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Vegetable Desserts We Wish Had Never Been Invented


We want our brownies to be filled with chocolate, not kale

We prefer our cake to be made of chocolate, not spinach.

Don’t get me wrong: I’m all for eating my way through a loaf of chocolate-chip zucchini bread, a slice of pumpkin pie, or a cream cheese frosted carrot cake, but the health-obsessives out there seem to have taken the vegetable-in-dessert recipes to a rather unappetizing extreme. Our favorite vegetable sweet treats are being tainted by the creation of kale brownies and parsnip pie. We really wish we’d never heard of, laid eyes on, or tasted these vegetable-heavy desserts. We’d rather skip the sweet treats entirely than force ourselves to eat these “healthy” versions.

Cauliflower Rice Pudding

In the low-carb craze, where calorie-counting dieters are making pizza bases out of grated cauliflower, they are also swapping the rice in rice pudding for shredded cauliflower. It’s a nice thought, but it doesn’t taste anything nearly as delicious as the carbohydrate- and sugar-rich rice original.

Kale Brownies

I’m a big fan of a carefully created kale salad, but I want my brownies to be filled with chocolate, butter, and eggs – not leafy, vitamin- and mineral-filled, iron-rich green leaves.

Spinach Cake With Cream Cheese Frosting

A green layer cake really doesn’t look appealing. Maybe if it was made with matcha we could stomach it, but when we learn that the green comes from fresh spinach leaves, we know for certain that this cake is not something we need in our lives.


Science & Food: 20 Awesome Dishes Made With Molecular Gastronomy

This mad scientist method of preparing food is essentially the Willy Wonka factory of the savory food world.

Molecular gastronomy can be described in a myriad of different ways, but the simplest is to say that the resulting dish is what happens when science meets edible ingredients. This subcategory is actually that of food science rather than of cuisine which is why many people don't necessarily understand it. It describes the process used to create food that has been manipulated via its molecular composition, in order to alter its form, flavor, or texture. The reason so many confuse the process with a food category is because molecular gastronomy has grown in popularity and is seen on many menus, not just those of Michelin star-rated establishments.

To read this and think that molecular gastronomy is simply just another way of cooking is to underestimate its ability to create an experience. Grant Achatz, the owner of Alinea in Chicago, founded his entire career on this practice and is considered one of the first to introduce it to the general public. There, he and his staff are able to create a food experience that's interactive, wildly limitless, and undoubtedly mystifying. You'll see things such as fruit foam, vegetable powder, gelatin cubes that taste like an entire entree. This mad scientist method of preparing food is essentially the Willy Wonka factory of the savory food world. We've compiled 20 photos that showcase all the best and most brilliant aspects of this amazing food science to inspire you before your next meal.


Science & Food: 20 Awesome Dishes Made With Molecular Gastronomy

This mad scientist method of preparing food is essentially the Willy Wonka factory of the savory food world.

Molecular gastronomy can be described in a myriad of different ways, but the simplest is to say that the resulting dish is what happens when science meets edible ingredients. This subcategory is actually that of food science rather than of cuisine which is why many people don't necessarily understand it. It describes the process used to create food that has been manipulated via its molecular composition, in order to alter its form, flavor, or texture. The reason so many confuse the process with a food category is because molecular gastronomy has grown in popularity and is seen on many menus, not just those of Michelin star-rated establishments.

To read this and think that molecular gastronomy is simply just another way of cooking is to underestimate its ability to create an experience. Grant Achatz, the owner of Alinea in Chicago, founded his entire career on this practice and is considered one of the first to introduce it to the general public. There, he and his staff are able to create a food experience that's interactive, wildly limitless, and undoubtedly mystifying. You'll see things such as fruit foam, vegetable powder, gelatin cubes that taste like an entire entree. This mad scientist method of preparing food is essentially the Willy Wonka factory of the savory food world. We've compiled 20 photos that showcase all the best and most brilliant aspects of this amazing food science to inspire you before your next meal.


Science & Food: 20 Awesome Dishes Made With Molecular Gastronomy

This mad scientist method of preparing food is essentially the Willy Wonka factory of the savory food world.

Molecular gastronomy can be described in a myriad of different ways, but the simplest is to say that the resulting dish is what happens when science meets edible ingredients. This subcategory is actually that of food science rather than of cuisine which is why many people don't necessarily understand it. It describes the process used to create food that has been manipulated via its molecular composition, in order to alter its form, flavor, or texture. The reason so many confuse the process with a food category is because molecular gastronomy has grown in popularity and is seen on many menus, not just those of Michelin star-rated establishments.

To read this and think that molecular gastronomy is simply just another way of cooking is to underestimate its ability to create an experience. Grant Achatz, the owner of Alinea in Chicago, founded his entire career on this practice and is considered one of the first to introduce it to the general public. There, he and his staff are able to create a food experience that's interactive, wildly limitless, and undoubtedly mystifying. You'll see things such as fruit foam, vegetable powder, gelatin cubes that taste like an entire entree. This mad scientist method of preparing food is essentially the Willy Wonka factory of the savory food world. We've compiled 20 photos that showcase all the best and most brilliant aspects of this amazing food science to inspire you before your next meal.


Science & Food: 20 Awesome Dishes Made With Molecular Gastronomy

This mad scientist method of preparing food is essentially the Willy Wonka factory of the savory food world.

Molecular gastronomy can be described in a myriad of different ways, but the simplest is to say that the resulting dish is what happens when science meets edible ingredients. This subcategory is actually that of food science rather than of cuisine which is why many people don't necessarily understand it. It describes the process used to create food that has been manipulated via its molecular composition, in order to alter its form, flavor, or texture. The reason so many confuse the process with a food category is because molecular gastronomy has grown in popularity and is seen on many menus, not just those of Michelin star-rated establishments.

To read this and think that molecular gastronomy is simply just another way of cooking is to underestimate its ability to create an experience. Grant Achatz, the owner of Alinea in Chicago, founded his entire career on this practice and is considered one of the first to introduce it to the general public. There, he and his staff are able to create a food experience that's interactive, wildly limitless, and undoubtedly mystifying. You'll see things such as fruit foam, vegetable powder, gelatin cubes that taste like an entire entree. This mad scientist method of preparing food is essentially the Willy Wonka factory of the savory food world. We've compiled 20 photos that showcase all the best and most brilliant aspects of this amazing food science to inspire you before your next meal.


Science & Food: 20 Awesome Dishes Made With Molecular Gastronomy

This mad scientist method of preparing food is essentially the Willy Wonka factory of the savory food world.

Molecular gastronomy can be described in a myriad of different ways, but the simplest is to say that the resulting dish is what happens when science meets edible ingredients. This subcategory is actually that of food science rather than of cuisine which is why many people don't necessarily understand it. It describes the process used to create food that has been manipulated via its molecular composition, in order to alter its form, flavor, or texture. The reason so many confuse the process with a food category is because molecular gastronomy has grown in popularity and is seen on many menus, not just those of Michelin star-rated establishments.

To read this and think that molecular gastronomy is simply just another way of cooking is to underestimate its ability to create an experience. Grant Achatz, the owner of Alinea in Chicago, founded his entire career on this practice and is considered one of the first to introduce it to the general public. There, he and his staff are able to create a food experience that's interactive, wildly limitless, and undoubtedly mystifying. You'll see things such as fruit foam, vegetable powder, gelatin cubes that taste like an entire entree. This mad scientist method of preparing food is essentially the Willy Wonka factory of the savory food world. We've compiled 20 photos that showcase all the best and most brilliant aspects of this amazing food science to inspire you before your next meal.


Science & Food: 20 Awesome Dishes Made With Molecular Gastronomy

This mad scientist method of preparing food is essentially the Willy Wonka factory of the savory food world.

Molecular gastronomy can be described in a myriad of different ways, but the simplest is to say that the resulting dish is what happens when science meets edible ingredients. This subcategory is actually that of food science rather than of cuisine which is why many people don't necessarily understand it. It describes the process used to create food that has been manipulated via its molecular composition, in order to alter its form, flavor, or texture. The reason so many confuse the process with a food category is because molecular gastronomy has grown in popularity and is seen on many menus, not just those of Michelin star-rated establishments.

To read this and think that molecular gastronomy is simply just another way of cooking is to underestimate its ability to create an experience. Grant Achatz, the owner of Alinea in Chicago, founded his entire career on this practice and is considered one of the first to introduce it to the general public. There, he and his staff are able to create a food experience that's interactive, wildly limitless, and undoubtedly mystifying. You'll see things such as fruit foam, vegetable powder, gelatin cubes that taste like an entire entree. This mad scientist method of preparing food is essentially the Willy Wonka factory of the savory food world. We've compiled 20 photos that showcase all the best and most brilliant aspects of this amazing food science to inspire you before your next meal.


Science & Food: 20 Awesome Dishes Made With Molecular Gastronomy

This mad scientist method of preparing food is essentially the Willy Wonka factory of the savory food world.

Molecular gastronomy can be described in a myriad of different ways, but the simplest is to say that the resulting dish is what happens when science meets edible ingredients. This subcategory is actually that of food science rather than of cuisine which is why many people don't necessarily understand it. It describes the process used to create food that has been manipulated via its molecular composition, in order to alter its form, flavor, or texture. The reason so many confuse the process with a food category is because molecular gastronomy has grown in popularity and is seen on many menus, not just those of Michelin star-rated establishments.

To read this and think that molecular gastronomy is simply just another way of cooking is to underestimate its ability to create an experience. Grant Achatz, the owner of Alinea in Chicago, founded his entire career on this practice and is considered one of the first to introduce it to the general public. There, he and his staff are able to create a food experience that's interactive, wildly limitless, and undoubtedly mystifying. You'll see things such as fruit foam, vegetable powder, gelatin cubes that taste like an entire entree. This mad scientist method of preparing food is essentially the Willy Wonka factory of the savory food world. We've compiled 20 photos that showcase all the best and most brilliant aspects of this amazing food science to inspire you before your next meal.


Science & Food: 20 Awesome Dishes Made With Molecular Gastronomy

This mad scientist method of preparing food is essentially the Willy Wonka factory of the savory food world.

Molecular gastronomy can be described in a myriad of different ways, but the simplest is to say that the resulting dish is what happens when science meets edible ingredients. This subcategory is actually that of food science rather than of cuisine which is why many people don't necessarily understand it. It describes the process used to create food that has been manipulated via its molecular composition, in order to alter its form, flavor, or texture. The reason so many confuse the process with a food category is because molecular gastronomy has grown in popularity and is seen on many menus, not just those of Michelin star-rated establishments.

To read this and think that molecular gastronomy is simply just another way of cooking is to underestimate its ability to create an experience. Grant Achatz, the owner of Alinea in Chicago, founded his entire career on this practice and is considered one of the first to introduce it to the general public. There, he and his staff are able to create a food experience that's interactive, wildly limitless, and undoubtedly mystifying. You'll see things such as fruit foam, vegetable powder, gelatin cubes that taste like an entire entree. This mad scientist method of preparing food is essentially the Willy Wonka factory of the savory food world. We've compiled 20 photos that showcase all the best and most brilliant aspects of this amazing food science to inspire you before your next meal.


Science & Food: 20 Awesome Dishes Made With Molecular Gastronomy

This mad scientist method of preparing food is essentially the Willy Wonka factory of the savory food world.

Molecular gastronomy can be described in a myriad of different ways, but the simplest is to say that the resulting dish is what happens when science meets edible ingredients. This subcategory is actually that of food science rather than of cuisine which is why many people don't necessarily understand it. It describes the process used to create food that has been manipulated via its molecular composition, in order to alter its form, flavor, or texture. The reason so many confuse the process with a food category is because molecular gastronomy has grown in popularity and is seen on many menus, not just those of Michelin star-rated establishments.

To read this and think that molecular gastronomy is simply just another way of cooking is to underestimate its ability to create an experience. Grant Achatz, the owner of Alinea in Chicago, founded his entire career on this practice and is considered one of the first to introduce it to the general public. There, he and his staff are able to create a food experience that's interactive, wildly limitless, and undoubtedly mystifying. You'll see things such as fruit foam, vegetable powder, gelatin cubes that taste like an entire entree. This mad scientist method of preparing food is essentially the Willy Wonka factory of the savory food world. We've compiled 20 photos that showcase all the best and most brilliant aspects of this amazing food science to inspire you before your next meal.


Science & Food: 20 Awesome Dishes Made With Molecular Gastronomy

This mad scientist method of preparing food is essentially the Willy Wonka factory of the savory food world.

Molecular gastronomy can be described in a myriad of different ways, but the simplest is to say that the resulting dish is what happens when science meets edible ingredients. This subcategory is actually that of food science rather than of cuisine which is why many people don't necessarily understand it. It describes the process used to create food that has been manipulated via its molecular composition, in order to alter its form, flavor, or texture. The reason so many confuse the process with a food category is because molecular gastronomy has grown in popularity and is seen on many menus, not just those of Michelin star-rated establishments.

To read this and think that molecular gastronomy is simply just another way of cooking is to underestimate its ability to create an experience. Grant Achatz, the owner of Alinea in Chicago, founded his entire career on this practice and is considered one of the first to introduce it to the general public. There, he and his staff are able to create a food experience that's interactive, wildly limitless, and undoubtedly mystifying. You'll see things such as fruit foam, vegetable powder, gelatin cubes that taste like an entire entree. This mad scientist method of preparing food is essentially the Willy Wonka factory of the savory food world. We've compiled 20 photos that showcase all the best and most brilliant aspects of this amazing food science to inspire you before your next meal.