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5 Bites of Copenhagen Slideshow


Our contributor rounds-up the 5 essential bites in Copenhagen

Lyst

Breakfast is quite the affair for the Danes and not to be missed! Head to Lyst in the trendy Nørrebro neighborhood to experience the Danish version of brunch. There are two options, meat or vegetarian. Whichever you choose, the meals are served on wooden cutting boards with a variety of little bits and bites to enjoy. From tiny pancakes to scrambled eggs and parsnip chips to rye bread (rugbrød), each component is uniquely delicious and completely Danish.

The Coffee Collective

The Scandinavians consume the most coffee per capita annually, so they must know something about the brew. Stop by The Coffee Collective, with several locations throughout the city, to try it for yourself. The interior is minimally decorated, with only a few seats, putting all the focus on the coffee. If it’s a nice day, drink your coffee on the benches outside and soak up the atmosphere. Espresso-based drinks and drip coffee are equally good.

Torvehallerne Market

Go to Torvehallerne market and wander the stalls to work up an appetite. For a traditional lunch, opt for the smørrebrød from Hallernes — an open-faced sandwich that is described as Denmark’s national meal. The toppings for smørrebrød are seemingly endless and always look like a work of art. Choose the herring sampler to sample two Danish specialities at once. If herring isn’t your thing, you can find smørrebrød topped with cheese, eggs, beef and smoked salmon as well.

Hanses Familiehave

For those of us who can’t get a Noma reservation, a traditional Danish meal in a biergarten is the next best thing. Head to Hansens Familiehave in well-heeled Frederiksberg to enjoy an authentic Danish food with the denizens of Copenhagen. Opt for a Carlsberg on tap and make sure your meal comes with some potatoes and lingonberry jam (yes, like they sell at IKEA). As for mains, the fish is fantastic, the meat is prepared in a traditional manner and there are a couple of vegetarian options if you’re so moved.

Lagkagehuset

Danish pastries may be well known, but there’s more to the country’s desserts than danishes and butter cookies. Lagkagehuset has several locations across the city and for good reason. Try a slice of lagekage — layer cake and the bakery’s namesake — or a two-layered cookie filled with jam that tastes like an improved Danish version of a pop tart. You’re sure to be wishing Danish desserts were easier to find in America!


Brent Ehrler's 5 favorite Senko rigs

“If I could have just one soft plastic in my boat, it would be a standard 5-inch Yamamoto Senko in green pumpkin or some version of junebug or black with blue flake,” Ehrler said. “As long as I have my hook and weight box with me, I can adapt a Senko to match nearly any fishing condition I encounter.”

“What makes a Senko unique is its ‘shimmy’ or ‘quiver’ as it falls through the water column – it looks very natural,” Ehrler detailed. “No matter how you rig it, that subtle quivering during the fall is always happening to some degree.”

From left to right, Ehrler’s five Senko faves include: 1) the classic Texas-rigged weightless Senko 2) a nail weight Senko 3) a weightless wacky-rigged Senko 4) a Texas-rigged weighted Senko for flipping and pitching and 5) a drop shot with the Senko wacky-rigged on the hook. He clarified he relies on all five rigs throughout a season and this picture does not necessarily depict any order of preference.

“This is an awesome rig in the spring when blind casting around scattered vegetation for spawning fish,” Ehrler said. “Don’t try to work this rig, just cast it out and dead stick it – let it fall on slack line so it can shimmy on its own. Once it hits the bottom, pull it up once and let it free fall again. Then reel it in and cast it again. In my experience, 90 percent of the bites on this rig come on the initial fall.”

“The weighted Texas rig is by far the most universal of all the Senko rigs,” Ehrler revealed. “I have one of these tied on in my rod box at all times, no matter where we fish. It’s an absolute staple in my boat. I can cast it, pitch it, flip it and use it in any water clarity on any kind of cover. I generally fish it on 16-pound test Sunline FC Sniper fluorocarbon, but I’ve used it on braid as well, especially around tough, wiry vegetation in Florida.”

Ehrler notes this rig was responsible for his catches at the Elite Series on the Chesapeake in 2015 and the St. Johns River in 2016.

Ehrler’s recipe for a standard wacky rig is to stick a 1/0 Gamakatsu B10S Stinger hook through the “egg sack” (the smooth area) located about 1/3 of the way down on a Senko. The B10S hook is a specialty hook made for tying flies, but its unique design makes it the best wacky-rig hook Ehrler has found.

“The weightless wacky rig is killer for skipping under docks and around bushes,” Ehrler said. “I usually fish it on a spinning outfit with 12 pound-test SX1 braid tied to an 8-pound test leader of Sunline Super FC Sniper. When bass are chasing bream in the postspawn, the wacky rig is hard to beat.”

“The important thing with a nail weight rig is to use an O-ring on the Senko,” Ehrler revealed. “When I’m fishing a regular wacky rig, I just put the hook through the Senko. But since this rig has a weight in it, that soft plastic will tear more easily when making casts. The O-ring absorbs the G-force of the cast and saves wear and tear on the plastic.”

“Honestly, when I use this technique, I prefer the smaller 4-inch Senko, but I can make it work with the standard 5-inch one, too. It’s a killer on smallmouth on lakes like Champlain, St. Clair and Erie. When fishing this rig I use a 14-inch leader from the weight to the hook to give the Senko plenty of room to shimmy back down to the bottom when I lift and drop the bait. The idea is to keep the weight on the bottom and just lift and drop the Senko so it quivers naturally during the fall.”


Brent Ehrler's 5 favorite Senko rigs

“If I could have just one soft plastic in my boat, it would be a standard 5-inch Yamamoto Senko in green pumpkin or some version of junebug or black with blue flake,” Ehrler said. “As long as I have my hook and weight box with me, I can adapt a Senko to match nearly any fishing condition I encounter.”

“What makes a Senko unique is its ‘shimmy’ or ‘quiver’ as it falls through the water column – it looks very natural,” Ehrler detailed. “No matter how you rig it, that subtle quivering during the fall is always happening to some degree.”

From left to right, Ehrler’s five Senko faves include: 1) the classic Texas-rigged weightless Senko 2) a nail weight Senko 3) a weightless wacky-rigged Senko 4) a Texas-rigged weighted Senko for flipping and pitching and 5) a drop shot with the Senko wacky-rigged on the hook. He clarified he relies on all five rigs throughout a season and this picture does not necessarily depict any order of preference.

“This is an awesome rig in the spring when blind casting around scattered vegetation for spawning fish,” Ehrler said. “Don’t try to work this rig, just cast it out and dead stick it – let it fall on slack line so it can shimmy on its own. Once it hits the bottom, pull it up once and let it free fall again. Then reel it in and cast it again. In my experience, 90 percent of the bites on this rig come on the initial fall.”

“The weighted Texas rig is by far the most universal of all the Senko rigs,” Ehrler revealed. “I have one of these tied on in my rod box at all times, no matter where we fish. It’s an absolute staple in my boat. I can cast it, pitch it, flip it and use it in any water clarity on any kind of cover. I generally fish it on 16-pound test Sunline FC Sniper fluorocarbon, but I’ve used it on braid as well, especially around tough, wiry vegetation in Florida.”

Ehrler notes this rig was responsible for his catches at the Elite Series on the Chesapeake in 2015 and the St. Johns River in 2016.

Ehrler’s recipe for a standard wacky rig is to stick a 1/0 Gamakatsu B10S Stinger hook through the “egg sack” (the smooth area) located about 1/3 of the way down on a Senko. The B10S hook is a specialty hook made for tying flies, but its unique design makes it the best wacky-rig hook Ehrler has found.

“The weightless wacky rig is killer for skipping under docks and around bushes,” Ehrler said. “I usually fish it on a spinning outfit with 12 pound-test SX1 braid tied to an 8-pound test leader of Sunline Super FC Sniper. When bass are chasing bream in the postspawn, the wacky rig is hard to beat.”

“The important thing with a nail weight rig is to use an O-ring on the Senko,” Ehrler revealed. “When I’m fishing a regular wacky rig, I just put the hook through the Senko. But since this rig has a weight in it, that soft plastic will tear more easily when making casts. The O-ring absorbs the G-force of the cast and saves wear and tear on the plastic.”

“Honestly, when I use this technique, I prefer the smaller 4-inch Senko, but I can make it work with the standard 5-inch one, too. It’s a killer on smallmouth on lakes like Champlain, St. Clair and Erie. When fishing this rig I use a 14-inch leader from the weight to the hook to give the Senko plenty of room to shimmy back down to the bottom when I lift and drop the bait. The idea is to keep the weight on the bottom and just lift and drop the Senko so it quivers naturally during the fall.”


Brent Ehrler's 5 favorite Senko rigs

“If I could have just one soft plastic in my boat, it would be a standard 5-inch Yamamoto Senko in green pumpkin or some version of junebug or black with blue flake,” Ehrler said. “As long as I have my hook and weight box with me, I can adapt a Senko to match nearly any fishing condition I encounter.”

“What makes a Senko unique is its ‘shimmy’ or ‘quiver’ as it falls through the water column – it looks very natural,” Ehrler detailed. “No matter how you rig it, that subtle quivering during the fall is always happening to some degree.”

From left to right, Ehrler’s five Senko faves include: 1) the classic Texas-rigged weightless Senko 2) a nail weight Senko 3) a weightless wacky-rigged Senko 4) a Texas-rigged weighted Senko for flipping and pitching and 5) a drop shot with the Senko wacky-rigged on the hook. He clarified he relies on all five rigs throughout a season and this picture does not necessarily depict any order of preference.

“This is an awesome rig in the spring when blind casting around scattered vegetation for spawning fish,” Ehrler said. “Don’t try to work this rig, just cast it out and dead stick it – let it fall on slack line so it can shimmy on its own. Once it hits the bottom, pull it up once and let it free fall again. Then reel it in and cast it again. In my experience, 90 percent of the bites on this rig come on the initial fall.”

“The weighted Texas rig is by far the most universal of all the Senko rigs,” Ehrler revealed. “I have one of these tied on in my rod box at all times, no matter where we fish. It’s an absolute staple in my boat. I can cast it, pitch it, flip it and use it in any water clarity on any kind of cover. I generally fish it on 16-pound test Sunline FC Sniper fluorocarbon, but I’ve used it on braid as well, especially around tough, wiry vegetation in Florida.”

Ehrler notes this rig was responsible for his catches at the Elite Series on the Chesapeake in 2015 and the St. Johns River in 2016.

Ehrler’s recipe for a standard wacky rig is to stick a 1/0 Gamakatsu B10S Stinger hook through the “egg sack” (the smooth area) located about 1/3 of the way down on a Senko. The B10S hook is a specialty hook made for tying flies, but its unique design makes it the best wacky-rig hook Ehrler has found.

“The weightless wacky rig is killer for skipping under docks and around bushes,” Ehrler said. “I usually fish it on a spinning outfit with 12 pound-test SX1 braid tied to an 8-pound test leader of Sunline Super FC Sniper. When bass are chasing bream in the postspawn, the wacky rig is hard to beat.”

“The important thing with a nail weight rig is to use an O-ring on the Senko,” Ehrler revealed. “When I’m fishing a regular wacky rig, I just put the hook through the Senko. But since this rig has a weight in it, that soft plastic will tear more easily when making casts. The O-ring absorbs the G-force of the cast and saves wear and tear on the plastic.”

“Honestly, when I use this technique, I prefer the smaller 4-inch Senko, but I can make it work with the standard 5-inch one, too. It’s a killer on smallmouth on lakes like Champlain, St. Clair and Erie. When fishing this rig I use a 14-inch leader from the weight to the hook to give the Senko plenty of room to shimmy back down to the bottom when I lift and drop the bait. The idea is to keep the weight on the bottom and just lift and drop the Senko so it quivers naturally during the fall.”


Brent Ehrler's 5 favorite Senko rigs

“If I could have just one soft plastic in my boat, it would be a standard 5-inch Yamamoto Senko in green pumpkin or some version of junebug or black with blue flake,” Ehrler said. “As long as I have my hook and weight box with me, I can adapt a Senko to match nearly any fishing condition I encounter.”

“What makes a Senko unique is its ‘shimmy’ or ‘quiver’ as it falls through the water column – it looks very natural,” Ehrler detailed. “No matter how you rig it, that subtle quivering during the fall is always happening to some degree.”

From left to right, Ehrler’s five Senko faves include: 1) the classic Texas-rigged weightless Senko 2) a nail weight Senko 3) a weightless wacky-rigged Senko 4) a Texas-rigged weighted Senko for flipping and pitching and 5) a drop shot with the Senko wacky-rigged on the hook. He clarified he relies on all five rigs throughout a season and this picture does not necessarily depict any order of preference.

“This is an awesome rig in the spring when blind casting around scattered vegetation for spawning fish,” Ehrler said. “Don’t try to work this rig, just cast it out and dead stick it – let it fall on slack line so it can shimmy on its own. Once it hits the bottom, pull it up once and let it free fall again. Then reel it in and cast it again. In my experience, 90 percent of the bites on this rig come on the initial fall.”

“The weighted Texas rig is by far the most universal of all the Senko rigs,” Ehrler revealed. “I have one of these tied on in my rod box at all times, no matter where we fish. It’s an absolute staple in my boat. I can cast it, pitch it, flip it and use it in any water clarity on any kind of cover. I generally fish it on 16-pound test Sunline FC Sniper fluorocarbon, but I’ve used it on braid as well, especially around tough, wiry vegetation in Florida.”

Ehrler notes this rig was responsible for his catches at the Elite Series on the Chesapeake in 2015 and the St. Johns River in 2016.

Ehrler’s recipe for a standard wacky rig is to stick a 1/0 Gamakatsu B10S Stinger hook through the “egg sack” (the smooth area) located about 1/3 of the way down on a Senko. The B10S hook is a specialty hook made for tying flies, but its unique design makes it the best wacky-rig hook Ehrler has found.

“The weightless wacky rig is killer for skipping under docks and around bushes,” Ehrler said. “I usually fish it on a spinning outfit with 12 pound-test SX1 braid tied to an 8-pound test leader of Sunline Super FC Sniper. When bass are chasing bream in the postspawn, the wacky rig is hard to beat.”

“The important thing with a nail weight rig is to use an O-ring on the Senko,” Ehrler revealed. “When I’m fishing a regular wacky rig, I just put the hook through the Senko. But since this rig has a weight in it, that soft plastic will tear more easily when making casts. The O-ring absorbs the G-force of the cast and saves wear and tear on the plastic.”

“Honestly, when I use this technique, I prefer the smaller 4-inch Senko, but I can make it work with the standard 5-inch one, too. It’s a killer on smallmouth on lakes like Champlain, St. Clair and Erie. When fishing this rig I use a 14-inch leader from the weight to the hook to give the Senko plenty of room to shimmy back down to the bottom when I lift and drop the bait. The idea is to keep the weight on the bottom and just lift and drop the Senko so it quivers naturally during the fall.”


Brent Ehrler's 5 favorite Senko rigs

“If I could have just one soft plastic in my boat, it would be a standard 5-inch Yamamoto Senko in green pumpkin or some version of junebug or black with blue flake,” Ehrler said. “As long as I have my hook and weight box with me, I can adapt a Senko to match nearly any fishing condition I encounter.”

“What makes a Senko unique is its ‘shimmy’ or ‘quiver’ as it falls through the water column – it looks very natural,” Ehrler detailed. “No matter how you rig it, that subtle quivering during the fall is always happening to some degree.”

From left to right, Ehrler’s five Senko faves include: 1) the classic Texas-rigged weightless Senko 2) a nail weight Senko 3) a weightless wacky-rigged Senko 4) a Texas-rigged weighted Senko for flipping and pitching and 5) a drop shot with the Senko wacky-rigged on the hook. He clarified he relies on all five rigs throughout a season and this picture does not necessarily depict any order of preference.

“This is an awesome rig in the spring when blind casting around scattered vegetation for spawning fish,” Ehrler said. “Don’t try to work this rig, just cast it out and dead stick it – let it fall on slack line so it can shimmy on its own. Once it hits the bottom, pull it up once and let it free fall again. Then reel it in and cast it again. In my experience, 90 percent of the bites on this rig come on the initial fall.”

“The weighted Texas rig is by far the most universal of all the Senko rigs,” Ehrler revealed. “I have one of these tied on in my rod box at all times, no matter where we fish. It’s an absolute staple in my boat. I can cast it, pitch it, flip it and use it in any water clarity on any kind of cover. I generally fish it on 16-pound test Sunline FC Sniper fluorocarbon, but I’ve used it on braid as well, especially around tough, wiry vegetation in Florida.”

Ehrler notes this rig was responsible for his catches at the Elite Series on the Chesapeake in 2015 and the St. Johns River in 2016.

Ehrler’s recipe for a standard wacky rig is to stick a 1/0 Gamakatsu B10S Stinger hook through the “egg sack” (the smooth area) located about 1/3 of the way down on a Senko. The B10S hook is a specialty hook made for tying flies, but its unique design makes it the best wacky-rig hook Ehrler has found.

“The weightless wacky rig is killer for skipping under docks and around bushes,” Ehrler said. “I usually fish it on a spinning outfit with 12 pound-test SX1 braid tied to an 8-pound test leader of Sunline Super FC Sniper. When bass are chasing bream in the postspawn, the wacky rig is hard to beat.”

“The important thing with a nail weight rig is to use an O-ring on the Senko,” Ehrler revealed. “When I’m fishing a regular wacky rig, I just put the hook through the Senko. But since this rig has a weight in it, that soft plastic will tear more easily when making casts. The O-ring absorbs the G-force of the cast and saves wear and tear on the plastic.”

“Honestly, when I use this technique, I prefer the smaller 4-inch Senko, but I can make it work with the standard 5-inch one, too. It’s a killer on smallmouth on lakes like Champlain, St. Clair and Erie. When fishing this rig I use a 14-inch leader from the weight to the hook to give the Senko plenty of room to shimmy back down to the bottom when I lift and drop the bait. The idea is to keep the weight on the bottom and just lift and drop the Senko so it quivers naturally during the fall.”


Brent Ehrler's 5 favorite Senko rigs

“If I could have just one soft plastic in my boat, it would be a standard 5-inch Yamamoto Senko in green pumpkin or some version of junebug or black with blue flake,” Ehrler said. “As long as I have my hook and weight box with me, I can adapt a Senko to match nearly any fishing condition I encounter.”

“What makes a Senko unique is its ‘shimmy’ or ‘quiver’ as it falls through the water column – it looks very natural,” Ehrler detailed. “No matter how you rig it, that subtle quivering during the fall is always happening to some degree.”

From left to right, Ehrler’s five Senko faves include: 1) the classic Texas-rigged weightless Senko 2) a nail weight Senko 3) a weightless wacky-rigged Senko 4) a Texas-rigged weighted Senko for flipping and pitching and 5) a drop shot with the Senko wacky-rigged on the hook. He clarified he relies on all five rigs throughout a season and this picture does not necessarily depict any order of preference.

“This is an awesome rig in the spring when blind casting around scattered vegetation for spawning fish,” Ehrler said. “Don’t try to work this rig, just cast it out and dead stick it – let it fall on slack line so it can shimmy on its own. Once it hits the bottom, pull it up once and let it free fall again. Then reel it in and cast it again. In my experience, 90 percent of the bites on this rig come on the initial fall.”

“The weighted Texas rig is by far the most universal of all the Senko rigs,” Ehrler revealed. “I have one of these tied on in my rod box at all times, no matter where we fish. It’s an absolute staple in my boat. I can cast it, pitch it, flip it and use it in any water clarity on any kind of cover. I generally fish it on 16-pound test Sunline FC Sniper fluorocarbon, but I’ve used it on braid as well, especially around tough, wiry vegetation in Florida.”

Ehrler notes this rig was responsible for his catches at the Elite Series on the Chesapeake in 2015 and the St. Johns River in 2016.

Ehrler’s recipe for a standard wacky rig is to stick a 1/0 Gamakatsu B10S Stinger hook through the “egg sack” (the smooth area) located about 1/3 of the way down on a Senko. The B10S hook is a specialty hook made for tying flies, but its unique design makes it the best wacky-rig hook Ehrler has found.

“The weightless wacky rig is killer for skipping under docks and around bushes,” Ehrler said. “I usually fish it on a spinning outfit with 12 pound-test SX1 braid tied to an 8-pound test leader of Sunline Super FC Sniper. When bass are chasing bream in the postspawn, the wacky rig is hard to beat.”

“The important thing with a nail weight rig is to use an O-ring on the Senko,” Ehrler revealed. “When I’m fishing a regular wacky rig, I just put the hook through the Senko. But since this rig has a weight in it, that soft plastic will tear more easily when making casts. The O-ring absorbs the G-force of the cast and saves wear and tear on the plastic.”

“Honestly, when I use this technique, I prefer the smaller 4-inch Senko, but I can make it work with the standard 5-inch one, too. It’s a killer on smallmouth on lakes like Champlain, St. Clair and Erie. When fishing this rig I use a 14-inch leader from the weight to the hook to give the Senko plenty of room to shimmy back down to the bottom when I lift and drop the bait. The idea is to keep the weight on the bottom and just lift and drop the Senko so it quivers naturally during the fall.”


Brent Ehrler's 5 favorite Senko rigs

“If I could have just one soft plastic in my boat, it would be a standard 5-inch Yamamoto Senko in green pumpkin or some version of junebug or black with blue flake,” Ehrler said. “As long as I have my hook and weight box with me, I can adapt a Senko to match nearly any fishing condition I encounter.”

“What makes a Senko unique is its ‘shimmy’ or ‘quiver’ as it falls through the water column – it looks very natural,” Ehrler detailed. “No matter how you rig it, that subtle quivering during the fall is always happening to some degree.”

From left to right, Ehrler’s five Senko faves include: 1) the classic Texas-rigged weightless Senko 2) a nail weight Senko 3) a weightless wacky-rigged Senko 4) a Texas-rigged weighted Senko for flipping and pitching and 5) a drop shot with the Senko wacky-rigged on the hook. He clarified he relies on all five rigs throughout a season and this picture does not necessarily depict any order of preference.

“This is an awesome rig in the spring when blind casting around scattered vegetation for spawning fish,” Ehrler said. “Don’t try to work this rig, just cast it out and dead stick it – let it fall on slack line so it can shimmy on its own. Once it hits the bottom, pull it up once and let it free fall again. Then reel it in and cast it again. In my experience, 90 percent of the bites on this rig come on the initial fall.”

“The weighted Texas rig is by far the most universal of all the Senko rigs,” Ehrler revealed. “I have one of these tied on in my rod box at all times, no matter where we fish. It’s an absolute staple in my boat. I can cast it, pitch it, flip it and use it in any water clarity on any kind of cover. I generally fish it on 16-pound test Sunline FC Sniper fluorocarbon, but I’ve used it on braid as well, especially around tough, wiry vegetation in Florida.”

Ehrler notes this rig was responsible for his catches at the Elite Series on the Chesapeake in 2015 and the St. Johns River in 2016.

Ehrler’s recipe for a standard wacky rig is to stick a 1/0 Gamakatsu B10S Stinger hook through the “egg sack” (the smooth area) located about 1/3 of the way down on a Senko. The B10S hook is a specialty hook made for tying flies, but its unique design makes it the best wacky-rig hook Ehrler has found.

“The weightless wacky rig is killer for skipping under docks and around bushes,” Ehrler said. “I usually fish it on a spinning outfit with 12 pound-test SX1 braid tied to an 8-pound test leader of Sunline Super FC Sniper. When bass are chasing bream in the postspawn, the wacky rig is hard to beat.”

“The important thing with a nail weight rig is to use an O-ring on the Senko,” Ehrler revealed. “When I’m fishing a regular wacky rig, I just put the hook through the Senko. But since this rig has a weight in it, that soft plastic will tear more easily when making casts. The O-ring absorbs the G-force of the cast and saves wear and tear on the plastic.”

“Honestly, when I use this technique, I prefer the smaller 4-inch Senko, but I can make it work with the standard 5-inch one, too. It’s a killer on smallmouth on lakes like Champlain, St. Clair and Erie. When fishing this rig I use a 14-inch leader from the weight to the hook to give the Senko plenty of room to shimmy back down to the bottom when I lift and drop the bait. The idea is to keep the weight on the bottom and just lift and drop the Senko so it quivers naturally during the fall.”


Brent Ehrler's 5 favorite Senko rigs

“If I could have just one soft plastic in my boat, it would be a standard 5-inch Yamamoto Senko in green pumpkin or some version of junebug or black with blue flake,” Ehrler said. “As long as I have my hook and weight box with me, I can adapt a Senko to match nearly any fishing condition I encounter.”

“What makes a Senko unique is its ‘shimmy’ or ‘quiver’ as it falls through the water column – it looks very natural,” Ehrler detailed. “No matter how you rig it, that subtle quivering during the fall is always happening to some degree.”

From left to right, Ehrler’s five Senko faves include: 1) the classic Texas-rigged weightless Senko 2) a nail weight Senko 3) a weightless wacky-rigged Senko 4) a Texas-rigged weighted Senko for flipping and pitching and 5) a drop shot with the Senko wacky-rigged on the hook. He clarified he relies on all five rigs throughout a season and this picture does not necessarily depict any order of preference.

“This is an awesome rig in the spring when blind casting around scattered vegetation for spawning fish,” Ehrler said. “Don’t try to work this rig, just cast it out and dead stick it – let it fall on slack line so it can shimmy on its own. Once it hits the bottom, pull it up once and let it free fall again. Then reel it in and cast it again. In my experience, 90 percent of the bites on this rig come on the initial fall.”

“The weighted Texas rig is by far the most universal of all the Senko rigs,” Ehrler revealed. “I have one of these tied on in my rod box at all times, no matter where we fish. It’s an absolute staple in my boat. I can cast it, pitch it, flip it and use it in any water clarity on any kind of cover. I generally fish it on 16-pound test Sunline FC Sniper fluorocarbon, but I’ve used it on braid as well, especially around tough, wiry vegetation in Florida.”

Ehrler notes this rig was responsible for his catches at the Elite Series on the Chesapeake in 2015 and the St. Johns River in 2016.

Ehrler’s recipe for a standard wacky rig is to stick a 1/0 Gamakatsu B10S Stinger hook through the “egg sack” (the smooth area) located about 1/3 of the way down on a Senko. The B10S hook is a specialty hook made for tying flies, but its unique design makes it the best wacky-rig hook Ehrler has found.

“The weightless wacky rig is killer for skipping under docks and around bushes,” Ehrler said. “I usually fish it on a spinning outfit with 12 pound-test SX1 braid tied to an 8-pound test leader of Sunline Super FC Sniper. When bass are chasing bream in the postspawn, the wacky rig is hard to beat.”

“The important thing with a nail weight rig is to use an O-ring on the Senko,” Ehrler revealed. “When I’m fishing a regular wacky rig, I just put the hook through the Senko. But since this rig has a weight in it, that soft plastic will tear more easily when making casts. The O-ring absorbs the G-force of the cast and saves wear and tear on the plastic.”

“Honestly, when I use this technique, I prefer the smaller 4-inch Senko, but I can make it work with the standard 5-inch one, too. It’s a killer on smallmouth on lakes like Champlain, St. Clair and Erie. When fishing this rig I use a 14-inch leader from the weight to the hook to give the Senko plenty of room to shimmy back down to the bottom when I lift and drop the bait. The idea is to keep the weight on the bottom and just lift and drop the Senko so it quivers naturally during the fall.”


Brent Ehrler's 5 favorite Senko rigs

“If I could have just one soft plastic in my boat, it would be a standard 5-inch Yamamoto Senko in green pumpkin or some version of junebug or black with blue flake,” Ehrler said. “As long as I have my hook and weight box with me, I can adapt a Senko to match nearly any fishing condition I encounter.”

“What makes a Senko unique is its ‘shimmy’ or ‘quiver’ as it falls through the water column – it looks very natural,” Ehrler detailed. “No matter how you rig it, that subtle quivering during the fall is always happening to some degree.”

From left to right, Ehrler’s five Senko faves include: 1) the classic Texas-rigged weightless Senko 2) a nail weight Senko 3) a weightless wacky-rigged Senko 4) a Texas-rigged weighted Senko for flipping and pitching and 5) a drop shot with the Senko wacky-rigged on the hook. He clarified he relies on all five rigs throughout a season and this picture does not necessarily depict any order of preference.

“This is an awesome rig in the spring when blind casting around scattered vegetation for spawning fish,” Ehrler said. “Don’t try to work this rig, just cast it out and dead stick it – let it fall on slack line so it can shimmy on its own. Once it hits the bottom, pull it up once and let it free fall again. Then reel it in and cast it again. In my experience, 90 percent of the bites on this rig come on the initial fall.”

“The weighted Texas rig is by far the most universal of all the Senko rigs,” Ehrler revealed. “I have one of these tied on in my rod box at all times, no matter where we fish. It’s an absolute staple in my boat. I can cast it, pitch it, flip it and use it in any water clarity on any kind of cover. I generally fish it on 16-pound test Sunline FC Sniper fluorocarbon, but I’ve used it on braid as well, especially around tough, wiry vegetation in Florida.”

Ehrler notes this rig was responsible for his catches at the Elite Series on the Chesapeake in 2015 and the St. Johns River in 2016.

Ehrler’s recipe for a standard wacky rig is to stick a 1/0 Gamakatsu B10S Stinger hook through the “egg sack” (the smooth area) located about 1/3 of the way down on a Senko. The B10S hook is a specialty hook made for tying flies, but its unique design makes it the best wacky-rig hook Ehrler has found.

“The weightless wacky rig is killer for skipping under docks and around bushes,” Ehrler said. “I usually fish it on a spinning outfit with 12 pound-test SX1 braid tied to an 8-pound test leader of Sunline Super FC Sniper. When bass are chasing bream in the postspawn, the wacky rig is hard to beat.”

“The important thing with a nail weight rig is to use an O-ring on the Senko,” Ehrler revealed. “When I’m fishing a regular wacky rig, I just put the hook through the Senko. But since this rig has a weight in it, that soft plastic will tear more easily when making casts. The O-ring absorbs the G-force of the cast and saves wear and tear on the plastic.”

“Honestly, when I use this technique, I prefer the smaller 4-inch Senko, but I can make it work with the standard 5-inch one, too. It’s a killer on smallmouth on lakes like Champlain, St. Clair and Erie. When fishing this rig I use a 14-inch leader from the weight to the hook to give the Senko plenty of room to shimmy back down to the bottom when I lift and drop the bait. The idea is to keep the weight on the bottom and just lift and drop the Senko so it quivers naturally during the fall.”


Brent Ehrler's 5 favorite Senko rigs

“If I could have just one soft plastic in my boat, it would be a standard 5-inch Yamamoto Senko in green pumpkin or some version of junebug or black with blue flake,” Ehrler said. “As long as I have my hook and weight box with me, I can adapt a Senko to match nearly any fishing condition I encounter.”

“What makes a Senko unique is its ‘shimmy’ or ‘quiver’ as it falls through the water column – it looks very natural,” Ehrler detailed. “No matter how you rig it, that subtle quivering during the fall is always happening to some degree.”

From left to right, Ehrler’s five Senko faves include: 1) the classic Texas-rigged weightless Senko 2) a nail weight Senko 3) a weightless wacky-rigged Senko 4) a Texas-rigged weighted Senko for flipping and pitching and 5) a drop shot with the Senko wacky-rigged on the hook. He clarified he relies on all five rigs throughout a season and this picture does not necessarily depict any order of preference.

“This is an awesome rig in the spring when blind casting around scattered vegetation for spawning fish,” Ehrler said. “Don’t try to work this rig, just cast it out and dead stick it – let it fall on slack line so it can shimmy on its own. Once it hits the bottom, pull it up once and let it free fall again. Then reel it in and cast it again. In my experience, 90 percent of the bites on this rig come on the initial fall.”

“The weighted Texas rig is by far the most universal of all the Senko rigs,” Ehrler revealed. “I have one of these tied on in my rod box at all times, no matter where we fish. It’s an absolute staple in my boat. I can cast it, pitch it, flip it and use it in any water clarity on any kind of cover. I generally fish it on 16-pound test Sunline FC Sniper fluorocarbon, but I’ve used it on braid as well, especially around tough, wiry vegetation in Florida.”

Ehrler notes this rig was responsible for his catches at the Elite Series on the Chesapeake in 2015 and the St. Johns River in 2016.

Ehrler’s recipe for a standard wacky rig is to stick a 1/0 Gamakatsu B10S Stinger hook through the “egg sack” (the smooth area) located about 1/3 of the way down on a Senko. The B10S hook is a specialty hook made for tying flies, but its unique design makes it the best wacky-rig hook Ehrler has found.

“The weightless wacky rig is killer for skipping under docks and around bushes,” Ehrler said. “I usually fish it on a spinning outfit with 12 pound-test SX1 braid tied to an 8-pound test leader of Sunline Super FC Sniper. When bass are chasing bream in the postspawn, the wacky rig is hard to beat.”

“The important thing with a nail weight rig is to use an O-ring on the Senko,” Ehrler revealed. “When I’m fishing a regular wacky rig, I just put the hook through the Senko. But since this rig has a weight in it, that soft plastic will tear more easily when making casts. The O-ring absorbs the G-force of the cast and saves wear and tear on the plastic.”

“Honestly, when I use this technique, I prefer the smaller 4-inch Senko, but I can make it work with the standard 5-inch one, too. It’s a killer on smallmouth on lakes like Champlain, St. Clair and Erie. When fishing this rig I use a 14-inch leader from the weight to the hook to give the Senko plenty of room to shimmy back down to the bottom when I lift and drop the bait. The idea is to keep the weight on the bottom and just lift and drop the Senko so it quivers naturally during the fall.”


Watch the video: Copenhagen January 2016 Slideshow (October 2021).