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Skirt Steak with Romesco Sauce


This thick Spanish sauce, made with roasted red peppers and almonds, is also delicious on grilled or roasted scallions, chicken, and fish.

Ingredients

Romesco

  • 1 tomato (about 6 oz.), quartered
  • 1 tablespoon Tbsp. plus 1 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 slice 4x4x½” slice crusty white bread, cut into ½” cubes
  • ½ cup cup almonds, toasted
  • ½ cup cup hazelnuts, toasted, skins rubbed off
  • 2 tablespoon Tbsp. red wine vinegar

Steak

  • 2 tablespoon Tbsp. kosher salt
  • 2 teaspoon tsp. fennel seeds, toasted, ground
  • 1½ teaspoon tsp. freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon tsp. cayenne pepper
  • 1 teaspoon tsp. garlic powder
  • 1 2-lb. skirt steak or flank steak

Recipe Preparation

Romesco

  • Preheat oven to 400°. Place tomato in a small glass baking dish. Drizzle with 1 Tbsp. oil and scatter thyme sprigs over. Season with salt and pepper. Roast, stirring occasionally, until tomato is completely soft, about 30 minutes. Scatter bread cubes over tomato. Roast until bread is light golden and crisp, about 10 minutes longer. Let cool slightly; discard thyme sprigs.

  • Meanwhile, char bell pepper directly over a gas flame or under broiler, turning occasionally with tongs, until blackened all over. Transfer to a large bowl; cover with plastic wrap and let stand for 15 minutes. Peel, stem, and core bell pepper.

  • Pulse remaining 1 cup oil, tomato mixture, bell pepper, and next 4 ingredients in a food processor until smooth. Add water by tablespoonfuls to thin, if desired.

Steak

  • Stir first 6 ingredients in a small bowl to blend. Rub spice mixture into steak.

  • Build a medium-hot fire in a charcoal grill, or heat a gas grill to high. Grill steak until charred and cooked to desired doneness, 10–12 minutes for medium-rare.

  • Transfer steak to a cutting board and let rest for 5 minutes. Thinly slice against the grain. Serve with romesco sauce.

Recipe by No. 246, Decatur, GA,

Nutritional Content

One serving contains:Calories (kcal) 1040Fat (g) 87Saturated Fat (g) 14Cholesterol (mg) 75Carbohydrates (g) 17Dietary Fiber (g) 5Total Sugars (g) 7Protein (g) 55Sodium (mg) 1720

Related Video

Andy Makes Skirt Steak with Romesco Sauce

Reviews Section

Sunday BBQ: Grilled Skirt Steak With Romesco

If someone were to ask me which condiment deserves the title of most underrated sauce, I'd probably say romesco, the classic sauce from Catalan that's made from dried, roasted red peppers, almonds, and olive oil. Romesco adds spectacular smokiness to just about anything, and that includes bold proteins. Use it as an accompaniment for unadorned steak, freshly charred from the barbecue serve grilled asparagus and scallions, which also pair well with the sauce, with the meal. For the speedy Summer recipe, read on.


Skirt Steak with Hazelnut Romesco

Recipe adapted from Drew Belline, No. 246, Decatur, GA

Cook Time: 1 hour 30 minutes

Ingredients

Romesco Sauce:

4 Roma tomatoes, quartered

¾ cup plus 2½ tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon olive oil, divided

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

1 cup cubed day-old bread, toasted in olive oil

Skirt Steak:

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

Directions

1. Make the romesco sauce: Preheat the oven to 300°. Season the tomatoes and peppers with 2 tablespoons of the olive oil, salt and pepper and place on a baking sheet. Slice the top of the head of garlic off, leaving the root intact. Season with salt, pepper and ½ tablespoon of olive oil. Wrap the garlic in foil and bake, along with the tomatoes and the peppers, until the garlic is soft, the tomatoes have begun to caramelize and the peppers are tender and beginning to blister, about 1 hour. Remove from the oven, cover the peppers with foil and set aside for 10 minutes, then peel the skin and remove the seeds and veins from the peppers.

2. In a small skillet set over medium heat, toast the almonds and hazelnuts with 1 teaspoon of the olive oil and salt.

3. Remove the garlic cloves from their skins. In a food processor, combine the tomatoes, peppers, garlic, toasted nuts and bread. Slowly drizzle in the remaining ¾ cup of olive oil until the mixture forms a smooth paste. Season with red wine vinegar, salt and pepper and set aside.

4. Make the steak: Season the steak with salt and pepper. Heat a cast-iron skillet set over medium-high heat. Once the pan is hot, add the 2 tablespoons of olive oil. Carefully add the skirt steak to the pan, being careful not to splash the hot oil out of the pan. Sear the steak on one side for 1 minute. Turn the steak over and sear for 1 additional minute. Add the butter, garlic and thyme to the pan and use a pastry brush to baste the steak for 2 to 3 minutes or until the steak is medium-rare. Remove the steak from the pan, cover with foil and set aside to rest for 2 to 3 minutes. Cut the steak across the grain into ½-inch slices and serve immediately with the romesco sauce.


Grilled Skirt Steak with Spicy Green Romesco

As you read this, we’re scrambling about, dropping off the animals, picking up last-minute compact flash cards, camera batteries and trying to remember where I stashed the international voltage converters. This afternoon we depart en vacances. We’re spending a couple of weeks connecting with old friends, exploring prehistoric cave painting, cycling, drinking, eating and playing Bananagrams on the terrace. I’m still uncertain about whether The Garum Factory will go dark or if I’ll rig some sort of wifi connection for the occasional splash of photos. In the meantime we leave you with a dish guaranteed to make you a back yard fire god, Grilled Skirt Steak with Spicy Green Romesco. Look at the photos: No complicated technique. If you can handle a food processor you’re already past the bouncer at the door. Believe me, you’ll be killer.

Regular readers know we’re big fans of Romesco,* a spicy Catalan condiment of roasted peppers thickened with nuts. At any given moment there’s a 50% chance a bowl of Romesco is sitting inside our refrigerator. Next to homemade mayo and garlic yogurt, it may be the most frequently made sauce in our kitchen. Puréed peppers, olive oil and nuts–how can you go wrong?

Traditional Romesco is made with red peppers. Andrew Hibert, Chef at TRADE (full disclosure: TRADE is one of Jody’s restaurants), thought to take a step I hadn’t seen before: he makes it with green peppers. And he makes it spicy. After tasting it I immediately said to Jody, “This has got to be a blog post!” At TRADE it’s served with briny roasted littleneck clams we’ve since paired it with skirt steak, then used the leftovers to add some zap to Copper River salmon–both were delicious.

Skirt steak is sometimes called the poor man’s flank steak, but as long as you take care to buy a piece that’s trimmed of sinew and not too fatty it’s pretty near as satisfying, and much much cheaper than flank. It’s great for stir-fry and grilling because it cooks so quickly. Both skirt and flank steak come from adjacent regions on the lower side of a cow, and both have great, meaty flavor, albeit skirt’s a bit chewier. In the flavor versus texture debate, I come down on the flavor side. While I understand why texture-fetishists may prefer filet mignon, to me there’s no comparison in the taste between skirt or flank and filet mignon. It’s so gratifying to actually chew your meat sometimes, as long as you don’t have to chew too long. Evidently I’m not alone. Skirt steak figures as the primary ingredient in many “authentic” Bolognese recipes. Something to keep in mind if you don’t just scarf leftover down cold, with a dab of spicy green Romesco.

The recipe calls for 1-2 serrano peppers 2 appear in the ingredients photograph. The heat of serranos varies–not as much as jalapenos, but enough to make us suggest you start with one, taste it raw, and then invite another, only if the first is milder than you expected. We unthinkingly threw 2 into our first batch and ended up with VERY spicy Romesco. This isn’t a macho contest–too much heat obscures the other flavors. Use 2 right off the bat at your own risk. Enjoy. See you in a few weeks. Ken


1. Make the romesco sauce: Preheat the oven to 300°. Season the tomatoes and peppers with 2 tablespoons of the olive oil, salt and pepper and place on a baking sheet. Slice the top of the head of garlic off, leaving the root intact. Season with salt, pepper and ½ tablespoon of olive oil. Wrap the garlic in foil and bake, along with the tomatoes and the peppers, until the garlic is soft, the tomatoes have begun to caramelize and the peppers are tender and beginning to blister, about 1 hour. Remove from the oven, cover the peppers with foil and set aside for 10 minutes, then peel the skin and remove the seeds and veins from the peppers.

2. In a small skillet set over medium heat, toast the almonds and hazelnuts with 1 teaspoon of the olive oil and salt.

3. Remove the garlic cloves from their skins. In a food processor, combine the tomatoes, peppers, garlic, toasted nuts and bread. Slowly drizzle in the remaining ¾ cup of olive oil until the mixture forms a smooth paste. Season with red wine vinegar, salt and pepper and set aside.

4. Make the steak: Season the steak with salt and pepper. Heat a cast-iron skillet set over medium-high heat. Once the pan is hot, add the 2 tablespoons of olive oil. Carefully add the skirt steak to the pan, being careful not to splash the hot oil out of the pan. Sear the steak on one side for 1 minute. Turn the steak over and sear for 1 additional minute. Add the butter, garlic and thyme to the pan and use a pastry brush to baste the steak for 2 to 3 minutes or until the steak is medium-rare. Remove the steak from the pan, cover with foil and set aside to rest for 2 to 3 minutes. Cut the steak across the grain into ½-inch slices and serve immediately with the romesco sauce.


My Cook Settings

Protein: 125˚F for 1 hour

Vegetable: 10 minutes

Starch: 30 minutes

For the romesco sauce, finely mince the roasted red pepper, garlic, shallot, and sliced almonds. Traditionally, romesco is a blended sauce, but if you prefer a chunkier texture you can mince the ingredients.

Combine the minced ingredients with the sherry vinegar, 1 tbsp olive oil, the smoked paprika, and salt and pepper to taste.

Once the ingredients are combined let the sauce sit until the steak is cooked. Giving the romesco time to sit will allow the vinegar to mellow out the stronger flavors of the garlic and shallot.

Once the asparagus is cooked, toss with ½ tbsp of olive oil and salt and pepper to taste. Return vegetable pan to Suvie for broiling.

To add a sear to the steaks, heat a skillet (preferably cast iron) over high heat. Add ½ tbsp olive oil and 1 tbsp of butter, swirl to coat. Once cooked, remove the steaks from the vacuum bags and season both sides with salt and pepper. Sear for 1-2 minutes per side and be sure to coat the steaks with the foaming butter. Move to a plate to rest.

Remove the potatoes from the pans and put in a heat-proof bowl. Mash with 2 tbsp of butter and season with salt and pepper to taste.

Slice the steak against the grain and serve with the asparagus and potatoes. Finally, top with the romesco sauce and enjoy!


Dinner Rush! Flank Steak with Romesco Sauce

I’ll never forget the first time I tried romesco sauce. When I was still a student in culinary school, the cuisines of the Mediterranean kitchen were always my jam. Foods from Spain, France, Italy, Turkey and the northern coast of Africa were a welcome hard left turn toward progress, inching ever farther from the canned pea dinners of my youth

Spanish Day was always my favorite. Assortments of tapas marched into place, shoulder to shoulder on a broad stainless steel table, ready for eatin’. The chef instructor in K8 (that was the classroom number) was particularly fond of tapas, so I was quickly schooled in the ways of romesco — a traditional Catalan sauce made with sweet roasted peppers, toasted nuts, sherry vinegar and garlic. Some people even put stale bread in the mix to thicken things up. It was like the most amazing almond and red pepper pesto I’d ever had.

Earlier this year I was working on a shoot with Marc Forgione — you know, the Iron Chef — and, as one does, he made romesco as part of a video on condiments. It was on this otherwise unassuming day, with one fell spoonful, that my romesco virginity was reclaimed and then shattered into a million delicious pieces. Lesson learned going forward: You’ve likely not really tried something until an Iron Chef makes it for you.

Marc’s approach, which inspired the recipe below, is to roast the nuts on the stovetop and then prepare the sauce while they’re still warm. He also does not skimp on nuts, which thicken the romesco to a texture that makes bread unnecessary.

I made quite a scene that day. No cracker, crisp or crudite was safe from a side swipe into the quart of sauce so sweet, savory, toasty and satisfying that I had to try it for the first time, twice.


For the Romesco Sauce:

  • 1 large or 2 medium green bell peppers
  • 1 small white onion – peeled, quartered
  • natural cooking spray
  • 1/4 C each sliced almonds or chopped, peeled hazelnuts – toasted
  • a small handful of mint leaves
  • about 1/3 C extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 large poblano pepper
  • 2 large tomatillos – husked, rinsed
  • 4 large cloves garlic – crushed
  • salt and pepper
  • 1 C combined flat-leaf parsley and cilantro
  • 2 tbsp sherry vinegar

For the Steak:

  • salt and pepper
  • 1 tsp ground coriander
  • 1 tbsp olive or vegetable oil
  • 1 1/2 lbs skirt steak
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp granulated garlic

Romesco Sauce | Serious Eats At Home

Romesco is a nutty and fruity Spanish sauce that is best when you make it your own. Our Culinary Director, Daniel Gritzer, shows you how he makes it at his home-including what peppers you should be using if you can’t find the traditional dried ñora peppers..
Full Story: https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2019/06/romesco-sauce-recipe.html.
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Daniel’s Kitchen Tour: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vK715ckM51g.
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Our Favorite Way to Cook Asparagus: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MDV8H….
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Peach Upside-Down Cake

Angie Mosier

Southern peaches are something special. The trouble is, you pretty much have to live in the South to understand what the fuss is about, because peaches bought elsewhere are most often picked green and hard before shipping. When ag-entrepreneur Stephen Rose moved to Nashville in the summer of 2010, he made a disheartening discovery: No one was selling fresh, flavorful peaches like the kind he'd grown up with in Peach County, Georgia. He had an idea. He and his wife bought a 1964 Jeep truck and started selling big, beautiful, juicy Georgia peaches out of their cab in Nashville. Within five weeks, the city had consumed over ten tons of their brown-bagged peaches. Now the Peach Truck Tour travels through Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, and Pennsylvania!

Pineapple upside-down cake is a Southern classic and is most often made with canned pineapple. This version uses fresh peaches and is a vast improvement, in my opinion. You can use all-purpose flour instead of the cake flour, but the results will be a bit heavier and slightly dense.

Ingredients

4 medium peaches (about 1½ pounds), unpeeled and cut into ⅓ -inch-thick wedges

1 cup cake flour, not self-rising

10 tablespoons (½ cup plus 2 tablespoons) unsalted butter, at room temperature

1 vanilla bean, split and seeds scraped

Bourbon Cream (recipe below)

Directions

  1. Heat oven to 350ºF. Line a rimmed baking sheet with a silicone baking mat or parchment paper. (This step helps with cleanup.)
  2. Toss the peaches with the lemon juice in a large bowl. In a separate bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, and baking soda.
  3. Cook ¼ cup of the granulated sugar over medium heat in a 10-inch cast-iron skillet, stirring occasionally with a wooden spoon, for 10 minutes, or until the sugar melts and turns a deep amber color. Remove from the heat. Immediately add 2 tablespoons of the butter and stir vigorously. Arrange the peach wedges in concentric circles over the sugar mixture, overlapping them as needed.
  4. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the remaining ¾ cup granulated sugar, ½ cup butter, and vanilla bean seeds on medium speed until smooth. Add the eggs, one at a time, beating until blended after each addition. Add the sour cream and beat until blended. With the mixer running on low speed, gradually add the flour mixture, beating just until blended and stopping to scrape bowl as needed. Spoon the batter over the peaches in the skillet and spread to cover. Place the skillet on the prepared baking sheet.
  5. Bake until golden brown and a wooden toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean, 40 to 45 minutes. Let cool in the skillet on a wire rack for 10 minutes. Run a knife around edge to loosen.
  6. Carefully pour out any excess liquid from the skillet into a measuring cup and set aside. (It's okay if you don't have any excess liquid&mdashit all depends on how juicy your fruit is.) Carefully invert the cake onto a serving plate and drizzle with any reserved liquid. Let cool slightly, about 10 minutes. Cut into wedges using a serrated knife. Top with bourbon cream and serve immediately.

Bourbon Cream

Ingredients

Directions

Combine the cream and bourbon in a large bowl. Refrigerate, along with a whisk, for at least 15 minutes. Once chilled, beat the cream with the chilled whisk until it holds soft peaks, 3 to 5 minutes.

These recipes are excerpted from "Secrets of the Southern Table" © 2018 by Virginia Willis. Photography © 2018 by Angie Mosier. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved.