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Mashed Potatoes, Pears and Leeks

Mashed Potatoes, Pears and Leeks


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Ingredients

  • 3 1/2 pounds Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
  • 2 pounds ripe pears, peeled, cored, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
  • 8 tablespoons (1 stick) pareve margarine, room temperature
  • 2 cups sliced leeks (white and pale green parts only; about 2 large)

Recipe Preparation

  • Brush 13x9x2-inch glass baking dish with margarine. Steam half of potatoes and pears until very tender, about 15 minutes. Transfer to large bowl; cover to keep warm. Repeat steaming with remaining potatoes and pears. Empty pot. Return all potatoes and pears to pot. Add 6 tablespoons margarine; mash mixture well. Season with salt and pepper.

  • Melt 2 tablespoons margarine in large skillet. Add leeks; sauté until crisp-tender, about 5 minutes. Mix half of leeks into potato mixture; transfer to prepared dish. Top with remaining leeks. DO AHEAD Can be made 1 day ahead. Cover; chill. Rewarm uncovered in 350°F oven 25 minutes.

Recipe by Selma Brown Morrow,Reviews Section

6 Recipes That Prove Smashed Is the New Mashed

Photo by: Matt Armendariz ©2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Matt Armendariz, 2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Silky mashed potatoes, pulverized peas and more smooth sides spell out pure comfort, and it's no wonder why these stick-to-your-ribs instances of mashed glory line our holiday tables year after year. Really anyone can eat them (we mean it, even babies can), but just because you can mash something to a different state of matter, doesn't mean you always should. Before obliterating your veggies beyond recognition, those who dig more texture in their food should exercise some restraint and adopt a chunkier approach: what we like to call the "smash." And we've got the most-smashing ways to do it right here.

Pounding and pureeing and ricing potatoes works when your side of mashed will hold a lake of gravy, but going the smashed route imparts the root veggie side with a whole lot more character. Rachael Ray doesn't get carried away with the mashing of her Cheesy Smashed Potatoes, which are loaded with cheddar, sour cream and chives for the ultimate year-round side.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 pound potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 1 leek, white parts only, quartered lengthwise and finely sliced
  • ½ teaspoon coarse salt
  • water to cover
  • ⅓ cup milk, warmed
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • salt to taste

Combine potatoes, leek, and salt in a multi-functional pressure cooker (such as Instant Pot®). Add water to cover, about 2 cups. Close and lock the lid. Select high pressure according to manufacturer's instructions set timer for 10 minutes. Allow about 10 minutes for pressure to build.

Release pressure using the natural-release method according to manufacturer's instructions, about 10 minutes. Carefully release remaining pressure using the quick-release method, about 5 minutes. Unlock and remove the lid. Drain potatoes well and return them to the pot.

Select Saute function. Toss potatoes until dried and starting to sizzle, about 3 minutes. Add butter stir until melted. Add milk. Mash potatoes with the back of a wooden spoon for a rustic mash, or run them through a ricer for a smoother mash. Taste and adjust the salt.


Pan-Seared Pork Chops with Pears and Potatoes

For the pears and potatoes: Peel the potatoes, rinse and cook in gently boiling salted water for about 20 minutes, until fork-tender.

Rinse the pears, cut into quarters, remove the seeds and then cut into wedges. Rinse the leek, trim and thinly slice. Melt the butter in a large saucepan, add the leeks and cook until softened. Deglaze with the apple juice and broth and then add the pears and chopped potatoes. Stir in the mustard, season with salt and pepper, partially cover and cook until the potatoes and pears begin to fall apart, about 10 minutes.

Rinse the pork chops, pat dry, season with salt and pepper and sear in the oil for 2-3 minutes per side, until golden brown. Reduce the heat to low and cook for 2-3 minutes, or until cooked to your liking.

Arrange the pork chops with the potatoes and pears on serving plates. Serve garnished with thyme.


When to add milk to hot liquids

When adding delicate dairy products like milk to a hot liquid, the timing is crucial. If the cooking liquid is boiling, the hot temperatures can cause the milk protein to curdle, creating a cottage cheese-like texture. To prevent this from happening the milk should be added at the end of cooking to finish the dish. Adding in a high fat cream also helps to stabilize the milk, in addition to providing richness.

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Pan-Seared Pork Chops with Pears and Potatoes

For the pears and potatoes: Peel the potatoes, rinse and cook in gently boiling salted water for about 20 minutes, until fork-tender.

Rinse the pears, cut into quarters, remove the seeds and then cut into wedges. Rinse the leek, trim and thinly slice. Melt the butter in a large saucepan, add the leeks and cook until softened. Deglaze with the apple juice and broth and then add the pears and chopped potatoes. Stir in the mustard, season with salt and pepper, partially cover and cook until the potatoes and pears begin to fall apart, about 10 minutes.

Rinse the pork chops, pat dry, season with salt and pepper and sear in the oil for 2-3 minutes per side, until golden brown. Reduce the heat to low and cook for 2-3 minutes, or until cooked to your liking.

Arrange the pork chops with the potatoes and pears on serving plates. Serve garnished with thyme.


Mashed Potatoes, Pears and Leeks - Recipes

This is one of my favorite side dishes. I have always loved soft, braised leeks, and they are plentiful right now in our Bay Area farmers markets. They are a perfect addition to mashed Yukon gold potatoes. This dish pairs well with beef, pork, vegetarian and poultry main dishes.

Ingredients
6 large or 9 medium Yukon gold potatoes, washed, peeled (or not) and cut into 1″ chunks
Water to cover
Sea salt
1 stick (4 oz.) butter, softened
1 1/2 cup half-n-half, heated

Braised leeks and mushrooms:
2 Tablespoons olive oil
2 medium-sized leeks, washed – root end and green tops cut off
6-8 medium Crimini mushrooms, cleaned and diced
1/2 cup water

You will also need:
Paring knife
Large pot with lid
Medium saucepan with lid
Potato masher or ricer
Spoon

Instructions
Place the potatoes into the large pot and cover them with water. Add about a tablespoon of salt to the water. Bring the water to a boil over high heat. As soon as the water starts to boil, cover the potatoes and turn the heat down to low. Let the potatoes cook until they are tender, about 15-20 minutes.

Meanwhile, saute the leeks and the mushrooms in olive oil for about two minutes over medium-high heat. Add the water and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low. Simmer, covered, for about 10 minutes until the leeks are tender.

Drain the potatoes. Add the butter, half of the milk and the braised leeks and mushrooms. Start mashing them together. Add additional milk, if needed, until you get a smooth consistency. Take care not to mash too much or the potatoes will become too starchy.


Colcannon (potatoes, cabbage, leeks and kale)

Another St. Patrick's Day has passed and this year I tried another new recipe.

St. Patrick's Day is special for us because it was my late brother-in-law's birthday. He passed away from a skiing accident a week before he turned 15. We always have a nice meal with friends and family and toast Jeremy on St. Patrick's Day. He would've been 35 this year. Our son Jeremy is named after him.

This year, dinner was Irish onion soup, corned beef, Yorkshire pudding and colcannon. Colcannon is a mashed-potato dish with cabbage, leeks and (sometimes) kale. I thought the leeks was also a neat nod to Meredith's grandmother who was born in Wales. I've never actually cooked with kale, so I thought it would be an interesting adventure.

I understand that kale can sometimes be bitter, however, I was hoping that cooking it really well in butter with salt and pepper would fix that, and it did.

From all of the recipes that I looked at to cobble this together, one in particular caught my attention in the method department so I borrowed from it. Just because of the quantities of vegetables, I split the frying into two batches, one for the kale, and one for the cabbage. I think it would've been messier if everything was in the pan at once.

The final result turned out great. I attribute the results to the butter, not-too-high fry temperature and the good company.


4 Delicious And Healthy Dishes To Cook This December

The best way to stay warm this December, is to start preparing these easy and delicious recipes.

Baked Eggs With Spinach, Mushrooms and Leeks

Ingredients:

  • 3 tbsp olive oil and one tablespoon for brushing
  • ½ chopped small onion
  • 2 cups Mushrooms (cremini)
  • ½ cups leeks
  • 6 cups baby spinach
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 6 slices crusty bread
  • 1 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 5 large eggs
  • ¾ cup whole milk
  • 1 cup gruyere cheese

Preparation:

Heat olive oil in a large pan over medium-high heat. Add in the onions and cook until they’re softened. Add in the mushrooms and leeks and cook until they are softened. Stir in the spinach and cook until it’s wilted. Remove the pan from heat and let it cool.

Arrange bread slices in a single layer in another pan. Put the mushroom mixture over the bread and then crack the eggs on top. Season everything with salt and pepper. Pour milk over top and sprinkle with some cheese. Bake until eggs are set, about 25-30 minutes.

Mashed Potato Casserole

Ingredients:

  • 2 kilos russet potatoes
  • 250gr. Cheddar cheese, divided
  • 1/2 cup butter (1 stick), plus more for greasing the baking dish
  • 250gr. sour cream
  • 250gr. bacon
  • 1 bunch chives, sliced

Preparation:

Peel the potatoes and cut them into cubes. Put the cubed potatoes in a large pot and add water. Boil the potatoes for 30-40 minutes, until they’re cooked through. Meanwhile: Grate the cheese, cut the bacon into slices and slice the chives. Cut the butter into cubes. Heat a pan over medium heat, add the bacon, and cook until it’s crispy. Once the potatoes are boiled, drain them and put them back in the pot. Add the cubed butter, sour cream, a tablespoon of salt and some freshly ground pepper. Mash everything. When the potatoes are mashed, add the chives and bacon and half of the grated cheese. Mix everything together. Grease a large baking dish and put the mashed mixture in the pan. Sprinkle cheese on top. Bake until the cheese is melted.

Moroccan Roasted Beets with Pomegranate

Ingredients:

  • 1.3 kilos peeled and chopped beets
  • ¾ tsp salt
  • Some pepper
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1tbsp balsamic
  • ½ tbsp cumin seeds or fennel seeds
  • ½ tbsp balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tbsp maple syrup
  • ½ cup pomegranate
  • ¼ cup crushed roasted pistachios
  • 1 tbsp orange zest

Preparation:

Put the beets, olive oil, balsamic vinegar, salt, pepper in a bowl to coat well, then put everything in a baking pan and roast until the beets softens. 45 minutes. To make the glaze, you need to mix the balsamic vinegar with the maple syrup in a small pot and put on medium heat for 20 minutes. When the beets are done, place them in a serving dish, add some balsamic glaze on top and some pomegranate seeds and pistachios. Garnish with orange zest.

Gingered Pears and Parsnips

Ingredients:

  • 2 quartered pears
  • 3 sliced parsnips
  • ½ cup white wine
  • ½ cup chicken broth
  • 2tbsp butter
  • Juice of one lemon
  • A few slices of ginger
  • 1 bay leaf
  • A pinch of sugar and red pepper flakes

Preparation:

In a large pan, add the pears, parsnips, the white wine and the chicken broth. Add the butter, the lemon juice a few slices of ginger, one bay leaf and a pinch of sugar and pepper flakes. Partially cover the pan and let everything boil. Cook until the pears turn brown.

Remember, it is very important to have healthy side dishes for your meal! See more: Good Grain Side Dishes


Leeks, celery root, Asian pears

We are so fortunate to be living in this bountiful area of the country, where there always seems to be wonderful things to eat in the farmers markets. I find that some of the produce I enjoy so much, other people rarely cook or eat. Standing at the stalls in the farmers markets I often get the question “What do you do with that?” Here are some answers.

I recently had some company over for dinner, and made what I think of as a very simple preparation of leeks in cream, and my guests that evening were almost licking their plates. It is sad to me that so few people cook this delicious, mild member of the allium family.

About the only tricky thing regarding preparing leeks is that they can be sandy, so the method for cleaning them is very important. What I like to do is to cut off the roots, and any excess green tops (I usually use about 4 to 6 inches of the green top part, depending on the size of the leeks themselves) and then split the leeks down the middle.

After that, cut them in 1/8-inch or so slices crosswise, and then put the slices into a big colander set in a bigger bowl of water. I actually use my lettuce spinner for this job, and it works perfectly, although I don’t need the spinning function. I wash them in at least two changes of water, swishing them around soundly, to make sure there is no more sand in the bottom of the bowl before draining them.

After that my two favorite ways to cook them are either in cream, or in olive oil. To make the leeks in cream, heat about one tablespoon of butter per big leek in a large pan. Add the washed and cut up leeks and stir until they begin to wilt. When the green color has brightened up and the leeks have softened, pour in some heavy cream, about two tablespoons per leek, and cook for another few minutes until tender. Season with salt and pepper and serve.

The second way, with olive oil, is to heat a bit of olive oil (not extra-virgin, which you should reserve for serving uncooked) in a big pan, add the cleaned and cut leeks and a bit of garlic, finely chopped. Stir and cook, seasoning with salt and pepper, until they are as tender as you like them to be. If they happen to get dry, add a splash or two of water.

Leeks are traditionally used in potato-leek soup, or vichyssoise, which is pureed and chilled potato-leek soup that is finished with some cream. They are also very nice in vegetable soup. You can also cook them until tender in beef or chicken broth with some fresh thyme, put them in a shallow casserole dish, and finish them with some good quality Parmesan cheese, dot them with a bit of butter, and put them under the broiler until they are speckled golden brown for a lovely gratin.

Celeriac, or celery root, is one of those vegetables that “gets no respect,” to quote a certain famous comedian. It is not the root of the common head of celery, but it is related. When I spoke to the farmer who had it on Tuesday, he told me it was the first of the season, and that he had just been waiting for it to get cold at night, as celeriac demands those kinds of conditions.

This is one of a family of vegetables commonly called root vegetables, and I think it is the tastiest of all of them. While it is indeed ugly to look at, don’t let that dissuade you. Buy ones that are heavy for their size, and not too big. Peel with a knife to remove the outside ugliness, and then proceed with your recipe.

The classic French dish, celery root remoulade, is indeed worthy of a try. In France celeriac remoulade is commonly purchased in delicatessens, like we buy potato salad, but in this country it is hardly known at all. You can look up recipes for this delicious dish, but be sure to do it ahead of time because you are eating it raw and the acid in the dressing helps to soften the celery root, making it more tender to eat.

My personal favorite way to eat celeriac is to simply peel it and cut it into about one-inch dice, toss it with just a bit of olive oil, season with salt and pepper, and roast it for about 30 to 35 minutes until deep golden brown. The roasting sweetens it up a lot, and tenderized it at the same time.

I even like this leftover as a cold antipasto dish. If you want to get fancy you can garnish it with some chopped Italian parsley or other herbs, and if you really like the taste of extra-virgin olive oil, you can drizzle a little extra over the dish at the point of service.

In addition to cooking celeriac as a stand-alone vegetable, you can put it in soups of almost any kind, from purees to vegetable soups to broth soups, or you can puree it with potatoes, in equal parts for a delicious spin on mashed potatoes with fewer carbs.

While this lovely fruit was a curious newcomer to our markets decades ago, I am still surprised today by how many people have not tried it, since it is so easy to eat, and so very delicious. This fruit is also known as a Chinese pear, a Korean pear, Japanese pear, sand pear, and a number of other names.

While the most common way to eat the pear-apple is out of hand or sliced like an apple, you can also cook with them. They can be used in a pear-apple cake, or you can use them in place of apples in a crisp. They are an important part of making a homemade sauce for kalbi-style Korean beef ribs.

You can cut them in thin slices and add them to a fall-themed salad with a few pomegranate pips and some persimmon. If you like fruit with your cheese plate, give the pear-apple a try.

The pear-apple only needs to be washed, and you can eat the whole thing, or you can peel them.


Watch the video: Easy Mashed Potatoes. Whole Food Plant Based (February 2023).