous.

Once, he even fulfilled a lifelong dream by welcoming the legendary Julia Child onto his show to help him cook Guinea Fowl. Wolfgang Puck added a little bit of luxury to viewer's lives, not to mention killer cooking techniques.

Puck won an Emmy for the series in 2002, and eventually hosted or appeared on several more cooking shows. Puck's restaurants continue to thrive the world over. and no, you probably still can't get a table at Spago.

Reality show Ace of Cakes followed baker Duff Goldman's Baltimore cakery Charm City Cakes as he and his team went above and beyond to create utterly amazing cakes for a variety of events each week, sometimes in a matter of days. The storylines focused not just on cake creation and construction, but small business ownership, interpersonal interactions with the team and clients.

Combining Goldman's backgrounds in metal-smithing and classic pastry-making, these cakes had (and continue to have) everything: sound, movement, smoke. Legend has it the bakery even dreamed up a life-size baby elephant cake once upon a time.

While Ace of Cakes itself ended in 2011 after 10 seasons, Charm City Cakes is alive and kicking in Baltimore and its newest location in Los Angeles. Goldman still appears on a variety of Food Network baking shows, like Worst Bakers in America and the Holiday Baking Championship.

Now this is a show for people who love to eat, featuring where Food Network stars and celebrity chefs love to go on their days off, from breakfast foods to hamburgers to pizza, and more. The restaurants weren't just luxury establishments in big cities, but also mom and pop shops in tiny corners of America, well-loved independent bakeries, and really any place that just had good food.

It humanized favorite Food Network faces, but also gave the viewer the opportunity to go test out some flavors for themselves. The show ran for two years, from 2009-2011, but regularly reruns on the Cooking Channel if you still want to check it out.

While British journalist and food personality Nigella Lawson first made a splash in the U.S. with her show Nigella Bites on E! and Style, her Food Network debut came along with Nigella Feasts in 2006.

Known for sharing recipes that seem complex but are elegant and simple to prepare, Lawson was known as a host who was approachable.

Though Nigella Feasts was only ever meant for one season, it was favorably reviewed everywhere from Time to the New York Daily News. Lawson now regularly makes appearances on shows around the world, publishing cookbooks and even a podcast for the holiday season.

There was nothing about Unwrapped that wasn't a magical combination. The genial and forever lovely Marc Summers? Behind-the-scenes in places that make all of your favorite foods in the world? So. Much. Candy.

The show ran for nine seasons starting in 2001 (a lifetime in those days!), and viewers who missed it after t came off the air needn't have been sad&mdashAlfonso Ribeiro brought back a reboot entitled Unwrapped 2.0 back in 2015.

Rachael Ray taught us all how to dine on a budget with this show that took her on the road looking for the best food deals in the world. It lasted for four seasons, from 2002 to 2005. Her final stop was a trip to New York City.

What's incredible about the show is that it aired during Rachael's tenure as the host of 30-Minute Meals. To this day, people use Rachael's local recommendations as a guide for how to eat their way through certain cities.

Speaking of which, this was the show that empowered many home cooks to feel like they cook balance it all&mdashwork, life, and an easy, nutritious, and quick meal plan they could work through at the end of a long day.

That said, it's hard to speak about the show in the past tense, as Rachael brought it back to life on the Food Network earlier this very year.

Who doesn't look back fondly on the show that kickstarted Giada's career? The show ran for hundreds of episodes starting in 2003, most of which featured light and easy recipes as well as appearances from Giada's loved ones.

Though Giada ended the show shortly before the birth of her firstborn, a lot of her later Food Network projects featured the same gorgeous backdrops, easy-to-follow meals, and, of course, the lovely Giada.

Jeff Mauro found his niche riffing off the crew of misfit chefs on The Kitchen, but before his talk show days, he was the Sandwich King. He made us realize that you can make a case for stuffing anything between two slices of bread, and it would sorta-kinda always work.

And while the Food Network Star's first solo show wasn't long-lived, Jeff continues to do well for himself, often appearing in celeb chef showcases and specials. Oh, and maybe even a Disney production? Only time will tell.

David Rosengarten, host of Taste, was like the original Alton Brown, in that he took a deep dive into a different food every episode. If you ever wanted a 30-minute look into the perfect BLT or oysters, this was it.

At times, Rosengarten's soothing-yet-kinda-sorta-authoritative voice seemed like it belonged to a member of Anchorman's news desk, but as part of the original Food Network line-up, viewers loved him.

The tablescapes&mdashoh, the tablescapes. That's how Sandra Lee referred to her table settings, themed to match the meal she just made. They looked like the result of a long, dark Pinterest binge&mdashbut before Pinterest was even a thing.

The food was adored by people with no time at all, too: All of the recipes always include some pre-made ingredients that you could find at any grocery store.

We all knew Bobby Flay could work a grill, but this was the show that solidified his status as "Best All-Around Chef." He challenged so-called experts across the country, trying to make a dish better than them. The best part of each episode was when Flay would surprise his competitor&mdashcue the happy tears.

It's hard to believe now this competition show was on from just 2006-2011, but again, it's not like we never got to see Bobby again. He is&mdashand will forever be&mdasha Food Network mainstay.


16 Cancelled Food Network Shows You Forgot You Loved

Food Network has brought all kinds of chefs into our living rooms over the past few decades, and with it, some unforgettable shows. Whether they inspired you to get cooking&mdashor just made you really, really hungry&mdashhere are the ones we wish would make a comeback.

Emeril Lagasse came to Food Network in 1995 with his cooking show Essence of Emeril. The chef offered recipes in experimental Creole, AKA the "New New Orleans" style he had become known for in the early '90s. Around this time, he'd made a name for himself at the legendary New Orleans restaurant Commander's Palace, his own restaurant Emeril's, and through his cookbook, Emeril's New New Orleans Cooking.

He made even more of a splash, however, in 1997 with his energetic live show&mdashwhich also featured a studio audience and house band, as well as musical and celebrity guests&mdashEmeril Live.

This is the show that spawned the inimitable catchphrases Lagasse would use when seasoning his food: "Bam," "oh yeah, baby!" and "kick it up a notch!"

If you need more Emeril in your life, he's now partnered with a cruise ship, taking food-filled journeys through the seas.

In an age of speedy time-lapse cooking videos, it's almost difficult to imagine the premise of Cooking Live with Sara Moulton&mdashin which the former executive chef of Gourmet Magazine did, in fact, cook live on the air, taking calls from viewers as she went&mdashbut the show was incredibly successful when it ran from 1996 to 2002.

In fact, it was so successful it then ran again briefly in 2003 and 2004, producing more than 1,200 episodes total. People loved her simplification of usually difficult recipes, and she became one of Food Network's first mega-stars.

Moulton went on to hosts "Sara's Weeknight Meals" on public television and is the author the "Kitchen Wise" Associated Press column. She released her most recent cookbook, Sara Moulton's Home Cooking 101: How to Make Everything Taste Better, a few years back.

Host Ming Tsai actually began his television cooking career while filling in for Sara Moulton during a week she was absent. His own show, East Meets West, premiered not too long after in 1998&mdashthe same year, incidentally, that his Wellesley, MA, restaurant Blue Ginger earned a nomination for Best New Restaurant from the James Beard Foundation.

On the show, Tsai shared recipes in his signature style, combining both Asian and European influences. His success continued from the restaurant to the show, which earned a Daytime Emmy win.

East Meets West went off the air in 2003, but Tsai went on to host Simply Ming on American Public Television since then, and you can check out some of the most recent episodes here.

Boyish, charming, British Jamie Oliver entered the kitchens and hearts of Americans when his BBC-produced show The Naked Chef first aired in America on the Food Network in 1999. The "naked" in the title, to the chagrin of some, referred not to Oliver but to the way he prepared food: simple, yet rich, meals involving minimal effort.

Oliver quickly became a food world sex symbol. Though The Naked Chef ended in 2001, it spawned several other series throughout the years, including Food Network's own Jamie at Home later on.

In the last few years, Oliver has dedicated a great deal of effort on ending childhood obesity&mdashand was made an Honorary Fellow by England's Royal College of General Practitioners for doing so&mdashmost recently by focusing on the problem in a 2015 documentary called Jamie's Sugar Rush.

The legendary chef had been on television before, of course, but it was beginning on the Food Network in 2000 that he had his very own self-titled show. For five seasons, Puck gave insights into his daily life and traveled around the country exploring different regional cuisines, while also cooking and sharing secrets behind the dishes that made him famous.

Once, he even fulfilled a lifelong dream by welcoming the legendary Julia Child onto his show to help him cook Guinea Fowl. Wolfgang Puck added a little bit of luxury to viewer's lives, not to mention killer cooking techniques.

Puck won an Emmy for the series in 2002, and eventually hosted or appeared on several more cooking shows. Puck's restaurants continue to thrive the world over. and no, you probably still can't get a table at Spago.

Reality show Ace of Cakes followed baker Duff Goldman's Baltimore cakery Charm City Cakes as he and his team went above and beyond to create utterly amazing cakes for a variety of events each week, sometimes in a matter of days. The storylines focused not just on cake creation and construction, but small business ownership, interpersonal interactions with the team and clients.

Combining Goldman's backgrounds in metal-smithing and classic pastry-making, these cakes had (and continue to have) everything: sound, movement, smoke. Legend has it the bakery even dreamed up a life-size baby elephant cake once upon a time.

While Ace of Cakes itself ended in 2011 after 10 seasons, Charm City Cakes is alive and kicking in Baltimore and its newest location in Los Angeles. Goldman still appears on a variety of Food Network baking shows, like Worst Bakers in America and the Holiday Baking Championship.

Now this is a show for people who love to eat, featuring where Food Network stars and celebrity chefs love to go on their days off, from breakfast foods to hamburgers to pizza, and more. The restaurants weren't just luxury establishments in big cities, but also mom and pop shops in tiny corners of America, well-loved independent bakeries, and really any place that just had good food.

It humanized favorite Food Network faces, but also gave the viewer the opportunity to go test out some flavors for themselves. The show ran for two years, from 2009-2011, but regularly reruns on the Cooking Channel if you still want to check it out.

While British journalist and food personality Nigella Lawson first made a splash in the U.S. with her show Nigella Bites on E! and Style, her Food Network debut came along with Nigella Feasts in 2006.

Known for sharing recipes that seem complex but are elegant and simple to prepare, Lawson was known as a host who was approachable.

Though Nigella Feasts was only ever meant for one season, it was favorably reviewed everywhere from Time to the New York Daily News. Lawson now regularly makes appearances on shows around the world, publishing cookbooks and even a podcast for the holiday season.

There was nothing about Unwrapped that wasn't a magical combination. The genial and forever lovely Marc Summers? Behind-the-scenes in places that make all of your favorite foods in the world? So. Much. Candy.

The show ran for nine seasons starting in 2001 (a lifetime in those days!), and viewers who missed it after t came off the air needn't have been sad&mdashAlfonso Ribeiro brought back a reboot entitled Unwrapped 2.0 back in 2015.

Rachael Ray taught us all how to dine on a budget with this show that took her on the road looking for the best food deals in the world. It lasted for four seasons, from 2002 to 2005. Her final stop was a trip to New York City.

What's incredible about the show is that it aired during Rachael's tenure as the host of 30-Minute Meals. To this day, people use Rachael's local recommendations as a guide for how to eat their way through certain cities.

Speaking of which, this was the show that empowered many home cooks to feel like they cook balance it all&mdashwork, life, and an easy, nutritious, and quick meal plan they could work through at the end of a long day.

That said, it's hard to speak about the show in the past tense, as Rachael brought it back to life on the Food Network earlier this very year.

Who doesn't look back fondly on the show that kickstarted Giada's career? The show ran for hundreds of episodes starting in 2003, most of which featured light and easy recipes as well as appearances from Giada's loved ones.

Though Giada ended the show shortly before the birth of her firstborn, a lot of her later Food Network projects featured the same gorgeous backdrops, easy-to-follow meals, and, of course, the lovely Giada.

Jeff Mauro found his niche riffing off the crew of misfit chefs on The Kitchen, but before his talk show days, he was the Sandwich King. He made us realize that you can make a case for stuffing anything between two slices of bread, and it would sorta-kinda always work.

And while the Food Network Star's first solo show wasn't long-lived, Jeff continues to do well for himself, often appearing in celeb chef showcases and specials. Oh, and maybe even a Disney production? Only time will tell.

David Rosengarten, host of Taste, was like the original Alton Brown, in that he took a deep dive into a different food every episode. If you ever wanted a 30-minute look into the perfect BLT or oysters, this was it.

At times, Rosengarten's soothing-yet-kinda-sorta-authoritative voice seemed like it belonged to a member of Anchorman's news desk, but as part of the original Food Network line-up, viewers loved him.

The tablescapes&mdashoh, the tablescapes. That's how Sandra Lee referred to her table settings, themed to match the meal she just made. They looked like the result of a long, dark Pinterest binge&mdashbut before Pinterest was even a thing.

The food was adored by people with no time at all, too: All of the recipes always include some pre-made ingredients that you could find at any grocery store.

We all knew Bobby Flay could work a grill, but this was the show that solidified his status as "Best All-Around Chef." He challenged so-called experts across the country, trying to make a dish better than them. The best part of each episode was when Flay would surprise his competitor&mdashcue the happy tears.

It's hard to believe now this competition show was on from just 2006-2011, but again, it's not like we never got to see Bobby again. He is&mdashand will forever be&mdasha Food Network mainstay.


16 Cancelled Food Network Shows You Forgot You Loved

Food Network has brought all kinds of chefs into our living rooms over the past few decades, and with it, some unforgettable shows. Whether they inspired you to get cooking&mdashor just made you really, really hungry&mdashhere are the ones we wish would make a comeback.

Emeril Lagasse came to Food Network in 1995 with his cooking show Essence of Emeril. The chef offered recipes in experimental Creole, AKA the "New New Orleans" style he had become known for in the early '90s. Around this time, he'd made a name for himself at the legendary New Orleans restaurant Commander's Palace, his own restaurant Emeril's, and through his cookbook, Emeril's New New Orleans Cooking.

He made even more of a splash, however, in 1997 with his energetic live show&mdashwhich also featured a studio audience and house band, as well as musical and celebrity guests&mdashEmeril Live.

This is the show that spawned the inimitable catchphrases Lagasse would use when seasoning his food: "Bam," "oh yeah, baby!" and "kick it up a notch!"

If you need more Emeril in your life, he's now partnered with a cruise ship, taking food-filled journeys through the seas.

In an age of speedy time-lapse cooking videos, it's almost difficult to imagine the premise of Cooking Live with Sara Moulton&mdashin which the former executive chef of Gourmet Magazine did, in fact, cook live on the air, taking calls from viewers as she went&mdashbut the show was incredibly successful when it ran from 1996 to 2002.

In fact, it was so successful it then ran again briefly in 2003 and 2004, producing more than 1,200 episodes total. People loved her simplification of usually difficult recipes, and she became one of Food Network's first mega-stars.

Moulton went on to hosts "Sara's Weeknight Meals" on public television and is the author the "Kitchen Wise" Associated Press column. She released her most recent cookbook, Sara Moulton's Home Cooking 101: How to Make Everything Taste Better, a few years back.

Host Ming Tsai actually began his television cooking career while filling in for Sara Moulton during a week she was absent. His own show, East Meets West, premiered not too long after in 1998&mdashthe same year, incidentally, that his Wellesley, MA, restaurant Blue Ginger earned a nomination for Best New Restaurant from the James Beard Foundation.

On the show, Tsai shared recipes in his signature style, combining both Asian and European influences. His success continued from the restaurant to the show, which earned a Daytime Emmy win.

East Meets West went off the air in 2003, but Tsai went on to host Simply Ming on American Public Television since then, and you can check out some of the most recent episodes here.

Boyish, charming, British Jamie Oliver entered the kitchens and hearts of Americans when his BBC-produced show The Naked Chef first aired in America on the Food Network in 1999. The "naked" in the title, to the chagrin of some, referred not to Oliver but to the way he prepared food: simple, yet rich, meals involving minimal effort.

Oliver quickly became a food world sex symbol. Though The Naked Chef ended in 2001, it spawned several other series throughout the years, including Food Network's own Jamie at Home later on.

In the last few years, Oliver has dedicated a great deal of effort on ending childhood obesity&mdashand was made an Honorary Fellow by England's Royal College of General Practitioners for doing so&mdashmost recently by focusing on the problem in a 2015 documentary called Jamie's Sugar Rush.

The legendary chef had been on television before, of course, but it was beginning on the Food Network in 2000 that he had his very own self-titled show. For five seasons, Puck gave insights into his daily life and traveled around the country exploring different regional cuisines, while also cooking and sharing secrets behind the dishes that made him famous.

Once, he even fulfilled a lifelong dream by welcoming the legendary Julia Child onto his show to help him cook Guinea Fowl. Wolfgang Puck added a little bit of luxury to viewer's lives, not to mention killer cooking techniques.

Puck won an Emmy for the series in 2002, and eventually hosted or appeared on several more cooking shows. Puck's restaurants continue to thrive the world over. and no, you probably still can't get a table at Spago.

Reality show Ace of Cakes followed baker Duff Goldman's Baltimore cakery Charm City Cakes as he and his team went above and beyond to create utterly amazing cakes for a variety of events each week, sometimes in a matter of days. The storylines focused not just on cake creation and construction, but small business ownership, interpersonal interactions with the team and clients.

Combining Goldman's backgrounds in metal-smithing and classic pastry-making, these cakes had (and continue to have) everything: sound, movement, smoke. Legend has it the bakery even dreamed up a life-size baby elephant cake once upon a time.

While Ace of Cakes itself ended in 2011 after 10 seasons, Charm City Cakes is alive and kicking in Baltimore and its newest location in Los Angeles. Goldman still appears on a variety of Food Network baking shows, like Worst Bakers in America and the Holiday Baking Championship.

Now this is a show for people who love to eat, featuring where Food Network stars and celebrity chefs love to go on their days off, from breakfast foods to hamburgers to pizza, and more. The restaurants weren't just luxury establishments in big cities, but also mom and pop shops in tiny corners of America, well-loved independent bakeries, and really any place that just had good food.

It humanized favorite Food Network faces, but also gave the viewer the opportunity to go test out some flavors for themselves. The show ran for two years, from 2009-2011, but regularly reruns on the Cooking Channel if you still want to check it out.

While British journalist and food personality Nigella Lawson first made a splash in the U.S. with her show Nigella Bites on E! and Style, her Food Network debut came along with Nigella Feasts in 2006.

Known for sharing recipes that seem complex but are elegant and simple to prepare, Lawson was known as a host who was approachable.

Though Nigella Feasts was only ever meant for one season, it was favorably reviewed everywhere from Time to the New York Daily News. Lawson now regularly makes appearances on shows around the world, publishing cookbooks and even a podcast for the holiday season.

There was nothing about Unwrapped that wasn't a magical combination. The genial and forever lovely Marc Summers? Behind-the-scenes in places that make all of your favorite foods in the world? So. Much. Candy.

The show ran for nine seasons starting in 2001 (a lifetime in those days!), and viewers who missed it after t came off the air needn't have been sad&mdashAlfonso Ribeiro brought back a reboot entitled Unwrapped 2.0 back in 2015.

Rachael Ray taught us all how to dine on a budget with this show that took her on the road looking for the best food deals in the world. It lasted for four seasons, from 2002 to 2005. Her final stop was a trip to New York City.

What's incredible about the show is that it aired during Rachael's tenure as the host of 30-Minute Meals. To this day, people use Rachael's local recommendations as a guide for how to eat their way through certain cities.

Speaking of which, this was the show that empowered many home cooks to feel like they cook balance it all&mdashwork, life, and an easy, nutritious, and quick meal plan they could work through at the end of a long day.

That said, it's hard to speak about the show in the past tense, as Rachael brought it back to life on the Food Network earlier this very year.

Who doesn't look back fondly on the show that kickstarted Giada's career? The show ran for hundreds of episodes starting in 2003, most of which featured light and easy recipes as well as appearances from Giada's loved ones.

Though Giada ended the show shortly before the birth of her firstborn, a lot of her later Food Network projects featured the same gorgeous backdrops, easy-to-follow meals, and, of course, the lovely Giada.

Jeff Mauro found his niche riffing off the crew of misfit chefs on The Kitchen, but before his talk show days, he was the Sandwich King. He made us realize that you can make a case for stuffing anything between two slices of bread, and it would sorta-kinda always work.

And while the Food Network Star's first solo show wasn't long-lived, Jeff continues to do well for himself, often appearing in celeb chef showcases and specials. Oh, and maybe even a Disney production? Only time will tell.

David Rosengarten, host of Taste, was like the original Alton Brown, in that he took a deep dive into a different food every episode. If you ever wanted a 30-minute look into the perfect BLT or oysters, this was it.

At times, Rosengarten's soothing-yet-kinda-sorta-authoritative voice seemed like it belonged to a member of Anchorman's news desk, but as part of the original Food Network line-up, viewers loved him.

The tablescapes&mdashoh, the tablescapes. That's how Sandra Lee referred to her table settings, themed to match the meal she just made. They looked like the result of a long, dark Pinterest binge&mdashbut before Pinterest was even a thing.

The food was adored by people with no time at all, too: All of the recipes always include some pre-made ingredients that you could find at any grocery store.

We all knew Bobby Flay could work a grill, but this was the show that solidified his status as "Best All-Around Chef." He challenged so-called experts across the country, trying to make a dish better than them. The best part of each episode was when Flay would surprise his competitor&mdashcue the happy tears.

It's hard to believe now this competition show was on from just 2006-2011, but again, it's not like we never got to see Bobby again. He is&mdashand will forever be&mdasha Food Network mainstay.


16 Cancelled Food Network Shows You Forgot You Loved

Food Network has brought all kinds of chefs into our living rooms over the past few decades, and with it, some unforgettable shows. Whether they inspired you to get cooking&mdashor just made you really, really hungry&mdashhere are the ones we wish would make a comeback.

Emeril Lagasse came to Food Network in 1995 with his cooking show Essence of Emeril. The chef offered recipes in experimental Creole, AKA the "New New Orleans" style he had become known for in the early '90s. Around this time, he'd made a name for himself at the legendary New Orleans restaurant Commander's Palace, his own restaurant Emeril's, and through his cookbook, Emeril's New New Orleans Cooking.

He made even more of a splash, however, in 1997 with his energetic live show&mdashwhich also featured a studio audience and house band, as well as musical and celebrity guests&mdashEmeril Live.

This is the show that spawned the inimitable catchphrases Lagasse would use when seasoning his food: "Bam," "oh yeah, baby!" and "kick it up a notch!"

If you need more Emeril in your life, he's now partnered with a cruise ship, taking food-filled journeys through the seas.

In an age of speedy time-lapse cooking videos, it's almost difficult to imagine the premise of Cooking Live with Sara Moulton&mdashin which the former executive chef of Gourmet Magazine did, in fact, cook live on the air, taking calls from viewers as she went&mdashbut the show was incredibly successful when it ran from 1996 to 2002.

In fact, it was so successful it then ran again briefly in 2003 and 2004, producing more than 1,200 episodes total. People loved her simplification of usually difficult recipes, and she became one of Food Network's first mega-stars.

Moulton went on to hosts "Sara's Weeknight Meals" on public television and is the author the "Kitchen Wise" Associated Press column. She released her most recent cookbook, Sara Moulton's Home Cooking 101: How to Make Everything Taste Better, a few years back.

Host Ming Tsai actually began his television cooking career while filling in for Sara Moulton during a week she was absent. His own show, East Meets West, premiered not too long after in 1998&mdashthe same year, incidentally, that his Wellesley, MA, restaurant Blue Ginger earned a nomination for Best New Restaurant from the James Beard Foundation.

On the show, Tsai shared recipes in his signature style, combining both Asian and European influences. His success continued from the restaurant to the show, which earned a Daytime Emmy win.

East Meets West went off the air in 2003, but Tsai went on to host Simply Ming on American Public Television since then, and you can check out some of the most recent episodes here.

Boyish, charming, British Jamie Oliver entered the kitchens and hearts of Americans when his BBC-produced show The Naked Chef first aired in America on the Food Network in 1999. The "naked" in the title, to the chagrin of some, referred not to Oliver but to the way he prepared food: simple, yet rich, meals involving minimal effort.

Oliver quickly became a food world sex symbol. Though The Naked Chef ended in 2001, it spawned several other series throughout the years, including Food Network's own Jamie at Home later on.

In the last few years, Oliver has dedicated a great deal of effort on ending childhood obesity&mdashand was made an Honorary Fellow by England's Royal College of General Practitioners for doing so&mdashmost recently by focusing on the problem in a 2015 documentary called Jamie's Sugar Rush.

The legendary chef had been on television before, of course, but it was beginning on the Food Network in 2000 that he had his very own self-titled show. For five seasons, Puck gave insights into his daily life and traveled around the country exploring different regional cuisines, while also cooking and sharing secrets behind the dishes that made him famous.

Once, he even fulfilled a lifelong dream by welcoming the legendary Julia Child onto his show to help him cook Guinea Fowl. Wolfgang Puck added a little bit of luxury to viewer's lives, not to mention killer cooking techniques.

Puck won an Emmy for the series in 2002, and eventually hosted or appeared on several more cooking shows. Puck's restaurants continue to thrive the world over. and no, you probably still can't get a table at Spago.

Reality show Ace of Cakes followed baker Duff Goldman's Baltimore cakery Charm City Cakes as he and his team went above and beyond to create utterly amazing cakes for a variety of events each week, sometimes in a matter of days. The storylines focused not just on cake creation and construction, but small business ownership, interpersonal interactions with the team and clients.

Combining Goldman's backgrounds in metal-smithing and classic pastry-making, these cakes had (and continue to have) everything: sound, movement, smoke. Legend has it the bakery even dreamed up a life-size baby elephant cake once upon a time.

While Ace of Cakes itself ended in 2011 after 10 seasons, Charm City Cakes is alive and kicking in Baltimore and its newest location in Los Angeles. Goldman still appears on a variety of Food Network baking shows, like Worst Bakers in America and the Holiday Baking Championship.

Now this is a show for people who love to eat, featuring where Food Network stars and celebrity chefs love to go on their days off, from breakfast foods to hamburgers to pizza, and more. The restaurants weren't just luxury establishments in big cities, but also mom and pop shops in tiny corners of America, well-loved independent bakeries, and really any place that just had good food.

It humanized favorite Food Network faces, but also gave the viewer the opportunity to go test out some flavors for themselves. The show ran for two years, from 2009-2011, but regularly reruns on the Cooking Channel if you still want to check it out.

While British journalist and food personality Nigella Lawson first made a splash in the U.S. with her show Nigella Bites on E! and Style, her Food Network debut came along with Nigella Feasts in 2006.

Known for sharing recipes that seem complex but are elegant and simple to prepare, Lawson was known as a host who was approachable.

Though Nigella Feasts was only ever meant for one season, it was favorably reviewed everywhere from Time to the New York Daily News. Lawson now regularly makes appearances on shows around the world, publishing cookbooks and even a podcast for the holiday season.

There was nothing about Unwrapped that wasn't a magical combination. The genial and forever lovely Marc Summers? Behind-the-scenes in places that make all of your favorite foods in the world? So. Much. Candy.

The show ran for nine seasons starting in 2001 (a lifetime in those days!), and viewers who missed it after t came off the air needn't have been sad&mdashAlfonso Ribeiro brought back a reboot entitled Unwrapped 2.0 back in 2015.

Rachael Ray taught us all how to dine on a budget with this show that took her on the road looking for the best food deals in the world. It lasted for four seasons, from 2002 to 2005. Her final stop was a trip to New York City.

What's incredible about the show is that it aired during Rachael's tenure as the host of 30-Minute Meals. To this day, people use Rachael's local recommendations as a guide for how to eat their way through certain cities.

Speaking of which, this was the show that empowered many home cooks to feel like they cook balance it all&mdashwork, life, and an easy, nutritious, and quick meal plan they could work through at the end of a long day.

That said, it's hard to speak about the show in the past tense, as Rachael brought it back to life on the Food Network earlier this very year.

Who doesn't look back fondly on the show that kickstarted Giada's career? The show ran for hundreds of episodes starting in 2003, most of which featured light and easy recipes as well as appearances from Giada's loved ones.

Though Giada ended the show shortly before the birth of her firstborn, a lot of her later Food Network projects featured the same gorgeous backdrops, easy-to-follow meals, and, of course, the lovely Giada.

Jeff Mauro found his niche riffing off the crew of misfit chefs on The Kitchen, but before his talk show days, he was the Sandwich King. He made us realize that you can make a case for stuffing anything between two slices of bread, and it would sorta-kinda always work.

And while the Food Network Star's first solo show wasn't long-lived, Jeff continues to do well for himself, often appearing in celeb chef showcases and specials. Oh, and maybe even a Disney production? Only time will tell.

David Rosengarten, host of Taste, was like the original Alton Brown, in that he took a deep dive into a different food every episode. If you ever wanted a 30-minute look into the perfect BLT or oysters, this was it.

At times, Rosengarten's soothing-yet-kinda-sorta-authoritative voice seemed like it belonged to a member of Anchorman's news desk, but as part of the original Food Network line-up, viewers loved him.

The tablescapes&mdashoh, the tablescapes. That's how Sandra Lee referred to her table settings, themed to match the meal she just made. They looked like the result of a long, dark Pinterest binge&mdashbut before Pinterest was even a thing.

The food was adored by people with no time at all, too: All of the recipes always include some pre-made ingredients that you could find at any grocery store.

We all knew Bobby Flay could work a grill, but this was the show that solidified his status as "Best All-Around Chef." He challenged so-called experts across the country, trying to make a dish better than them. The best part of each episode was when Flay would surprise his competitor&mdashcue the happy tears.

It's hard to believe now this competition show was on from just 2006-2011, but again, it's not like we never got to see Bobby again. He is&mdashand will forever be&mdasha Food Network mainstay.


16 Cancelled Food Network Shows You Forgot You Loved

Food Network has brought all kinds of chefs into our living rooms over the past few decades, and with it, some unforgettable shows. Whether they inspired you to get cooking&mdashor just made you really, really hungry&mdashhere are the ones we wish would make a comeback.

Emeril Lagasse came to Food Network in 1995 with his cooking show Essence of Emeril. The chef offered recipes in experimental Creole, AKA the "New New Orleans" style he had become known for in the early '90s. Around this time, he'd made a name for himself at the legendary New Orleans restaurant Commander's Palace, his own restaurant Emeril's, and through his cookbook, Emeril's New New Orleans Cooking.

He made even more of a splash, however, in 1997 with his energetic live show&mdashwhich also featured a studio audience and house band, as well as musical and celebrity guests&mdashEmeril Live.

This is the show that spawned the inimitable catchphrases Lagasse would use when seasoning his food: "Bam," "oh yeah, baby!" and "kick it up a notch!"

If you need more Emeril in your life, he's now partnered with a cruise ship, taking food-filled journeys through the seas.

In an age of speedy time-lapse cooking videos, it's almost difficult to imagine the premise of Cooking Live with Sara Moulton&mdashin which the former executive chef of Gourmet Magazine did, in fact, cook live on the air, taking calls from viewers as she went&mdashbut the show was incredibly successful when it ran from 1996 to 2002.

In fact, it was so successful it then ran again briefly in 2003 and 2004, producing more than 1,200 episodes total. People loved her simplification of usually difficult recipes, and she became one of Food Network's first mega-stars.

Moulton went on to hosts "Sara's Weeknight Meals" on public television and is the author the "Kitchen Wise" Associated Press column. She released her most recent cookbook, Sara Moulton's Home Cooking 101: How to Make Everything Taste Better, a few years back.

Host Ming Tsai actually began his television cooking career while filling in for Sara Moulton during a week she was absent. His own show, East Meets West, premiered not too long after in 1998&mdashthe same year, incidentally, that his Wellesley, MA, restaurant Blue Ginger earned a nomination for Best New Restaurant from the James Beard Foundation.

On the show, Tsai shared recipes in his signature style, combining both Asian and European influences. His success continued from the restaurant to the show, which earned a Daytime Emmy win.

East Meets West went off the air in 2003, but Tsai went on to host Simply Ming on American Public Television since then, and you can check out some of the most recent episodes here.

Boyish, charming, British Jamie Oliver entered the kitchens and hearts of Americans when his BBC-produced show The Naked Chef first aired in America on the Food Network in 1999. The "naked" in the title, to the chagrin of some, referred not to Oliver but to the way he prepared food: simple, yet rich, meals involving minimal effort.

Oliver quickly became a food world sex symbol. Though The Naked Chef ended in 2001, it spawned several other series throughout the years, including Food Network's own Jamie at Home later on.

In the last few years, Oliver has dedicated a great deal of effort on ending childhood obesity&mdashand was made an Honorary Fellow by England's Royal College of General Practitioners for doing so&mdashmost recently by focusing on the problem in a 2015 documentary called Jamie's Sugar Rush.

The legendary chef had been on television before, of course, but it was beginning on the Food Network in 2000 that he had his very own self-titled show. For five seasons, Puck gave insights into his daily life and traveled around the country exploring different regional cuisines, while also cooking and sharing secrets behind the dishes that made him famous.

Once, he even fulfilled a lifelong dream by welcoming the legendary Julia Child onto his show to help him cook Guinea Fowl. Wolfgang Puck added a little bit of luxury to viewer's lives, not to mention killer cooking techniques.

Puck won an Emmy for the series in 2002, and eventually hosted or appeared on several more cooking shows. Puck's restaurants continue to thrive the world over. and no, you probably still can't get a table at Spago.

Reality show Ace of Cakes followed baker Duff Goldman's Baltimore cakery Charm City Cakes as he and his team went above and beyond to create utterly amazing cakes for a variety of events each week, sometimes in a matter of days. The storylines focused not just on cake creation and construction, but small business ownership, interpersonal interactions with the team and clients.

Combining Goldman's backgrounds in metal-smithing and classic pastry-making, these cakes had (and continue to have) everything: sound, movement, smoke. Legend has it the bakery even dreamed up a life-size baby elephant cake once upon a time.

While Ace of Cakes itself ended in 2011 after 10 seasons, Charm City Cakes is alive and kicking in Baltimore and its newest location in Los Angeles. Goldman still appears on a variety of Food Network baking shows, like Worst Bakers in America and the Holiday Baking Championship.

Now this is a show for people who love to eat, featuring where Food Network stars and celebrity chefs love to go on their days off, from breakfast foods to hamburgers to pizza, and more. The restaurants weren't just luxury establishments in big cities, but also mom and pop shops in tiny corners of America, well-loved independent bakeries, and really any place that just had good food.

It humanized favorite Food Network faces, but also gave the viewer the opportunity to go test out some flavors for themselves. The show ran for two years, from 2009-2011, but regularly reruns on the Cooking Channel if you still want to check it out.

While British journalist and food personality Nigella Lawson first made a splash in the U.S. with her show Nigella Bites on E! and Style, her Food Network debut came along with Nigella Feasts in 2006.

Known for sharing recipes that seem complex but are elegant and simple to prepare, Lawson was known as a host who was approachable.

Though Nigella Feasts was only ever meant for one season, it was favorably reviewed everywhere from Time to the New York Daily News. Lawson now regularly makes appearances on shows around the world, publishing cookbooks and even a podcast for the holiday season.

There was nothing about Unwrapped that wasn't a magical combination. The genial and forever lovely Marc Summers? Behind-the-scenes in places that make all of your favorite foods in the world? So. Much. Candy.

The show ran for nine seasons starting in 2001 (a lifetime in those days!), and viewers who missed it after t came off the air needn't have been sad&mdashAlfonso Ribeiro brought back a reboot entitled Unwrapped 2.0 back in 2015.

Rachael Ray taught us all how to dine on a budget with this show that took her on the road looking for the best food deals in the world. It lasted for four seasons, from 2002 to 2005. Her final stop was a trip to New York City.

What's incredible about the show is that it aired during Rachael's tenure as the host of 30-Minute Meals. To this day, people use Rachael's local recommendations as a guide for how to eat their way through certain cities.

Speaking of which, this was the show that empowered many home cooks to feel like they cook balance it all&mdashwork, life, and an easy, nutritious, and quick meal plan they could work through at the end of a long day.

That said, it's hard to speak about the show in the past tense, as Rachael brought it back to life on the Food Network earlier this very year.

Who doesn't look back fondly on the show that kickstarted Giada's career? The show ran for hundreds of episodes starting in 2003, most of which featured light and easy recipes as well as appearances from Giada's loved ones.

Though Giada ended the show shortly before the birth of her firstborn, a lot of her later Food Network projects featured the same gorgeous backdrops, easy-to-follow meals, and, of course, the lovely Giada.

Jeff Mauro found his niche riffing off the crew of misfit chefs on The Kitchen, but before his talk show days, he was the Sandwich King. He made us realize that you can make a case for stuffing anything between two slices of bread, and it would sorta-kinda always work.

And while the Food Network Star's first solo show wasn't long-lived, Jeff continues to do well for himself, often appearing in celeb chef showcases and specials. Oh, and maybe even a Disney production? Only time will tell.

David Rosengarten, host of Taste, was like the original Alton Brown, in that he took a deep dive into a different food every episode. If you ever wanted a 30-minute look into the perfect BLT or oysters, this was it.

At times, Rosengarten's soothing-yet-kinda-sorta-authoritative voice seemed like it belonged to a member of Anchorman's news desk, but as part of the original Food Network line-up, viewers loved him.

The tablescapes&mdashoh, the tablescapes. That's how Sandra Lee referred to her table settings, themed to match the meal she just made. They looked like the result of a long, dark Pinterest binge&mdashbut before Pinterest was even a thing.

The food was adored by people with no time at all, too: All of the recipes always include some pre-made ingredients that you could find at any grocery store.

We all knew Bobby Flay could work a grill, but this was the show that solidified his status as "Best All-Around Chef." He challenged so-called experts across the country, trying to make a dish better than them. The best part of each episode was when Flay would surprise his competitor&mdashcue the happy tears.

It's hard to believe now this competition show was on from just 2006-2011, but again, it's not like we never got to see Bobby again. He is&mdashand will forever be&mdasha Food Network mainstay.


16 Cancelled Food Network Shows You Forgot You Loved

Food Network has brought all kinds of chefs into our living rooms over the past few decades, and with it, some unforgettable shows. Whether they inspired you to get cooking&mdashor just made you really, really hungry&mdashhere are the ones we wish would make a comeback.

Emeril Lagasse came to Food Network in 1995 with his cooking show Essence of Emeril. The chef offered recipes in experimental Creole, AKA the "New New Orleans" style he had become known for in the early '90s. Around this time, he'd made a name for himself at the legendary New Orleans restaurant Commander's Palace, his own restaurant Emeril's, and through his cookbook, Emeril's New New Orleans Cooking.

He made even more of a splash, however, in 1997 with his energetic live show&mdashwhich also featured a studio audience and house band, as well as musical and celebrity guests&mdashEmeril Live.

This is the show that spawned the inimitable catchphrases Lagasse would use when seasoning his food: "Bam," "oh yeah, baby!" and "kick it up a notch!"

If you need more Emeril in your life, he's now partnered with a cruise ship, taking food-filled journeys through the seas.

In an age of speedy time-lapse cooking videos, it's almost difficult to imagine the premise of Cooking Live with Sara Moulton&mdashin which the former executive chef of Gourmet Magazine did, in fact, cook live on the air, taking calls from viewers as she went&mdashbut the show was incredibly successful when it ran from 1996 to 2002.

In fact, it was so successful it then ran again briefly in 2003 and 2004, producing more than 1,200 episodes total. People loved her simplification of usually difficult recipes, and she became one of Food Network's first mega-stars.

Moulton went on to hosts "Sara's Weeknight Meals" on public television and is the author the "Kitchen Wise" Associated Press column. She released her most recent cookbook, Sara Moulton's Home Cooking 101: How to Make Everything Taste Better, a few years back.

Host Ming Tsai actually began his television cooking career while filling in for Sara Moulton during a week she was absent. His own show, East Meets West, premiered not too long after in 1998&mdashthe same year, incidentally, that his Wellesley, MA, restaurant Blue Ginger earned a nomination for Best New Restaurant from the James Beard Foundation.

On the show, Tsai shared recipes in his signature style, combining both Asian and European influences. His success continued from the restaurant to the show, which earned a Daytime Emmy win.

East Meets West went off the air in 2003, but Tsai went on to host Simply Ming on American Public Television since then, and you can check out some of the most recent episodes here.

Boyish, charming, British Jamie Oliver entered the kitchens and hearts of Americans when his BBC-produced show The Naked Chef first aired in America on the Food Network in 1999. The "naked" in the title, to the chagrin of some, referred not to Oliver but to the way he prepared food: simple, yet rich, meals involving minimal effort.

Oliver quickly became a food world sex symbol. Though The Naked Chef ended in 2001, it spawned several other series throughout the years, including Food Network's own Jamie at Home later on.

In the last few years, Oliver has dedicated a great deal of effort on ending childhood obesity&mdashand was made an Honorary Fellow by England's Royal College of General Practitioners for doing so&mdashmost recently by focusing on the problem in a 2015 documentary called Jamie's Sugar Rush.

The legendary chef had been on television before, of course, but it was beginning on the Food Network in 2000 that he had his very own self-titled show. For five seasons, Puck gave insights into his daily life and traveled around the country exploring different regional cuisines, while also cooking and sharing secrets behind the dishes that made him famous.

Once, he even fulfilled a lifelong dream by welcoming the legendary Julia Child onto his show to help him cook Guinea Fowl. Wolfgang Puck added a little bit of luxury to viewer's lives, not to mention killer cooking techniques.

Puck won an Emmy for the series in 2002, and eventually hosted or appeared on several more cooking shows. Puck's restaurants continue to thrive the world over. and no, you probably still can't get a table at Spago.

Reality show Ace of Cakes followed baker Duff Goldman's Baltimore cakery Charm City Cakes as he and his team went above and beyond to create utterly amazing cakes for a variety of events each week, sometimes in a matter of days. The storylines focused not just on cake creation and construction, but small business ownership, interpersonal interactions with the team and clients.

Combining Goldman's backgrounds in metal-smithing and classic pastry-making, these cakes had (and continue to have) everything: sound, movement, smoke. Legend has it the bakery even dreamed up a life-size baby elephant cake once upon a time.

While Ace of Cakes itself ended in 2011 after 10 seasons, Charm City Cakes is alive and kicking in Baltimore and its newest location in Los Angeles. Goldman still appears on a variety of Food Network baking shows, like Worst Bakers in America and the Holiday Baking Championship.

Now this is a show for people who love to eat, featuring where Food Network stars and celebrity chefs love to go on their days off, from breakfast foods to hamburgers to pizza, and more. The restaurants weren't just luxury establishments in big cities, but also mom and pop shops in tiny corners of America, well-loved independent bakeries, and really any place that just had good food.

It humanized favorite Food Network faces, but also gave the viewer the opportunity to go test out some flavors for themselves. The show ran for two years, from 2009-2011, but regularly reruns on the Cooking Channel if you still want to check it out.

While British journalist and food personality Nigella Lawson first made a splash in the U.S. with her show Nigella Bites on E! and Style, her Food Network debut came along with Nigella Feasts in 2006.

Known for sharing recipes that seem complex but are elegant and simple to prepare, Lawson was known as a host who was approachable.

Though Nigella Feasts was only ever meant for one season, it was favorably reviewed everywhere from Time to the New York Daily News. Lawson now regularly makes appearances on shows around the world, publishing cookbooks and even a podcast for the holiday season.

There was nothing about Unwrapped that wasn't a magical combination. The genial and forever lovely Marc Summers? Behind-the-scenes in places that make all of your favorite foods in the world? So. Much. Candy.

The show ran for nine seasons starting in 2001 (a lifetime in those days!), and viewers who missed it after t came off the air needn't have been sad&mdashAlfonso Ribeiro brought back a reboot entitled Unwrapped 2.0 back in 2015.

Rachael Ray taught us all how to dine on a budget with this show that took her on the road looking for the best food deals in the world. It lasted for four seasons, from 2002 to 2005. Her final stop was a trip to New York City.

What's incredible about the show is that it aired during Rachael's tenure as the host of 30-Minute Meals. To this day, people use Rachael's local recommendations as a guide for how to eat their way through certain cities.

Speaking of which, this was the show that empowered many home cooks to feel like they cook balance it all&mdashwork, life, and an easy, nutritious, and quick meal plan they could work through at the end of a long day.

That said, it's hard to speak about the show in the past tense, as Rachael brought it back to life on the Food Network earlier this very year.

Who doesn't look back fondly on the show that kickstarted Giada's career? The show ran for hundreds of episodes starting in 2003, most of which featured light and easy recipes as well as appearances from Giada's loved ones.

Though Giada ended the show shortly before the birth of her firstborn, a lot of her later Food Network projects featured the same gorgeous backdrops, easy-to-follow meals, and, of course, the lovely Giada.

Jeff Mauro found his niche riffing off the crew of misfit chefs on The Kitchen, but before his talk show days, he was the Sandwich King. He made us realize that you can make a case for stuffing anything between two slices of bread, and it would sorta-kinda always work.

And while the Food Network Star's first solo show wasn't long-lived, Jeff continues to do well for himself, often appearing in celeb chef showcases and specials. Oh, and maybe even a Disney production? Only time will tell.

David Rosengarten, host of Taste, was like the original Alton Brown, in that he took a deep dive into a different food every episode. If you ever wanted a 30-minute look into the perfect BLT or oysters, this was it.

At times, Rosengarten's soothing-yet-kinda-sorta-authoritative voice seemed like it belonged to a member of Anchorman's news desk, but as part of the original Food Network line-up, viewers loved him.

The tablescapes&mdashoh, the tablescapes. That's how Sandra Lee referred to her table settings, themed to match the meal she just made. They looked like the result of a long, dark Pinterest binge&mdashbut before Pinterest was even a thing.

The food was adored by people with no time at all, too: All of the recipes always include some pre-made ingredients that you could find at any grocery store.

We all knew Bobby Flay could work a grill, but this was the show that solidified his status as "Best All-Around Chef." He challenged so-called experts across the country, trying to make a dish better than them. The best part of each episode was when Flay would surprise his competitor&mdashcue the happy tears.

It's hard to believe now this competition show was on from just 2006-2011, but again, it's not like we never got to see Bobby again. He is&mdashand will forever be&mdasha Food Network mainstay.


16 Cancelled Food Network Shows You Forgot You Loved

Food Network has brought all kinds of chefs into our living rooms over the past few decades, and with it, some unforgettable shows. Whether they inspired you to get cooking&mdashor just made you really, really hungry&mdashhere are the ones we wish would make a comeback.

Emeril Lagasse came to Food Network in 1995 with his cooking show Essence of Emeril. The chef offered recipes in experimental Creole, AKA the "New New Orleans" style he had become known for in the early '90s. Around this time, he'd made a name for himself at the legendary New Orleans restaurant Commander's Palace, his own restaurant Emeril's, and through his cookbook, Emeril's New New Orleans Cooking.

He made even more of a splash, however, in 1997 with his energetic live show&mdashwhich also featured a studio audience and house band, as well as musical and celebrity guests&mdashEmeril Live.

This is the show that spawned the inimitable catchphrases Lagasse would use when seasoning his food: "Bam," "oh yeah, baby!" and "kick it up a notch!"

If you need more Emeril in your life, he's now partnered with a cruise ship, taking food-filled journeys through the seas.

In an age of speedy time-lapse cooking videos, it's almost difficult to imagine the premise of Cooking Live with Sara Moulton&mdashin which the former executive chef of Gourmet Magazine did, in fact, cook live on the air, taking calls from viewers as she went&mdashbut the show was incredibly successful when it ran from 1996 to 2002.

In fact, it was so successful it then ran again briefly in 2003 and 2004, producing more than 1,200 episodes total. People loved her simplification of usually difficult recipes, and she became one of Food Network's first mega-stars.

Moulton went on to hosts "Sara's Weeknight Meals" on public television and is the author the "Kitchen Wise" Associated Press column. She released her most recent cookbook, Sara Moulton's Home Cooking 101: How to Make Everything Taste Better, a few years back.

Host Ming Tsai actually began his television cooking career while filling in for Sara Moulton during a week she was absent. His own show, East Meets West, premiered not too long after in 1998&mdashthe same year, incidentally, that his Wellesley, MA, restaurant Blue Ginger earned a nomination for Best New Restaurant from the James Beard Foundation.

On the show, Tsai shared recipes in his signature style, combining both Asian and European influences. His success continued from the restaurant to the show, which earned a Daytime Emmy win.

East Meets West went off the air in 2003, but Tsai went on to host Simply Ming on American Public Television since then, and you can check out some of the most recent episodes here.

Boyish, charming, British Jamie Oliver entered the kitchens and hearts of Americans when his BBC-produced show The Naked Chef first aired in America on the Food Network in 1999. The "naked" in the title, to the chagrin of some, referred not to Oliver but to the way he prepared food: simple, yet rich, meals involving minimal effort.

Oliver quickly became a food world sex symbol. Though The Naked Chef ended in 2001, it spawned several other series throughout the years, including Food Network's own Jamie at Home later on.

In the last few years, Oliver has dedicated a great deal of effort on ending childhood obesity&mdashand was made an Honorary Fellow by England's Royal College of General Practitioners for doing so&mdashmost recently by focusing on the problem in a 2015 documentary called Jamie's Sugar Rush.

The legendary chef had been on television before, of course, but it was beginning on the Food Network in 2000 that he had his very own self-titled show. For five seasons, Puck gave insights into his daily life and traveled around the country exploring different regional cuisines, while also cooking and sharing secrets behind the dishes that made him famous.

Once, he even fulfilled a lifelong dream by welcoming the legendary Julia Child onto his show to help him cook Guinea Fowl. Wolfgang Puck added a little bit of luxury to viewer's lives, not to mention killer cooking techniques.

Puck won an Emmy for the series in 2002, and eventually hosted or appeared on several more cooking shows. Puck's restaurants continue to thrive the world over. and no, you probably still can't get a table at Spago.

Reality show Ace of Cakes followed baker Duff Goldman's Baltimore cakery Charm City Cakes as he and his team went above and beyond to create utterly amazing cakes for a variety of events each week, sometimes in a matter of days. The storylines focused not just on cake creation and construction, but small business ownership, interpersonal interactions with the team and clients.

Combining Goldman's backgrounds in metal-smithing and classic pastry-making, these cakes had (and continue to have) everything: sound, movement, smoke. Legend has it the bakery even dreamed up a life-size baby elephant cake once upon a time.

While Ace of Cakes itself ended in 2011 after 10 seasons, Charm City Cakes is alive and kicking in Baltimore and its newest location in Los Angeles. Goldman still appears on a variety of Food Network baking shows, like Worst Bakers in America and the Holiday Baking Championship.

Now this is a show for people who love to eat, featuring where Food Network stars and celebrity chefs love to go on their days off, from breakfast foods to hamburgers to pizza, and more. The restaurants weren't just luxury establishments in big cities, but also mom and pop shops in tiny corners of America, well-loved independent bakeries, and really any place that just had good food.

It humanized favorite Food Network faces, but also gave the viewer the opportunity to go test out some flavors for themselves. The show ran for two years, from 2009-2011, but regularly reruns on the Cooking Channel if you still want to check it out.

While British journalist and food personality Nigella Lawson first made a splash in the U.S. with her show Nigella Bites on E! and Style, her Food Network debut came along with Nigella Feasts in 2006.

Known for sharing recipes that seem complex but are elegant and simple to prepare, Lawson was known as a host who was approachable.

Though Nigella Feasts was only ever meant for one season, it was favorably reviewed everywhere from Time to the New York Daily News. Lawson now regularly makes appearances on shows around the world, publishing cookbooks and even a podcast for the holiday season.

There was nothing about Unwrapped that wasn't a magical combination. The genial and forever lovely Marc Summers? Behind-the-scenes in places that make all of your favorite foods in the world? So. Much. Candy.

The show ran for nine seasons starting in 2001 (a lifetime in those days!), and viewers who missed it after t came off the air needn't have been sad&mdashAlfonso Ribeiro brought back a reboot entitled Unwrapped 2.0 back in 2015.

Rachael Ray taught us all how to dine on a budget with this show that took her on the road looking for the best food deals in the world. It lasted for four seasons, from 2002 to 2005. Her final stop was a trip to New York City.

What's incredible about the show is that it aired during Rachael's tenure as the host of 30-Minute Meals. To this day, people use Rachael's local recommendations as a guide for how to eat their way through certain cities.

Speaking of which, this was the show that empowered many home cooks to feel like they cook balance it all&mdashwork, life, and an easy, nutritious, and quick meal plan they could work through at the end of a long day.

That said, it's hard to speak about the show in the past tense, as Rachael brought it back to life on the Food Network earlier this very year.

Who doesn't look back fondly on the show that kickstarted Giada's career? The show ran for hundreds of episodes starting in 2003, most of which featured light and easy recipes as well as appearances from Giada's loved ones.

Though Giada ended the show shortly before the birth of her firstborn, a lot of her later Food Network projects featured the same gorgeous backdrops, easy-to-follow meals, and, of course, the lovely Giada.

Jeff Mauro found his niche riffing off the crew of misfit chefs on The Kitchen, but before his talk show days, he was the Sandwich King. He made us realize that you can make a case for stuffing anything between two slices of bread, and it would sorta-kinda always work.

And while the Food Network Star's first solo show wasn't long-lived, Jeff continues to do well for himself, often appearing in celeb chef showcases and specials. Oh, and maybe even a Disney production? Only time will tell.

David Rosengarten, host of Taste, was like the original Alton Brown, in that he took a deep dive into a different food every episode. If you ever wanted a 30-minute look into the perfect BLT or oysters, this was it.

At times, Rosengarten's soothing-yet-kinda-sorta-authoritative voice seemed like it belonged to a member of Anchorman's news desk, but as part of the original Food Network line-up, viewers loved him.

The tablescapes&mdashoh, the tablescapes. That's how Sandra Lee referred to her table settings, themed to match the meal she just made. They looked like the result of a long, dark Pinterest binge&mdashbut before Pinterest was even a thing.

The food was adored by people with no time at all, too: All of the recipes always include some pre-made ingredients that you could find at any grocery store.

We all knew Bobby Flay could work a grill, but this was the show that solidified his status as "Best All-Around Chef." He challenged so-called experts across the country, trying to make a dish better than them. The best part of each episode was when Flay would surprise his competitor&mdashcue the happy tears.

It's hard to believe now this competition show was on from just 2006-2011, but again, it's not like we never got to see Bobby again. He is&mdashand will forever be&mdasha Food Network mainstay.


16 Cancelled Food Network Shows You Forgot You Loved

Food Network has brought all kinds of chefs into our living rooms over the past few decades, and with it, some unforgettable shows. Whether they inspired you to get cooking&mdashor just made you really, really hungry&mdashhere are the ones we wish would make a comeback.

Emeril Lagasse came to Food Network in 1995 with his cooking show Essence of Emeril. The chef offered recipes in experimental Creole, AKA the "New New Orleans" style he had become known for in the early '90s. Around this time, he'd made a name for himself at the legendary New Orleans restaurant Commander's Palace, his own restaurant Emeril's, and through his cookbook, Emeril's New New Orleans Cooking.

He made even more of a splash, however, in 1997 with his energetic live show&mdashwhich also featured a studio audience and house band, as well as musical and celebrity guests&mdashEmeril Live.

This is the show that spawned the inimitable catchphrases Lagasse would use when seasoning his food: "Bam," "oh yeah, baby!" and "kick it up a notch!"

If you need more Emeril in your life, he's now partnered with a cruise ship, taking food-filled journeys through the seas.

In an age of speedy time-lapse cooking videos, it's almost difficult to imagine the premise of Cooking Live with Sara Moulton&mdashin which the former executive chef of Gourmet Magazine did, in fact, cook live on the air, taking calls from viewers as she went&mdashbut the show was incredibly successful when it ran from 1996 to 2002.

In fact, it was so successful it then ran again briefly in 2003 and 2004, producing more than 1,200 episodes total. People loved her simplification of usually difficult recipes, and she became one of Food Network's first mega-stars.

Moulton went on to hosts "Sara's Weeknight Meals" on public television and is the author the "Kitchen Wise" Associated Press column. She released her most recent cookbook, Sara Moulton's Home Cooking 101: How to Make Everything Taste Better, a few years back.

Host Ming Tsai actually began his television cooking career while filling in for Sara Moulton during a week she was absent. His own show, East Meets West, premiered not too long after in 1998&mdashthe same year, incidentally, that his Wellesley, MA, restaurant Blue Ginger earned a nomination for Best New Restaurant from the James Beard Foundation.

On the show, Tsai shared recipes in his signature style, combining both Asian and European influences. His success continued from the restaurant to the show, which earned a Daytime Emmy win.

East Meets West went off the air in 2003, but Tsai went on to host Simply Ming on American Public Television since then, and you can check out some of the most recent episodes here.

Boyish, charming, British Jamie Oliver entered the kitchens and hearts of Americans when his BBC-produced show The Naked Chef first aired in America on the Food Network in 1999. The "naked" in the title, to the chagrin of some, referred not to Oliver but to the way he prepared food: simple, yet rich, meals involving minimal effort.

Oliver quickly became a food world sex symbol. Though The Naked Chef ended in 2001, it spawned several other series throughout the years, including Food Network's own Jamie at Home later on.

In the last few years, Oliver has dedicated a great deal of effort on ending childhood obesity&mdashand was made an Honorary Fellow by England's Royal College of General Practitioners for doing so&mdashmost recently by focusing on the problem in a 2015 documentary called Jamie's Sugar Rush.

The legendary chef had been on television before, of course, but it was beginning on the Food Network in 2000 that he had his very own self-titled show. For five seasons, Puck gave insights into his daily life and traveled around the country exploring different regional cuisines, while also cooking and sharing secrets behind the dishes that made him famous.

Once, he even fulfilled a lifelong dream by welcoming the legendary Julia Child onto his show to help him cook Guinea Fowl. Wolfgang Puck added a little bit of luxury to viewer's lives, not to mention killer cooking techniques.

Puck won an Emmy for the series in 2002, and eventually hosted or appeared on several more cooking shows. Puck's restaurants continue to thrive the world over. and no, you probably still can't get a table at Spago.

Reality show Ace of Cakes followed baker Duff Goldman's Baltimore cakery Charm City Cakes as he and his team went above and beyond to create utterly amazing cakes for a variety of events each week, sometimes in a matter of days. The storylines focused not just on cake creation and construction, but small business ownership, interpersonal interactions with the team and clients.

Combining Goldman's backgrounds in metal-smithing and classic pastry-making, these cakes had (and continue to have) everything: sound, movement, smoke. Legend has it the bakery even dreamed up a life-size baby elephant cake once upon a time.

While Ace of Cakes itself ended in 2011 after 10 seasons, Charm City Cakes is alive and kicking in Baltimore and its newest location in Los Angeles. Goldman still appears on a variety of Food Network baking shows, like Worst Bakers in America and the Holiday Baking Championship.

Now this is a show for people who love to eat, featuring where Food Network stars and celebrity chefs love to go on their days off, from breakfast foods to hamburgers to pizza, and more. The restaurants weren't just luxury establishments in big cities, but also mom and pop shops in tiny corners of America, well-loved independent bakeries, and really any place that just had good food.

It humanized favorite Food Network faces, but also gave the viewer the opportunity to go test out some flavors for themselves. The show ran for two years, from 2009-2011, but regularly reruns on the Cooking Channel if you still want to check it out.

While British journalist and food personality Nigella Lawson first made a splash in the U.S. with her show Nigella Bites on E! and Style, her Food Network debut came along with Nigella Feasts in 2006.

Known for sharing recipes that seem complex but are elegant and simple to prepare, Lawson was known as a host who was approachable.

Though Nigella Feasts was only ever meant for one season, it was favorably reviewed everywhere from Time to the New York Daily News. Lawson now regularly makes appearances on shows around the world, publishing cookbooks and even a podcast for the holiday season.

There was nothing about Unwrapped that wasn't a magical combination. The genial and forever lovely Marc Summers? Behind-the-scenes in places that make all of your favorite foods in the world? So. Much. Candy.

The show ran for nine seasons starting in 2001 (a lifetime in those days!), and viewers who missed it after t came off the air needn't have been sad&mdashAlfonso Ribeiro brought back a reboot entitled Unwrapped 2.0 back in 2015.

Rachael Ray taught us all how to dine on a budget with this show that took her on the road looking for the best food deals in the world. It lasted for four seasons, from 2002 to 2005. Her final stop was a trip to New York City.

What's incredible about the show is that it aired during Rachael's tenure as the host of 30-Minute Meals. To this day, people use Rachael's local recommendations as a guide for how to eat their way through certain cities.

Speaking of which, this was the show that empowered many home cooks to feel like they cook balance it all&mdashwork, life, and an easy, nutritious, and quick meal plan they could work through at the end of a long day.

That said, it's hard to speak about the show in the past tense, as Rachael brought it back to life on the Food Network earlier this very year.

Who doesn't look back fondly on the show that kickstarted Giada's career? The show ran for hundreds of episodes starting in 2003, most of which featured light and easy recipes as well as appearances from Giada's loved ones.

Though Giada ended the show shortly before the birth of her firstborn, a lot of her later Food Network projects featured the same gorgeous backdrops, easy-to-follow meals, and, of course, the lovely Giada.

Jeff Mauro found his niche riffing off the crew of misfit chefs on The Kitchen, but before his talk show days, he was the Sandwich King. He made us realize that you can make a case for stuffing anything between two slices of bread, and it would sorta-kinda always work.

And while the Food Network Star's first solo show wasn't long-lived, Jeff continues to do well for himself, often appearing in celeb chef showcases and specials. Oh, and maybe even a Disney production? Only time will tell.

David Rosengarten, host of Taste, was like the original Alton Brown, in that he took a deep dive into a different food every episode. If you ever wanted a 30-minute look into the perfect BLT or oysters, this was it.

At times, Rosengarten's soothing-yet-kinda-sorta-authoritative voice seemed like it belonged to a member of Anchorman's news desk, but as part of the original Food Network line-up, viewers loved him.

The tablescapes&mdashoh, the tablescapes. That's how Sandra Lee referred to her table settings, themed to match the meal she just made. They looked like the result of a long, dark Pinterest binge&mdashbut before Pinterest was even a thing.

The food was adored by people with no time at all, too: All of the recipes always include some pre-made ingredients that you could find at any grocery store.

We all knew Bobby Flay could work a grill, but this was the show that solidified his status as "Best All-Around Chef." He challenged so-called experts across the country, trying to make a dish better than them. The best part of each episode was when Flay would surprise his competitor&mdashcue the happy tears.

It's hard to believe now this competition show was on from just 2006-2011, but again, it's not like we never got to see Bobby again. He is&mdashand will forever be&mdasha Food Network mainstay.


16 Cancelled Food Network Shows You Forgot You Loved

Food Network has brought all kinds of chefs into our living rooms over the past few decades, and with it, some unforgettable shows. Whether they inspired you to get cooking&mdashor just made you really, really hungry&mdashhere are the ones we wish would make a comeback.

Emeril Lagasse came to Food Network in 1995 with his cooking show Essence of Emeril. The chef offered recipes in experimental Creole, AKA the "New New Orleans" style he had become known for in the early '90s. Around this time, he'd made a name for himself at the legendary New Orleans restaurant Commander's Palace, his own restaurant Emeril's, and through his cookbook, Emeril's New New Orleans Cooking.

He made even more of a splash, however, in 1997 with his energetic live show&mdashwhich also featured a studio audience and house band, as well as musical and celebrity guests&mdashEmeril Live.

This is the show that spawned the inimitable catchphrases Lagasse would use when seasoning his food: "Bam," "oh yeah, baby!" and "kick it up a notch!"

If you need more Emeril in your life, he's now partnered with a cruise ship, taking food-filled journeys through the seas.

In an age of speedy time-lapse cooking videos, it's almost difficult to imagine the premise of Cooking Live with Sara Moulton&mdashin which the former executive chef of Gourmet Magazine did, in fact, cook live on the air, taking calls from viewers as she went&mdashbut the show was incredibly successful when it ran from 1996 to 2002.

In fact, it was so successful it then ran again briefly in 2003 and 2004, producing more than 1,200 episodes total. People loved her simplification of usually difficult recipes, and she became one of Food Network's first mega-stars.

Moulton went on to hosts "Sara's Weeknight Meals" on public television and is the author the "Kitchen Wise" Associated Press column. She released her most recent cookbook, Sara Moulton's Home Cooking 101: How to Make Everything Taste Better, a few years back.

Host Ming Tsai actually began his television cooking career while filling in for Sara Moulton during a week she was absent. His own show, East Meets West, premiered not too long after in 1998&mdashthe same year, incidentally, that his Wellesley, MA, restaurant Blue Ginger earned a nomination for Best New Restaurant from the James Beard Foundation.

On the show, Tsai shared recipes in his signature style, combining both Asian and European influences. His success continued from the restaurant to the show, which earned a Daytime Emmy win.

East Meets West went off the air in 2003, but Tsai went on to host Simply Ming on American Public Television since then, and you can check out some of the most recent episodes here.

Boyish, charming, British Jamie Oliver entered the kitchens and hearts of Americans when his BBC-produced show The Naked Chef first aired in America on the Food Network in 1999. The "naked" in the title, to the chagrin of some, referred not to Oliver but to the way he prepared food: simple, yet rich, meals involving minimal effort.

Oliver quickly became a food world sex symbol. Though The Naked Chef ended in 2001, it spawned several other series throughout the years, including Food Network's own Jamie at Home later on.

In the last few years, Oliver has dedicated a great deal of effort on ending childhood obesity&mdashand was made an Honorary Fellow by England's Royal College of General Practitioners for doing so&mdashmost recently by focusing on the problem in a 2015 documentary called Jamie's Sugar Rush.

The legendary chef had been on television before, of course, but it was beginning on the Food Network in 2000 that he had his very own self-titled show. For five seasons, Puck gave insights into his daily life and traveled around the country exploring different regional cuisines, while also cooking and sharing secrets behind the dishes that made him famous.

Once, he even fulfilled a lifelong dream by welcoming the legendary Julia Child onto his show to help him cook Guinea Fowl. Wolfgang Puck added a little bit of luxury to viewer's lives, not to mention killer cooking techniques.

Puck won an Emmy for the series in 2002, and eventually hosted or appeared on several more cooking shows. Puck's restaurants continue to thrive the world over. and no, you probably still can't get a table at Spago.

Reality show Ace of Cakes followed baker Duff Goldman's Baltimore cakery Charm City Cakes as he and his team went above and beyond to create utterly amazing cakes for a variety of events each week, sometimes in a matter of days. The storylines focused not just on cake creation and construction, but small business ownership, interpersonal interactions with the team and clients.

Combining Goldman's backgrounds in metal-smithing and classic pastry-making, these cakes had (and continue to have) everything: sound, movement, smoke. Legend has it the bakery even dreamed up a life-size baby elephant cake once upon a time.

While Ace of Cakes itself ended in 2011 after 10 seasons, Charm City Cakes is alive and kicking in Baltimore and its newest location in Los Angeles. Goldman still appears on a variety of Food Network baking shows, like Worst Bakers in America and the Holiday Baking Championship.

Now this is a show for people who love to eat, featuring where Food Network stars and celebrity chefs love to go on their days off, from breakfast foods to hamburgers to pizza, and more. The restaurants weren't just luxury establishments in big cities, but also mom and pop shops in tiny corners of America, well-loved independent bakeries, and really any place that just had good food.

It humanized favorite Food Network faces, but also gave the viewer the opportunity to go test out some flavors for themselves. The show ran for two years, from 2009-2011, but regularly reruns on the Cooking Channel if you still want to check it out.

While British journalist and food personality Nigella Lawson first made a splash in the U.S. with her show Nigella Bites on E! and Style, her Food Network debut came along with Nigella Feasts in 2006.

Known for sharing recipes that seem complex but are elegant and simple to prepare, Lawson was known as a host who was approachable.

Though Nigella Feasts was only ever meant for one season, it was favorably reviewed everywhere from Time to the New York Daily News. Lawson now regularly makes appearances on shows around the world, publishing cookbooks and even a podcast for the holiday season.

There was nothing about Unwrapped that wasn't a magical combination. The genial and forever lovely Marc Summers? Behind-the-scenes in places that make all of your favorite foods in the world? So. Much. Candy.

The show ran for nine seasons starting in 2001 (a lifetime in those days!), and viewers who missed it after t came off the air needn't have been sad&mdashAlfonso Ribeiro brought back a reboot entitled Unwrapped 2.0 back in 2015.

Rachael Ray taught us all how to dine on a budget with this show that took her on the road looking for the best food deals in the world. It lasted for four seasons, from 2002 to 2005. Her final stop was a trip to New York City.

What's incredible about the show is that it aired during Rachael's tenure as the host of 30-Minute Meals. To this day, people use Rachael's local recommendations as a guide for how to eat their way through certain cities.

Speaking of which, this was the show that empowered many home cooks to feel like they cook balance it all&mdashwork, life, and an easy, nutritious, and quick meal plan they could work through at the end of a long day.

That said, it's hard to speak about the show in the past tense, as Rachael brought it back to life on the Food Network earlier this very year.

Who doesn't look back fondly on the show that kickstarted Giada's career? The show ran for hundreds of episodes starting in 2003, most of which featured light and easy recipes as well as appearances from Giada's loved ones.

Though Giada ended the show shortly before the birth of her firstborn, a lot of her later Food Network projects featured the same gorgeous backdrops, easy-to-follow meals, and, of course, the lovely Giada.

Jeff Mauro found his niche riffing off the crew of misfit chefs on The Kitchen, but before his talk show days, he was the Sandwich King. He made us realize that you can make a case for stuffing anything between two slices of bread, and it would sorta-kinda always work.

And while the Food Network Star's first solo show wasn't long-lived, Jeff continues to do well for himself, often appearing in celeb chef showcases and specials. Oh, and maybe even a Disney production? Only time will tell.

David Rosengarten, host of Taste, was like the original Alton Brown, in that he took a deep dive into a different food every episode. If you ever wanted a 30-minute look into the perfect BLT or oysters, this was it.

At times, Rosengarten's soothing-yet-kinda-sorta-authoritative voice seemed like it belonged to a member of Anchorman's news desk, but as part of the original Food Network line-up, viewers loved him.

The tablescapes&mdashoh, the tablescapes. That's how Sandra Lee referred to her table settings, themed to match the meal she just made. They looked like the result of a long, dark Pinterest binge&mdashbut before Pinterest was even a thing.

The food was adored by people with no time at all, too: All of the recipes always include some pre-made ingredients that you could find at any grocery store.

We all knew Bobby Flay could work a grill, but this was the show that solidified his status as "Best All-Around Chef." He challenged so-called experts across the country, trying to make a dish better than them. The best part of each episode was when Flay would surprise his competitor&mdashcue the happy tears.

It's hard to believe now this competition show was on from just 2006-2011, but again, it's not like we never got to see Bobby again. He is&mdashand will forever be&mdasha Food Network mainstay.


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