New recipes

The Food Almanac: September 13, 2012


In The Food Almanac, Tom Fitzmorris of the online newsletter, The New Orleans Menu, notes food facts and sayings.

Food Calendar
Today is National Peanut Day. Peanuts are a remarkable food, highly nourishing both to the eater and to the grower. [Mention George Washington Carver here.] They've suffered a dip in reputation in recent years, because of the 1 percent of Americans who have allergies to them. This number has doubled in recent years, likely because of the reverse placebo effect. Now we see advisories on candy bars and other products that say, "This product was manufactured in a plant that processes peanuts."

However, for most people peanuts offer nothing but pleasure. They're a better snack than a candy bar. Peanut butter is an essential product in most homes, especially those with kids. Peanut butter pie is a great dessert, if made with a light hand and some chocolate (recipe elsewhere in today's edition). And peanuts appear all over the menu, from Vietnamese peanut sauce for dipping spring rolls to peanut soup (a traditional dish in the Carolinas that seems ripe for exploitation here).

The best source of peanut information comes from the National Peanut Board, which offers hundreds of recipes, amusing trivia, and even facts about the allergy issue. And this: no trans-fats in peanuts!

Gourmet Gazetteer
Nut Creek is a small tributary of the Chattahoochee River, in west central Georgia, 62 miles southwest of Atlanta. It is well named: most of its four miles are flanked by pecan groves. You might be able to catch some fish at the spot where Nut Creek enters the Chattahoochee. If not, you're five miles west on Highway 34 from Lakeside Bar-B-Que in Franklin.

Annals of Chocolate
Milton Hershey, who founded the chocolate manufacturing company that made his name famous, was born today in 1857. He ignored the methods used by European chocolatiers and developed his own way of making milk chocolate. The Hershey process involved slightly soured milk. That flavor is widely disdained by many makers of chocolate, but it remains the standard for chocolate in the United States. Once his company was successful, Hershey pulled away from it, donating most of it to a charitable foundation. He spent the rest of his life traveling.

Edible Dictionary
Brazil nut, n. — A large nut produced by a very large tree (they can live for centuries and get to be more than 100 feet high) in the rainforests of central South America. The thin shell is dark brown, covering a wedge-shaped nut. They're so big that from pollination to harvest takes more than a year. Brazil nuts come not only from Brazil, but all the countries touching the Amazon basin. They contain more oils than almost any other nut — more, even than macadamias. The oils are the healthiest kind, and easy to extract — although Brazil nut oils get rancid quickly. We really ought to eat more of them. One reason we don't is an unfortunate nickname we ought to forget.

Annals of Table Etiquette
Miss Manners (real name Judith Martin) was born today in 1938. As she notes in her book, etiquette is more than knowing which fork to use — even though knowing which fork to use is what inspired etiquette as we know it. Louis XIV is often credited with making the first really big deal about table manners. Those who failed to practice them became outcasts.

Many rules of table etiquette have fallen from practice in this increasingly casual era. That doesn't make them any less worthwhile. Here are a few that are largely unknown, but which I think would add a great deal to dining pleasure:

1. Dessert, no matter what it is (even ice cream) should be served with a tablespoon (oval soup spoon) and a salad fork.

2. It's perfectly acceptable to pick up lamb chops, pork chops, and similar items with bones and nibble off them.

3. Asparagus can be picked up with the fingers and eaten, whether cold or hot. (Unless they're so saucy and limp that doing so might make a mess.)

4. Bread should be broken off the loaf at the table, not sliced. The piece you tear off should be enough to get you through the next course or so. Only butter one bite at a time, after tearing that off your piece.

5. The butter knife — that flat-bladed thing with the notch near the end of the blade — should be used only to transport butter from the common butter dish to your own bread and butter plate. The actual buttering is done with your table knife.

Or just forget about it all, do it your way, and miss out on the additional enjoyment that eating by the rules provides.

Music to Dine Elegantly By
Today in 1925 was the birthday of Mel Torme, one of the all-time great singers of the Great American Songbook. His nickname was "The Velvet Fog," which defined his sound exactly. But he didn't like it, as he told me during an engagement in the Blue Room in New Orleans about 30 years ago. All night long he gave the smokers in the grand old ballroom grief. Another terrific singer was born today in 1916. Dick Haymes was Frank Sinatra's replacement twice: with Harry James' and Tommy Dorsey's bands. Big, rich baritone, but not a lot of emotion.

Music to Eat Ice Cream By
Little Richard recorded Tutti Frutti, one of his most famous hits in his wild style, on this date in 1955. All-a-rooti!

Food Namesakes
American singer and songwriter Fiona Apple was born today in 1977... Dutch writer Nicholas Beets was uprooted today in 1814 . Relief pitcher Dan Quisenberry racked up his 39th save of the year, a record, today in 1983. I like a good quisenberry pie, don't you?... TV soap opera actor Jason Cook was born today in 1980... Actress Ann Dusenberry was born today in 1958. I like a good dusenberry pie, don't you?

Words to Eat By
"Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands — and then eat just one of the pieces." — Judith Viorst.

"I hate television. I hate it as much as peanuts. But I can't stop eating peanuts." — Orson Welles.

Words to Drink By
"I never drink coffee at lunch. I find it keeps me awake for the afternoon." — Ronald Reagan.


Instructions

  • Place herbs in a clean quart jar.
  • Heat vinegar just to the boiling point.
  • Pour heated vinegar over the herbs, filling the jar to the top.
  • Seal and store in a cool, dark place for at least three weeks for the fullest flavor. Strain the vinegar into 2 pint bottles and add a fresh sprig of the herb. (Use decorative bottles if you're planning to give these as gifts.)

You can use a single herb in plain white vinegar, or try a medley of herbs in other vinegars. Here are a few suggestions to get you started, but feel free to experiment and invent your own blends:

–white vinegar with tarragon leaves, basil leaves, and peeled shallots

–sherry vinegar with fresh rosemary leaves, minced horseradish, or chopped dried chilies


The Month of September 2020: Holidays, Fun Facts, Folklore

What happens in the month of September? It’s a little for everyone: the last days of summer and the first days of fall. See September holidays, advice, recipes, fun facts, and trivia below.

September, in Old England, was called Haervest-monath (Harvest Month). This is the time to gather up the rest of the harvest and prepare for the winter months.

There are flowers enough in the summertime,
More flowers than I can remember—
But none with the purple, gold, and red
That dye the flowers of September!

—Mary Howitt (1799-1888)

The Month of September

September’s name comes from the Latin word septem, meaning “seven.” This month had originally been the seventh month of the early Roman calendar.

Notable Dates in September

  • September 7—the first Monday in September—is Labor Day. Canadians also observe Labour Day.
  • September 11 is Patriot Day, held in honor and remembrance of those who died in the September 11 attacks of 2001.
  • September 13 is Grandparents Day. Honor your grandparents today—and every day!
  • September 17 is Constitution Day. This day celebrates the adoption of the U.S. Constitution, which occurred on September 17, 1787 (just five years prior to the founding of The Old Farmer’s Almanac, believe it or not!).
  • September 18 brings the start of Rosh Hashanah, at sundown.
  • September 21 is recognized as the annual International Day of Peace. Observances range from a moment of silence at noon to events such as peace walks, concerts, and volunteering in the community.
  • September 22 marks the start of fall! This year’s Autumnal Equinox falls on September 22 at 9:31 A.M. EDT . At this time, there are approximately equal hours of daylight and darkness.
  • September 27 is Yom Kippur, the holiest holiday in the Jewish calendar.
  • September 29 is Michaelmas. Michaelmas is an ancient Celtic “Quarter Day” which marked the end of the harvesting season and was steeped in folklore.

“Just for Fun” Days

Have fun with these strange celebrations in September!

  • September is National Happy Cat Month
  • September 8: National Hug Your Hound Day
  • September 13: Kids Take Over the Kitchen Day
  • September 19: International Talk Like a Pirate Day
  • September 24: National Punctuation Day

September Zodiac

September’s zodiac signs are Virgo (Aug. 23–Sept. 22) and Libra (Sept. 23–Oct. 22). Find out your zodiac profile!

See the Best Days to do things this month.

September Astronomy

Full Corn Moon

September’s full moon, the Full Corn Moon, reaches peak illumination on Wednesday, September 2, at 1:23 a.m. EDT . For the best view of the full Moon, look skyward on the night of the 1st! Read more about September’s Full Moon.

Moon Phases for September

Full Moon: Sept. 2, at 1:23 a.m. EDT
Last Quarter: Sept. 10, at 5:26 a.m. EDT
New Moon: Sept. 17, at 7:00 a.m. EDT
First Quarter: Sept. 23, at 9:55 p.m. EDT
See more about Moon Phases.

Check out our Sky Watch for the month’s best night sky events.

Recipes for the Season

We like to think of September as the month of apples, as apple-picking becomes a common weekend pastime. Here are a few recipes for this fruit of the season:

Wondering which kind of apples to use in your dish? See the Best Apples for Baking: Apple Pie, Applesauce, Cider & More to find out!

For more fall recipes, use our Recipe Search.

September Gardening

The garden may be winding down, but there’s still plenty left to do!

  • Correct any soil deficiencies you’ve noticed healthy soil is crucial to healthy plants. See more on soil amendments and fixes.
  • Compost should be watered during dry periods so that it remains active. Learn more about composting.
  • Onions are nearly ripe when the tips of the leaves turn yellow. See our onion page for harvesting tips.
  • Fall is the time to plant garlic. Got your cloves ready? Read more about planting garlic.
  • Sunflower seeds are best dried while still in the plant. See more about how to harvest sunflower seeds.
  • If you’re running out of ideas on where to store your crops, try using a root cellar.

Everyday Advice

If you’re planning on baking some apple pies, try consulting our Best Apples for Baking article.

Do you still have herbs left over? If so, use them to make your own herbal remedies.

Try this fun fall craft using apples: Apple Heads.

Help out the birds this coming winter by preparing some bird food for them.

Folklore for the Season

  • Heavy September rains bring drought.
  • September dries up ditches or breaks down bridges.
  • September blow soft, till the fruit’s in the loft.
  • Married in September’s golden glow, smooth and serene your life will go.
  • If the storms of September clear off warm, the storms of the following winter will be warm.
  • Fair on September 1st, fair for the month.

September Birth Flowers

September’s birth flowers are the aster and the morning glory. The aster signifies powerful love, and the China aster expresses variety or afterthought in the language of flowers. The morning glory symbolizes affection. It can also mean coquetry, affectation, or bonds in the language of flowers. Find out more about September’s birth flowers and the language of flowers.

September Birthstone

The September birthstone is the sapphire, which was once thought to guard against evil and poisoning.

  • Sapphire is a form of corundum that is typically blue, a color caused by tiny bits of iron and titanium the vivid, medium blues are more valuable than lighter or darker forms. Due to various trace elements, sapphires also appear in other colors. Those with red colors are called rubies.
  • Sapphires were thought to encourage divine wisdom and protection. They symbolized purity, truth, trust, and loyalty. Some believed that if they were placed in a jar with a snake, the snake would die.
  • The sapphire, along with the related ruby, are the second-hardest natural gemstones, with only the diamond being harder.

This Month in History

September 12: Choices

On this day in 1962, President John F. Kennedy went to Rice University in Houston, Texas, to make a speech justifying his proposed $5.4 billion space program. He had called on Congress in the previous year to fund a massive project to put a man on the Moon and bring him home safely before the end of the decade. Toward that end, he asked his vice president, Lyndon Johnson, to make it happen. Johnson, a Texan, was happy to oblige.

The plan was to establish a Manned Spacecraft Center in Houston, upon land that had been made available by Rice University (which had received it from Humble Oil and Refining Company). If that happened, federal money would flow to that city and to Rice, a university distinguished for its scholarship, if not for its football. In football, the University of Texas was king, although Rice gamely played Texas every year.

Kennedy challenged 35,000 listeners, sweltering in the Rice football stadium, to think big: “But why, some say, the Moon? Why choose this as our goal? And they may well ask, Why climb the highest mountain? Why, 35 years ago, fly the Atlantic?” he asked. Then he added another impossible goal, one he had jotted in the margin only minutes earlier: “Why does Rice play Texas?”

The line drew a huge laugh and added a touch of humor and humility to the soaring rhetoric. His speech continued, soon issuing the now famous lines, “We choose to go to the Moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard … .”

Kennedy eventually got his moonshot, although he did not live to see Neil Armstrong’s 1969 moonwalk. And, three years after the speech, in 1965, Rice beat Texas. It would be 28 years before that happened again.


Customer reviews

Top reviews from the United States

There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

The Old Farmer's Almanac has been used by the gardeners in my family for over 50 years. I grew up watching my Grandfathers read it and when I read it it is like an old friend giving me advice. I think they've backed off a bit on the weather prediction (which was always great fun if not always accurate) but the information in there is the backbone of a garden worked by the seasons/weather. The articles are always fun and informative. It's just one of those books that seems to go with a healthy backyard garden.

I just wish they hadn't sold the 2012 edition at the end of 2012 because I accidently got THAT one instead of the 2013 one! Oops.

Love the Old Farmer's Almanac. No other almanac will do. I usually pick one up at the grocery store after christmas, but this year I could only find other brand's of the almanac. So, i had intended to make a trip to other stores on the weekend to find one, and then I thought. Oh yeah, i can order it from amazon (!)

I have to say, i'm loving my new Amazon Prime membership and its free 2-day shipping. Now instead of running around town on my days off to pick up items I just place an order and find the item on my doorstep a couple days later.


Battalia Pie.

If it was Lumber pie yesterday, it must be Battalia Pie today, surely? A Battalia Pie is (or, rather – was) a pie filled with beatilles, or ‘small blessed objects.’

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the word beatilles originally applied to small pieces of needlework embroidered (by nuns in convents, of course) with images of sacred subjects. At some point in time (the seventeenth century?), it came to refer to pies filled with such small blessed ingredients as ‘Cocks-combs, Goose-gibbets, Ghizzards, Livers, and other Appurtenances of Fowls’ (1706.)

It seems that pie-bakers and pie-consumers in the English-speaking world did not have a thorough knowledge of the Latin language however, and the process of folk etymology came into play. The word beatilles as it was spoken by pie enthusiasts became confused with the similar words with military references – and beatilles became battalia. It was a logical next step in the evolution of Battalia Pies that sometimes they were constructed in the shape of castles or other fortifications.
I give you a wonderful version of Battalia Pie from John Nott’s The Cooks and Confectioners Dictionary: or, the Accomplish’d Housewife’s Companion (1723.) This is a fish pie of complex construction, complete with towers and battlements, and the small blessed objects include a variety of fish heads.


An Apple by Another Name.

4 comments:

I had been under the impression that the English for Reinette was Pippin (as in Cox's Orange Pippin) but the only internet evidence I can find is the translation of a French children's song at http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=1250&c=22

My mom used to serve fried apples seasoned with cinnamon and sugar as a breakfast item. She used margarine instead of butter unfortunately but they were still delicious. I imagine it would be much better with butter. Try them if you haven't. She let them fry until the sugar were caramelized and the slices were a golden brown color.

Perhaps not apropos of rennet. I merely want to say that I just discovered this blog, and it's fascinating: scholarly, beautifully written and diverse. I've only gotten as far back as April of this year! I hope beyond measure that you're planning a book.

PS I'm only posting anonymously because I despise Google+.

Hi Liz, Les, and Kate - sorry for the late and combined response, the week(s) kinda got away from me.
I think there is so much confusion over common apple names that only a horticulturalist could work them out - and then perhaps not.
Les, I Love the sound of the fried apples am definitely going to try them for breakfast at the weekend.
Kate - I am delighted to have you on board the good ship Old Foodie. I am currently writing a food history almanac.


NEWSLETTER

UNSUBSCRIBE ANYTIME

Get Cappers Farmer Delivered Directly To Your Inbox

Caleb Reganand his wife, Gwen, live in rural Douglas County, Kansas, where they enjoy hunting, fishing, and raising and growing as much of their own food as they can. Caleb can&rsquot imagine a better scenario than getting to work on a rural lifestyle magazine as a profession, and then living that same lifestyle right in the heartland of America. Connect with him on Google+.


Get a gig: An aspiring musician’s guide to local venues

Live music is as vital to the Hudson Valley today as it has ever been. But for local musicians, getting in on the bill can feel like a daunting experience. [email protected] reached out to a wide range of music hotspots to get all the info that you’ll need to decide whether a venue is right for your band, how best to present yourself and whom to reach out to have your chance at hitting the stage.

Rosendale Café
434 Main Street
PO Box 436
Rosendale, NY 12472
(845) 658-9048
https://rosendalecafe.com

The Rosendale Café is in the thick of one of Ulster County’s most vivid musical scenes. It not only hosts music on weekends, but also runs a biweekly singer/songwriter series on Tuesday nights. When considering musical acts for the space, co-owner Mark Morganstern said that it comes down to three simple words: “quality, authenticity, variety.” That vibe also comes across in the space itself.

“Musically speaking – and sort of the way we do the food, too – it’s very hands-on, user-friendly.,” Morganstern said. “You’re sitting a few feet away from a national or international artist, hearing them do what they do.”

The popular singer/songwriter night is run by John Hughes, who performs with Dog on Fleas. “People who want to sign up to play will send an e-mail, and they’ll automatically be added to it. They’ll get 15 minutes to play their sound will get mixed and they’ll get an appreciative audience.”

For booking inquiries, visit https://rosendalecafe.com and fill out the form on the contact page.

While Poughkeepsie’s Bull and Buddha has established itself as an Asian fusion dining destination, its club space, Orient, is also popular with enthusiasts of deejay culture and live music. Chris Sikora, general manager, said that the music is primarily heard on Friday and Saturday nights, and will often go as late in the evening as people want to hear it. The music is mostly Top 40, remixes and mash-ups. “We don’t really do the house music anymore,” Sikora said. “It got a little too big in the area, and we jumped ship on the trend.”

On Fridays, Orient hosts DJ Mr. Vince and DJ Kue, and on Saturdays Parag and Ryder. “We have our deejays on contract,” Sikora said. “We’re pretty set on talent for the near term.”

Still, that doesn’t mean the place isn’t open to new voices. “We have people drop off mix tapes, samples and demos of what they do,” Sikora said. “We keep our ears to the ground. People are always welcome to send in music.”

Sikora said that he believes that they’ll likely bring Thursday jazz back this fall, and Backyard at Bull and Buddha will also continue featuring occasional live music in a setting like “a Brooklyn-style backyard party.”

As if serving delicious food at Wok ‘n’ Roll wasn’t enough, Harmony Music, a live music venue also owned and operated by Shawu, extends the good vibes even further.

According to its Facebook page, Harmony Music is “a place for real music and real people in the heart of Woodstock,” generally operating on the pass-the-hat principle.

The music is eclectic, and is ordinarily booked by Shawu. “If I like it, I book it,” Shawu said, adding that the atmosphere that he is trying to create with Harmony Music is one of inclusion. “Music is for the world. Music is a wonderful thing.”

BSP Lounge
323 Wall Street
Kingston, NY 12401
(845) 481-5158
https://bsplounge.com

The arts scene in Uptown Kingston is more vital than ever, and thanks to the BSP (Backstage Studio Productions) Lounge and the seemingly tireless energies of Michael Amari and Trevor Dunworth, it has an unofficial nerve center. With local art adorning the walls and live music generally featured on Wednesdays through Saturdays, it’s likely that there’s something for everyone at the BSP Lounge. And that’s exactly how Dunworth, BSP’s manager, wants it. “We’re trying to create multiple atmospheres,” Dunworth said. “I’m trying to appeal to all kinds of people.”

The BSP Lounge has a booking form on its website for interested artists, and the calendar is set with careful consideration. “We book communally,” Dunworth said. “We sit down twice a week and look at all the different bands who want to play here. We also look at other stuff that’s going on in the area and pick the best fit. It spans all genres.”

Woodstock’s Colony Café has become one of the most popular local live music venues over the past decade, largely because co-owner Mariann Harrigfeld has tried to treat the space as though it belongs to the area. “It’s really just another community center in my eyes,” Harrigfeld said. “That’s how we run it. We’re a venue, so we do weddings and birthday parties – all different types of community-based events. We’re not a bar or a restaurant per se. We’re a venue, and that’s how I operate it.”

Originally built in 1929, the building was closed for 40 years before Harrigfeld’s family bought it in 2000, taking a year to understand building codes “in order to have it reopen exactly as it closed.” “Musicians started calling, and for 12 years I’ve just let it create itself,” Harrigfeld said.

Bacchus Restaurant
4 South Chestnut Street
New Paltz, NY 12561
(845) 255-8636
www.bacchusnewpaltz.com

Dionysus, the Greek god of wine, madness and wanton celebration, was renamed Bacchus by the Romans, and many centuries later that name was also used by one of New Paltz’s most popular restaurants, bars and live-music venues. It’s fitting in the spirit of celebration that the music most often heard at Bacchus is lively and upbeat.

“We generally book bands that are dance-type bands,” said Dave Ellison, manager of Bacchus. “Usually the music starts here at 10 at night and goes to 1 or 3 in the morning, so it can’t really be slower stuff. It’s always full bands we don’t usually do acoustic.”

Bacchus tends to tap into the fertile local music scene when it books bands. “It’s probably 90 percent local,” Ellison said. “New Paltz has a decent-sized Music Department at the college. For a town this size, there’s probably 30 bands.”

Ellison said that Bacchus is looking to book a wide range of music: “reggae, electronic – whatever gets people dancing.” Interested artists should e-mail an electronic press kit to [email protected]

Unison Arts & Learning Center
68 Mountain Rest Road
New Paltz, NY 12561
(845) 255-1559
www.unisonarts.org

Combining live music, arts and education, the Unison Arts & Learning Center in New Paltz is a unique venue in all of the Hudson Valley. In the grand tradition of the ‘60s folk scene so deeply rooted in the region, Unison features music that evokes the warmth and intimacy of classic café performance.

“We do have certain genres that we present more than others,” said Slade Plantinga of Unison. “We probably do more along the line of folk, singer/songwriters. But we also do other things.” With local bluesman Connor Kennedy on its roster as well as an evening of klezmer music, it’s clear that Unison can’t entirely be pinned down. But still, there’s that warmth and intimacy in just about everything that it does.

“We are not a restaurant or a bar,” Plantinga said. “We do have coffee and tea and cookies, but it’s more of an acoustic crowd. We don’t really need a lot of amplification in the space. It’s less like a nightclub than it is sitting in someone’s living room.”

Artists interested in performing at Unison should send music and press materials to [email protected]

Bearsville Theater
291 Tinker Street
Woodstock, NY 12498
(845) 679-4406
www.bearsvilletheater.com

Blending international artists with some of the area’s best local acts, the Bearsville Theater is one of the Hudson Valley’s best-known venues for live music. In fact, the building’s pedigree is a piece of rock ‘n’ roll history itself.

Legendary manager of Bob Dylan and others “Albert Grossman designed it and had it built,” said Jodie Sleed, the Bearsville Theater’s office manager and marketing director. “It was his vision, and I think it retains a lot of that. It’s unique that the building itself has a rock ‘n’ roll history.”

Sleed said that the venue primarily looks at artists who perform “original music,” which certainly includes local acts. Interested parties should reach out to venue manager Robert Frazza, or through the contact form on the Bearsville Theater website.


Get a gig: An aspiring musician’s guide to local venues

Live music is as vital to the Hudson Valley today as it has ever been. But for local musicians, getting in on the bill can feel like a daunting experience. [email protected] reached out to a wide range of music hotspots to get all the info that you’ll need to decide whether a venue is right for your band, how best to present yourself and whom to reach out to have your chance at hitting the stage.

Rosendale Café
434 Main Street
PO Box 436
Rosendale, NY 12472
(845) 658-9048
https://rosendalecafe.com

The Rosendale Café is in the thick of one of Ulster County’s most vivid musical scenes. It not only hosts music on weekends, but also runs a biweekly singer/songwriter series on Tuesday nights. When considering musical acts for the space, co-owner Mark Morganstern said that it comes down to three simple words: “quality, authenticity, variety.” That vibe also comes across in the space itself.

“Musically speaking – and sort of the way we do the food, too – it’s very hands-on, user-friendly.,” Morganstern said. “You’re sitting a few feet away from a national or international artist, hearing them do what they do.”

The popular singer/songwriter night is run by John Hughes, who performs with Dog on Fleas. “People who want to sign up to play will send an e-mail, and they’ll automatically be added to it. They’ll get 15 minutes to play their sound will get mixed and they’ll get an appreciative audience.”

For booking inquiries, visit https://rosendalecafe.com and fill out the form on the contact page.

While Poughkeepsie’s Bull and Buddha has established itself as an Asian fusion dining destination, its club space, Orient, is also popular with enthusiasts of deejay culture and live music. Chris Sikora, general manager, said that the music is primarily heard on Friday and Saturday nights, and will often go as late in the evening as people want to hear it. The music is mostly Top 40, remixes and mash-ups. “We don’t really do the house music anymore,” Sikora said. “It got a little too big in the area, and we jumped ship on the trend.”

On Fridays, Orient hosts DJ Mr. Vince and DJ Kue, and on Saturdays Parag and Ryder. “We have our deejays on contract,” Sikora said. “We’re pretty set on talent for the near term.”

Still, that doesn’t mean the place isn’t open to new voices. “We have people drop off mix tapes, samples and demos of what they do,” Sikora said. “We keep our ears to the ground. People are always welcome to send in music.”

Sikora said that he believes that they’ll likely bring Thursday jazz back this fall, and Backyard at Bull and Buddha will also continue featuring occasional live music in a setting like “a Brooklyn-style backyard party.”

As if serving delicious food at Wok ‘n’ Roll wasn’t enough, Harmony Music, a live music venue also owned and operated by Shawu, extends the good vibes even further.

According to its Facebook page, Harmony Music is “a place for real music and real people in the heart of Woodstock,” generally operating on the pass-the-hat principle.

The music is eclectic, and is ordinarily booked by Shawu. “If I like it, I book it,” Shawu said, adding that the atmosphere that he is trying to create with Harmony Music is one of inclusion. “Music is for the world. Music is a wonderful thing.”

BSP Lounge
323 Wall Street
Kingston, NY 12401
(845) 481-5158
https://bsplounge.com

The arts scene in Uptown Kingston is more vital than ever, and thanks to the BSP (Backstage Studio Productions) Lounge and the seemingly tireless energies of Michael Amari and Trevor Dunworth, it has an unofficial nerve center. With local art adorning the walls and live music generally featured on Wednesdays through Saturdays, it’s likely that there’s something for everyone at the BSP Lounge. And that’s exactly how Dunworth, BSP’s manager, wants it. “We’re trying to create multiple atmospheres,” Dunworth said. “I’m trying to appeal to all kinds of people.”

The BSP Lounge has a booking form on its website for interested artists, and the calendar is set with careful consideration. “We book communally,” Dunworth said. “We sit down twice a week and look at all the different bands who want to play here. We also look at other stuff that’s going on in the area and pick the best fit. It spans all genres.”

Woodstock’s Colony Café has become one of the most popular local live music venues over the past decade, largely because co-owner Mariann Harrigfeld has tried to treat the space as though it belongs to the area. “It’s really just another community center in my eyes,” Harrigfeld said. “That’s how we run it. We’re a venue, so we do weddings and birthday parties – all different types of community-based events. We’re not a bar or a restaurant per se. We’re a venue, and that’s how I operate it.”

Originally built in 1929, the building was closed for 40 years before Harrigfeld’s family bought it in 2000, taking a year to understand building codes “in order to have it reopen exactly as it closed.” “Musicians started calling, and for 12 years I’ve just let it create itself,” Harrigfeld said.

Bacchus Restaurant
4 South Chestnut Street
New Paltz, NY 12561
(845) 255-8636
www.bacchusnewpaltz.com

Dionysus, the Greek god of wine, madness and wanton celebration, was renamed Bacchus by the Romans, and many centuries later that name was also used by one of New Paltz’s most popular restaurants, bars and live-music venues. It’s fitting in the spirit of celebration that the music most often heard at Bacchus is lively and upbeat.

“We generally book bands that are dance-type bands,” said Dave Ellison, manager of Bacchus. “Usually the music starts here at 10 at night and goes to 1 or 3 in the morning, so it can’t really be slower stuff. It’s always full bands we don’t usually do acoustic.”

Bacchus tends to tap into the fertile local music scene when it books bands. “It’s probably 90 percent local,” Ellison said. “New Paltz has a decent-sized Music Department at the college. For a town this size, there’s probably 30 bands.”

Ellison said that Bacchus is looking to book a wide range of music: “reggae, electronic – whatever gets people dancing.” Interested artists should e-mail an electronic press kit to [email protected]

Unison Arts & Learning Center
68 Mountain Rest Road
New Paltz, NY 12561
(845) 255-1559
www.unisonarts.org

Combining live music, arts and education, the Unison Arts & Learning Center in New Paltz is a unique venue in all of the Hudson Valley. In the grand tradition of the ‘60s folk scene so deeply rooted in the region, Unison features music that evokes the warmth and intimacy of classic café performance.

“We do have certain genres that we present more than others,” said Slade Plantinga of Unison. “We probably do more along the line of folk, singer/songwriters. But we also do other things.” With local bluesman Connor Kennedy on its roster as well as an evening of klezmer music, it’s clear that Unison can’t entirely be pinned down. But still, there’s that warmth and intimacy in just about everything that it does.

“We are not a restaurant or a bar,” Plantinga said. “We do have coffee and tea and cookies, but it’s more of an acoustic crowd. We don’t really need a lot of amplification in the space. It’s less like a nightclub than it is sitting in someone’s living room.”

Artists interested in performing at Unison should send music and press materials to [email protected]

Bearsville Theater
291 Tinker Street
Woodstock, NY 12498
(845) 679-4406
www.bearsvilletheater.com

Blending international artists with some of the area’s best local acts, the Bearsville Theater is one of the Hudson Valley’s best-known venues for live music. In fact, the building’s pedigree is a piece of rock ‘n’ roll history itself.

Legendary manager of Bob Dylan and others “Albert Grossman designed it and had it built,” said Jodie Sleed, the Bearsville Theater’s office manager and marketing director. “It was his vision, and I think it retains a lot of that. It’s unique that the building itself has a rock ‘n’ roll history.”

Sleed said that the venue primarily looks at artists who perform “original music,” which certainly includes local acts. Interested parties should reach out to venue manager Robert Frazza, or through the contact form on the Bearsville Theater website.


The Food Almanac: September 13, 2012 - Recipes

The University of Pennsylvania Police Department
Community Crime Report

About the Crime Report: Below are all Crimes Against Persons, Property and Crimes Against Society from the campus report for August 27-September 2, 2012. View prior weeks' reports. &mdashEd.

This summary is prepared by the Division of Public Safety and includes all criminal incidents reported and made known to the University Police Department between the dates of August 27-September 2, 2012. The University Police actively patrol from Market Street to Baltimore Avenue and from the Schuylkill River to 43rd Street in conjunction with the Philadelphia Police. In this effort to provide you with a thorough and accurate report on public safety concerns, we hope that your increased awareness will lessen the opportunity for crime. For any concerns or suggestions regarding this report, please call the Division of Public Safety at (215) 898-4482.


Watch the video: Almanac North - May 13, 2016 (November 2021).